Dual Enrollment - State Profile

Dual Enrollment - State Profile - Ohio

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Methodology:
This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

Data compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.
 

Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment includes the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, Advanced Placement courses, early college high schools, and any similar program established pursuant to an agreement between a school district or nonpublic high school and an institution of higher education.

Unless otherwise indicated, all policies refer to Post-Secondary Enrollment Options.
Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program. The chancellor of the board of regents may determine the manner in which a course included in the board of regents’ clearinghouse of digital texts, interactive distance learning courses, and other distance learning courses may be offered as a dual enrollment program.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. Students elect at the time of course enrollment whether to take the course for college credit only, for high school credit only, or for high school and college credit.
Students may take developmental/remedial courses through dual enrollment program Yes. However, students/parents must bear the cost of tuition and all other expenses for remedial courses taken by a student at a college or university. Participation in remedial courses is not reflected in district and school public accountability report cards.
CTE component Yes. Each joint vocational school district must offer the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, and at least one dual enrollment program. In addition, each district and building’s public accountability report card must include the number of district or building students who have earned at least three college credits through state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation.
Unique characteristics Nonpublic high schools must provide students with the opportunity to participate in the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, including Seniors to Sophomores, or a dual enrollment program. Homeschooled students may participate in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. The state provides a base amount of $1 million dollars to cover the cost of nonpublic school student participation in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. If the department of education receives a request for program participation after exceeding that amount, the department, within one week of the receipt of such application, notify the applicant, the applicant's nonpublic school, and the college accepting the applicant (and all subsequent applicants, their nonpublic schools, and colleges accepting them) that funds will not be available for the applicant's participation in the program during the year for which the application was made.

Effective with the 2014-15 academic year, state universities (with exceptions) may permit state residents who first entered grade 9 in the 2010-11 school year to begin undergraduate coursework if the individual completed the Ohio core high school graduation requirements. However, a student who completed at least 10 semester hours or the equivalent at another public postsecondary institution other than a state university in credit-bearing college courses is exempt from this admissions requirement.

Statute provides for the enrollment (or discontinued enrollment) and funding provisions relative to a student who is expelled while participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options.

A college must give priority to its other students regarding enrollment in courses. However, once a student has been accepted in a course as a participant, the institution may not displace the participant for another student.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. Each city, local, exempted village, joint vocational school district and chartered nonpublic high school must provide students in grades 9-12 with the opportunity to participate in a dual enrollment program (i.e., Advanced Placement, early college high school, Post-Secondary Enrollment Options, and any similar program established pursuant to an agreement between a school district or nonpublic high school and an institution of higher education). However, postsecondary institutions are not required to accept eligible students.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private and for-profit two- and four-year institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student participation in the program must be based solely on a college’s established placement standards for credit-bearing courses.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. However, a student first enrolling in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options in grade 9 may not take more than the equivalent of four years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 10 may not take more than the equivalent of three years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Each district, community school (charter school), and nonpublic high school must provide information to all students in grades 8-11 about the dual enrollment programs the district or school offers. Information provided must include (1) program eligibility, including freshman status as locally determined, and acceptance by college, and (2) program options, including enrollment in college courses for college credit, or both high school graduation and college credit, and financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials, and fees for each option.

