Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile

Advanced Placement Policies: State Profile - North Carolina


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, local boards must ensure that all high school students have access to advanced courses (AP or International Baccalaureate) in language arts, math, science, and social studies. Such access may be provided through enrollment in courses offered through or approved by the North Carolina Virtual Public School.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School report cards must include AP course participation and AP exam participation and performance.

In addition, while not an accountability reporting metric, the state board of education must report annually to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee on advanced courses (AP and IB) in North Carolina. The report must include:
  • The North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership's report to the Department of Public Instruction and the state board's assessment of that report
  • Number of students enrolled in advanced courses and participating in advanced course exams, including demographic information by gender, race, and free and reduced-price lunch status
  • Student performance on advanced course examinations, including information by course, local school administrative unit, and school
  • Number of students participating in 10th grade PSAT/NMSQT testing
  • Number of teachers attending summer institutes offered by the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Distribution of funding appropriated for advanced course testing fees and professional development by local school administrative unit and school
  • Status and efforts of the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Other trends in advanced courses and exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state board of education must seek a partner, such as the College Board, to form the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership (Partnership), to assist in improving college readiness of secondary students and to assist secondary schools to ensure that students have access to high-quality, rigorous academics with a focus on access to AP courses.
In order to implement its responsibilities, the partner selected by the state board must provide staff to, among other duties:
  • Provide professional development to provide AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge, instructional skills, and materials to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and mastery of postsecondary course content
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP courses
  • Provide teachers of grades 7-12 with preadvanced course professional development and materials that prepare students for success in AP courses
  • Provide consulting expertise and technical assistance to support implementation
  • Prioritize assistance to schools designated as low-performing by the state board and provide for frequent visits to the schools targeted by the Partnership.
The Partnership must report annually to the department of public instruction on the Partnership's implementation of its responsibilities. Beginning November 15, 2014, the state board must report annually to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee on advanced courses in North Carolina. The report must include, at a minimum:
  • The North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership's report to the Department of Public Instruction and the state board's assessment of that report
  • Number of students enrolled in advanced courses and participating in advanced course exams, including demographic information by gender, race, and free and reduced-price lunch status
  • Student performance on advanced course exams, including information by course, local school administrative unit, and school
  • Number of students participating in 10th grade PSAT/NMSQT testing
  • Number of teachers attending summer institutes offered by the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Distribution of funding appropriated for advanced course testing fees and professional development by local school administrative unit and school
  • Status and efforts of the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Other trends in advanced courses and examinations.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Statute provides that to the extent funds are made available for this purpose, public school students must be exempt from paying any fees for administration of examinations for advanced courses and registration fees for advanced courses in which the student is enrolled regardless of the score the student achieves on an examination.

Low-income and non-low-income students will pay $0 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied. This applies both to subject-area specific AP exams, as well as AP Research and AP Seminar Exams.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The North Carolina Virtual Public School offers AP courses.

The results of student diagnostic tests, such as the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) and ACT, must be used to identify students prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in advanced courses (AP and IB). Students may also be identified for potential enrollment in advanced courses based on other criteria established by schools to increase access to those courses for their students.

Local boards of education must provide information to students and parents on available opportunities and the enrollment process for students to take advanced courses. The information must explain the value of advanced courses in preparing students for postsecondary level coursework, enabling students to gain access to postsecondary opportunities, and qualifying for scholarships and other financial aid opportunities.

The state board of education must seek a partner, such as the College Board, to form the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership (Partnership), to assist in improving college readiness of secondary students and to assist secondary schools to ensure that students have access to high-quality, rigorous academics with a focus on access to AP courses.
In order to implement its responsibilities, the partner selected by the state board must provide staff to, among other duties:
  • Provide teachers of students in grades seven through 12 with preadvanced course professional development and materials that prepare students for success in Advanced Placement courses.
  • Provide consulting expertise and technical assistance to support implementation.
  • Prioritize assistance to schools designated as low-performing by the State Board of Education and provide for frequent visits to the schools targeted by the Partnership.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, the state board of education strongly endorses that all students enrolled in AP courses take the corresponding AP exams.  This policy must be communicated to all school superintendents, who must annually notify all principals of this policy.
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