Dual Enrollment - State Profile

Dual Enrollment - State Profile - Minnesota

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Methodology:
This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

Data compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.
 

Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options (the first state-level dual enrollment policy in the U.S.) refers to student enrollment in courses offered by postsecondary institutions for either postsecondary credit alone, or high school and postsecondary credit. Under Postsecondary Enrollment Options, Concurrent Enrollment refers to courses taught by a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member at a secondary school, or another location as per an agreement between a public school board and the postsecondary institution.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other (Course may be offered at another location according to an agreement between a public school board and the governing body of an eligible public postsecondary system or an eligible private postsecondary institution)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. A district must grant academic credit to a course for secondary credit, but must grant academic credit for a postsecondary course only if requested by a student.
Students may take developmental/remedial courses through dual enrollment program No
CTE component Yes. A student in grades 10-12 may enroll in a CTE course offered by a Minnesota state college or university. An applicant 10th grader must have received a passing score on the 8th grade Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment in reading. A student who is refused enrollment by a Minnesota state college or university may apply to a private, nonprofit two-year trade and technical school granting associate degrees, or an opportunities industrialization center accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. If a student receives a “C” or better in the CTE course, the postsecondary institution must allow the student to take additional postsecondary courses for secondary credit.

A district offering a CTE course as a concurrent enrollment course (taught at the high school by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member) may receive aid for the course only if it is a technical course within a recognized CTE program of study approved by the commissioner of education and the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.
Unique characteristics Tribal school, home-schooled and private school students may also participate, and their program costs are paid by the department of education. A nonpublic secondary institution must proportionately adjust its tuition to accurately reflect the time an alternative pupil spends in a postsecondary enrollment course or program.

A postsecondary institution must give priority to its postsecondary students when enrolling 10th, 11th, and 12th grade pupils in its courses. However, once a student has been enrolled in a postsecondary course through Postsecondary Enrollment Options, the student may not be displaced by another student.

The postsecondary institution must inform the student of the support services available at that institution. If the student has an individualized education program (IEP) that provides general education support and accommodations, the postsecondary institution must provide the support services as described in the IEP and the postsecondary institution and the district must negotiate an agreement on the rate to be charged for the services. Nothing may prevent the student from enrolling while the agreement is being developed. If the parties cannot agree on the services, on application of either party, the commissioner of education must resolve the dispute in the same manner the commissioner fixes tuition rates for K-12 special education instruction and services outside a student’s district of residence.

A student enrolled in a high school 40 miles or more from the nearest eligible institution may request that the district offer one or more accelerated or advanced academic courses, and a district must offer an accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit a student requests such a course. A student may enroll in a course offered for either secondary or postsecondary credit. The district may decide which course to offer, how to offer the course, and whether to offer one or more courses. The district must offer at least one such course in the next academic period and must continue to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit in later academic periods.

High school dropouts under the age of 21 who are participating in the graduation incentives program to earn a high school diploma are eligible to participate in Postsecondary Enrollment Options.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private, nonprofit two-year trade and technical school granting associate degrees, an opportunities industrialization center accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and a private, residential, two-year or four-year, liberal arts may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12 (for CTE course)
  • Student in grades 11-12 (for academic course) (a 9th or 10th grade student may apply to enroll if, after all 11th and 12th grade students have applied for a course, additional students are necessary to offer the course)
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in Postsecondary Enrollment Options in grade 9 may not take more than the equivalent of four years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 10 may not take more than the equivalent of three years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. A district must provide information about the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program to all students in grades 8-11.

In addition, a postsecondary institution may provide information about its programs to a secondary school or to a student or parent and may advertise or otherwise recruit or solicit participation on educational and programmatic grounds only.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. To the extent possible, the school or district must provide counseling services to students and their parents before students enroll in courses, to ensure that the students and parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The school or district information must include who may enroll, what institutions and courses are eligible for participation, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by students and their parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate.

Prior to enrolling in a course, the student and the student's parent must sign a form stating that they have received the aforementioned information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The department must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school or district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. For a student earning both high school and postsecondary credit, or just high school credit, state (department of education). The state uses the following formula to reimburse colleges/universities: 88% of the product of the formula allowance minus $415, multiplied by 1.3 divided by 30 for schools on a semester calendar, and by 45 for schools on a quarter calendar. For a student taking a course for postsecondary credit only, or for any postsecondary courses in which a student is enrolled in addition to being enrolled full time in the student’s district: the student or parent is responsible for tuition, fees, textbooks, and materials.

An institution may not charge a student enrolled in a course for secondary and postsecondary credit for fees, textbooks, materials, support services, or other necessary costs, except for equipment purchased by the student that becomes the property of the student.
How state funds participating high schools Postsecondary Enrollment Options students are funded at a higher level. PSEO students are counted as 1.3 pupil units (1.2 pupil units effective fiscal year 2015 and later). Districts offering a concurrent enrollment course (taught at the high school by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member) are also eligible for an additional $150 per student, but only if the course is accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership, in the process of being accredited, or is shown by clear evidence to be of comparable standard to accredited courses, or is a technical course within a recognized career and technical education program of study approved by the commissioner of education and the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities. The additional aid must be used to defray the cost of delivering the course at the high school.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Postsecondary institutions may be (but are not required to be) funded at a higher level for courses offered on the postsecondary campus. If a course is offered at a secondary school and taught by secondary teacher, the postsecondary system or institution must not require a payment from the school board that exceeds the cost to the postsecondary institution that is directly attributable to providing that course.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor qualifications component Yes. Postsecondary institutions are encouraged to apply for accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships. Districts may use the ≥2% of basic revenue they are required to reserve for staff development in order to pay for coursework and training leading to certification as a college in the schools or concurrent enrollment teacher. In order to receive a grant, the teacher must be enrolled in a program that includes coursework and training focused on teaching a core subject.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The commissioner of education must annually report to the education committees of the legislature the number of students enrolled in Postsecondary Enrollment Options in each school district, the number of teachers in each district attending training programs offered by Minnesota concurrent enrollment programs, recent trends in the field of postsecondary enrollment options, and expenditures for Postsecondary Enrollment Options.

In addition, when reporting student performance through the state accountability system, the commissioner of education must report a rigorous coursework measure indicating the number and percentage of high school graduates in the most recent school year who successfully completed one or more postsecondary enrollment options, including concurrent enrollment.
Program evaluation component Yes. The commissioner of education’s annual report to the education committees of the legislature must include any recommendations for Postsecondary Enrollment Options.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. However, the Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota must, and private nonprofit and proprietary postsecondary institutions should, award postsecondary credit for any courses in a program certified by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (this applies to courses taught at a high school and taught by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member).

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