Each district, community school, and nonpublic high school must document the method by which the notification was made with an underlying purpose and intent to ensure each student eligible for the program is aware of the program and the student's opportunity to participate.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. School districts and participating community schools (charter schools) and nonpublic schools must provide counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents before students participate, to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the advantages, possible risks and consequences of participation. Counseling information must include:
  • Program eligibility, including freshman status as locally determined, and acceptance by college
  • Options as to whether the student/parent will
    • bear tuition and other fees and earn college credit only, or high school and college credit
    • have the college reimbursed by the department of education or an alternative funding agreement between the district and institution, and receive high school and college credit
  • Financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials, and fees
  • The process for granting academic credits
  • Criteria for any transportation aid
  • Available support services
  • Scheduling
  • The consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls and the effect of the grade attained in the course being included in the student's grade point average, if applicable
  • The effect of program participation on the student's ability to complete the district's, community school's, or nonpublic school's graduation requirements
  • The academic and social responsibilities of students and parents under the program
  • Information about and encouragement to use the counseling services of the college in which the student intends to enroll
  • Information confirming that the student can take college courses at no cost
  • Encouragement to all students who have the ability to undertake college work, especially gifted students, to seriously consider the program
  • That students participating in the program may enroll in more than one college.
Nonpublic school counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents regarding Post-Secondary Enrollment Options must also include an explanation that funding may be limited and that not all nonpublic students who wish to participate may be able to do so.

The school district, community school, or nonpublic school must document that the student and parent received the aforementioned counseling, and that they understand the responsibilities the student and the student's parent must assume in the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program. The district, community school or participating nonpublic school must maintain documentation of the counseling required.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Local decision. Public school students may elect:
  • To be responsible for all tuition and the cost of all textbooks, materials, and fees. A student choosing this option elects, at the time of enrollment, to receive only college credit or high school and college credit.
  • For the department of education to reimburse the college, or for the district, community school, STEM school to enter into an agreement for an alternate method to calculate or transmit the amount the institution would be paid for a participating student. However, the department of education will not reimburse a college for a remedial college course (costs borne by student/parent). These options are not available to the student if the student is enrolled full-time in the student's district, community school, STEM school, or nonpublic school.
No school district may charge a student an additional fee or tuition for participation in any dual enrollment program. A postsecondary institution must furnish all textbooks and materials for a course (and may not charge the student for tuition or fees) if the department of education reimburses the institution for the course.

However, if a student earns a nonpassing grade, the district superintendent or head of the community school or STEM school must seek reimbursement from the participant/participant's parent for the amount of state funds paid to the college on behalf of the participant for that college course.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. If a public school Post-Secondary Enrollment Options student elects to pay his/her tuition and other course costs, the school district’s formula ADM reflects that the participant is not enrolled in school anywhere (school receives less than full ADM). If the student elects for the department of education to reimburse the college (only for credit-bearing courses) or to enter into an agreement using an alternate funding formula to calculate or transmit the amount the institution would be paid for a participating student, the district is funded at the same level as it would be for a traditional high school student. The student must bear tuition and other course costs if the student is enrolled as a full-time student in the student's district, community school, STEM school, or nonpublic school.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. The institution receives from the state the lesser of:
  • College tuition base multiplied by the participant's full-time equivalency percentage; or
  • Actual costs that would have been the participant’s responsibility if s/he had enrolled in the college as a postsecondary student independent of the postsecondary enrollment options program multiplied by the participant's full-time equivalency percentage.
The state does not reimburse colleges for remedial courses taken by a secondary school student.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor qualifications component Yes. Post-Secondary Enrollment Options students are expected and required to perform at the same level as the college’s regular students.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The chancellor of the board of regents must annually submit a report to the governor and general assembly a report that includes a description of dual enrollment programs offered by school districts, community schools (charter schools), STEM schools, college-preparatory boarding schools, and nonpublic high schools, and post the information on the chancellor’s website. (R.C. § 3333.041(4)) The department of education must also annually compile a list of all institutions participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options or another dual enrollment program, and distribute to all school districts, community schools, STEM schools, and nonpublic schools.

In addition, while not a “graded” measure for purposes of district or school accountability, a district or building’s public accountability report card must include the number of district or building students who have earned at least three college credits through dual enrollment programs, such as Post-Secondary Enrollment Options and state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Ohio's public two- and four-year colleges and universities must accept transfer credit for successfully completed (as defined in transfer policy), college-level courses from Ohio institutions of higher education which are accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Higher Learning Commission or other regional accrediting commissions which have been recognized by the Council On Higher Education Accreditation.

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