High School-Level Accountability

High School-Level Accountability


This database provides 50-state information on the indicators, notifications/supports, sanctions and rewards established in state policy in response to federal and state-level accountability initiatives. Policies relate to high school-level (not district-level) accountability.

This database seeks to address the following questions:

1. Indicators

1A . What indicators/measures of quality does the state use to determine high school performance?

Although all states include graduation rate as an indicator, only one state includes college remediation.

1B. What indicators/measures are used for reporting purposes?

Six states report on school safety issues, and one reports on college remediation rate for high schools.

Information on why this issue matters is available through this link.

2. Notification and Supports

2A. Is the state required to provide written warning?

Currently, 33 states provide written warning to low-performing schools.

2B. Is the state or other entity required to provide technical assistance?

Forty-nine states make provisions for technical assistance.

2C. Is the state required to provide additional funding to a low-performing school?

At this time, seven states provide additional funding to a low-performing school.

2D. Is the low-performing school required to create and implement an improvement plan?

Forty-four states require low-performing schools to create and implement an improvement plan.

2E. Is another entity, such as the state, required to create an improvement plan for a low-performing school?

Twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia hold the low-performing school responsible for developing the initial improvement plan. If the school continues to be low-performing, ten states require another entity to create an improvement plan and eight states require another entity to assist in the developent of an improvement plan. Five states require the state, the district or the county board to create the plan.

Information on why this issue matters is available through this link.

3. Sanctions

3A. Does the state have the authority to place a school on probation?

Currently, 19 states have this authority.

3B. Does the state have the authority to remove a low-performing school's accreditation?

Twenty-two states have the authority to remove accreditation.

3C. Does the state have the authority to reconstitute staff?

At present, 43 states can use reconstitution in an effort to not only raise student achievement but also to improve the climate of the school.

3D. Does the state have the authority to reopen the school as a public charter school?

Twenty-two states allow low-performing schools to be closed and reopened as public charter schools.

3E. Does the state have the authority to take over the school?

Twenty-nine states are able to take over a low-performing school.

3F. Does the state have the authority to contract with an outside entity to operate the school?

Currently, 32 states and the District of Columbia have this authority.

3G. Can the state require some other major restructuring?

Twenty-eight states authorize some other form of major restructuring.

Information on why this issue matters is available through this link.

4. Rewards

4A. Does the state reward high-performing schools?

Thirty-nine states currently reward high-performance, and one state is developing a rewards program.

4B. Are the school rewards monetary or nonmonetary?

Sixteen states are have both monetary and nonmonetary rewards.

4C. Are reward recipients school and/or staff?

Schools receive the reward in 33 states, while both schools and staff receive the rewards in four states.

4D. Can school rewards be used for staff bonuses?

Only eight states allow the school reward to be used for staff bonuses.

4E. Are school rewards based on absolute performance or school improvement?

Ten states base the reward on school improvement, and 11 states base the reward on school improvement. Eighteen states base the reward either on school improvement or absolute performance.

Information on why this issue matters is available through this link.

Methodology:
Policies were collected from state statutes, recently enacted legislation (session laws), and rules and regulations. Where necessary, statewide initiatives created outside of policy were collected from state education agencies. The information will be updated as changes occur.

Last updated:
August 2008

Research was conducted by Melodye Bush. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303-299-3689 or jdounay@ecs.org with comments or questions about this database.



Michigan

Indicators for High School Accountability
What indicators/measures of quality does the state use to determine high school performance?
  • English language arts assessment score
  • Math assessment score
  • Participation rates
  • High school graduation rates.
What indicators/measures are used for reporting purposes?
  • Accreditation status of each school
  • Process by which pupils are assigned to particular schools and a description of each specialized school
  • Status of the 3- to 5-year school improvement plan
  • Copy of the core academic curriculum and a description of its implementation including how pupils are ensured enrollment in those courses or subjects necessary for them to receive adequate instruction in all of the core academic curriculum
  • Student achievement based upon the results of locally-administered student competency tests, statewide tests and nationally normed achievement tests
  • Pupil retention
  • Number and percentage of parents, legal guardians or persons in loco parentis with students enrolled in the school district who participate in parent-teacher conferences
  • For high schools:
    • Number and percentage of pupils enrolled in the school during the immediately preceding school year in a postsecondary course
    • Number and percentage of pupils enrolled in the school during the immediately preceding school year in a postsecondary course disaggregated by grade level
    • Number and percentage of those students who took a college level equivalent credit examination
    • Number and percentage of pupils taking the college level equivalent credit examination who achieved a score that is at or above the level recommended by the testing service for college credit.

 

Sources Indicators: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. §§ 380.1204a, 380.1277, 380.1278 and 380.1280 (commonly referred to as Public Act 25), 388.1619
Notification and Supports for Low-Performing High Schools
State required to provide written warning? No
State or other entity required to provide technical assistance? Yes
State required to provide additional funding to low-performing school? No
Low-performing school required to create and implement improvement plan? Yes, after initially being designated as low-performing.
Does another entity, such as the state, have to create an improvement plan for a low-performing school? Yes, if the school has been unaccredited for three consecutive years they may be provided assistance by the district or by a consortium of intermediate school districts.
Sources Notification: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. §§ 380.1280(12), 388.1619, Michigan School Improvement Framework
Sanctions for Low-Performing High Schools
Does the state have the authority to place a school on probation? No
Does the state have the authority to remove a low-performing school's accreditation? Yes
Does the state have the authority to reconstitute staff? Yes
Does the state have the authority to reopen the school as a public charter school? No
Does the state have the authority to take over the school? Yes
Does the state have the authority to contract with an outside entity to operate the school? Yes
Can the state require some other major restructuring? Yes, the school may be required to align itself with an existing research-based school improvement model or establish an affiliation for providing assistance to the school with a college or university located in the state.
Sources Sanctions: MICH. COMP. LAWS ANN. §§ 380.1280(12), 388.1619
Rewards
Does the state reward high-performing schools? No
School rewards monetary or nonmonetary? Not applicable
Are reward recipients school and/or staff? Not applicable
Can school rewards be used for staff bonuses? State does not have a reward program.
Are school rewards based on absolute performance or school improvement? Not applicable
Sources Rewards: Not applicable

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