Effective Teachers for At-Risk or Highly Mobile Students: What are the Dispositions and Behaviors of Award-Winning Teachers?


Effective Teachers for At-Risk or Highly Mobile Students: What are the Dispositions and Behaviors of Award-Winning Teachers?

Issue/Topic: At-Risk (incl. Dropout Prevention); Instructional Approaches; Teaching Quality--Evaluation and Effectiveness
Author(s): Grant, Leslie; Popp, Patricia; Stronge, James
Organization(s): Old Dominion University; The College of William & Mary
Publication: Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR)
Published On: 11/10/2011

Background:
Extensive research has been done in synthesizing what is known about the qualities off effective teachers, in general. However, little evidence has been assimilated regarding the qualities of effective teachers of at-risk or highly mobile students. Furthermore, these populations that need high-quality teachers most often have teachers who do not meet the standards of highly effective teaching.

Purpose:
To examine what constitutes effective teaching, particularly with at-risk or highly mobile students.

Findings/Results:

Findings from In-Classroom Observation

Teachers identified as effective with at-risk or highly mobile students:

Findings from Teacher Interviews

Student Relationships

Teachers identified as effective with at-risk and highly mobile students:

Academics

Teachers identified as effective with at-risk and highly mobile students:

 


Policy Implications/Recommendations:


Research Design:
Case study research - including quantitative and qualitative measures.

Population/Participants/Subjects:
Cross-case analysis of U.S. national or state award-winning teachers who taught in schools with student populations characterized as highly mobile, homeless, and/or high poverty. Six teachers meeting the criteria were selected.

Year data is from:


Setting:
National

Data Collection and Analysis:
In-classroom observations of teaching practices related to instructional strategies, student engagement, cognitive levels of learning, and teacher-versus student-directed learning. Semi-structured interviews focusing on teacher beliefs and practices.

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