Dual Enrollment - State Profile

Dual Enrollment - State Profile - Michigan

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Methodology:
This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

Data compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.
 

Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs: Postsecondary Enrollment Options allows students to enroll in postsecondary courses for high school and/or postsecondary credit. Under the Career and Technical Preparation Act (2000), a student may enroll in a CTE course at an eligible postsecondary institution.

In addition, fifth-year high school pupils in attendance at a school district, intermediate school district or public school academy may enroll in postsecondary or CTE preparation dual enrollment courses if the pupil has not met all high school diploma requirements, and is enrolled in not more than 2 postsecondary dual enrollment courses taken at any given time and not more than 4 postsecondary enrollment courses taken during the school year. The pupil must have a plan on file at the district to complete district graduation requirements within the academic year, including postsecondary dual enrollment options.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program. The Michigan Virtual High School is authorized to offer college level equivalent courses and dual enrollment opportunities. In addition, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $9,387,500 for 2013-14 for the Michigan virtual university to operate the Michigan virtual learning research institute. One of the tasks of the institute is to create and maintain a public statewide catalog of online learning courses being offered by all public schools in the state. If the course offerings are included in the statewide catalog of online courses, the Michigan virtual school operated by the Michigan virtual university may offer online course offerings, including dual enrollment opportunities.
     
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both programs: Not specified. At the time a public school student enrolls in a postsecondary course, he/she must designate whether the course is for high school or postsecondary credit, or both. A nonpublic school student may enroll only for postsecondary credit and may not receive high school credit for the course. Exceptions provided for a course that would be determined “a nonessential elective course” under specified circumstances.
Students may take developmental/remedial courses through dual enrollment program Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. The provisions of the Career and Technical Preparation Act mirror those of Postsecondary Enrollment Options, but are specific to postsecondary coursework taken by high school students for high school and/or postsecondary credit.
Unique characteristics Both programs: Nonpublic school students may also participate.

An eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program may give priority to its postsecondary students when enrolling Postsecondary Enrollment Options or Career and Technical Preparation Act students for high school credit only. Once a student has been enrolled in a course through one of these programs, the postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program may not displace the student with another student.

If a school district or public school academy maintains pupil portfolios for high school pupils, each pupil's portfolio must include all academic records and correspondence relating to the pupil's participation in a postsecondary course under the postsecondary enrollment options act.

There is allocated for 2013-14 an amount not to exceed $80,000,000.00 to provide incentive payments of $52 per pupil to districts that meet best practices set forth in statute. A district will receive an incentive payment if, by June 1, 2014, it satisfies at least 7 of 8 requirements, including supporting opportunities for students to receive postsecondary credit.

Any additional funding provided to community college operations in fiscal year 2013-2014 that exceeds the amounts appropriated for operations in fiscal year 2012-2013 is distributed based on a formula that gives 15% consideration to a college’s local strategic value component, as developed in cooperation with the Michigan community college association. The appropriation for local strategic value must be allocated to each community college that certifies to the state budget director, through a board of trustees resolution by November 1, 2013, that the college has met 4 out of 5 best practices listed in each of three categories, including an “educational partnerships” category. One of the five “educational partnerships” criteria is that the community college has active partnerships with regional high schools, intermediate school districts, and career-tech centers to provide instruction through dual enrollment, direct credit, middle college, or academy programs.

A high school that does not offer all credits it must offer for purposes of accreditation may maintain accreditation by ensuring students can access the required credits by another means, such as enrollment in a postsecondary course under the postsecondary enrollment options act.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Both programs: Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both programs: Both. Tribal colleges and independent nonprofit colleges and universities may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Other. Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Student must have either earned a qualifying score in each subject area on a readiness assessment in English, mathematics, reading, social studies, and science selected by the superintendent of public instruction, or the Michigan merit examination. If not, student is limited to a course in a subject area for which he or she has achieved a qualifying score, a course in computer science or foreign language not offered by the school district, or a course in fine arts as permitted by the school district. Career and Technical Preparation Act: A student who has not taken the Michigan merit examination must have achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on a readiness assessment and a student who has taken the Michigan merit examination must have achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on the Michigan merit examination. A student who has not achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on a readiness assessment or the Michigan merit examination. A student who has not achieved a qualifying score on either assessment may be eligible if he/she achieves a qualifying score in math and a qualifying score on a nationally or industry recognized job skills assessment test as determined by the superintendent of public instruction.
Cap on number of credits students may earn For both programs: If there is no written agreement between a student’s school district and the eligible postsecondary institution to waive limits, a course is not an eligible course if the student’s participation would exceed: (1) more than 10 courses overall; (2) more than 2 courses per year if student first enrolls in a course in grade 9, not more than 2 courses during each academic year in the student's 1st, 2nd , or 3rd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program and not more than 4 courses during the academic year in the student's 4th academic year of enrollment; (3) If the student first enrolls in a course in grade 10, not more than 2 courses during the 1st academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career or technical preparation program, not more than 4 courses during 2nd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program, and not more than 4 courses during 3rd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program; or (4) subject to the limit of 10 courses overall, if the student first enrolls in a course when the student is in grade 11 or 12, not more than 6 courses during either of those academic years. A student must be enrolled in at least 1 high school course.

In addition, a 5th year high school student who has not completed all high school graduation requirements is limited to enrollment in no more than 2 postsecondary or CTE preparation courses at any one time, and no more than 4 such courses during the school year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Both programs: Yes. Each district and state approved nonpublic school must provide general information about both programs to all students in grades 8 and higher. Each school district or state approved nonpublic school must provide information to all high school students both programs, including enrollment eligibility; the institutions (or CTE programs) and types of courses eligible for participation; the decision making process for granting academic credits; an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, and of financial arrangements for eligible charges and for paying costs not paid for by the school district or department of treasury; eligibility for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district or department of treasury, as applicable; an explanation that, if the student qualifies for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district or department of treasury, the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, will pay that support directly to the eligible postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program) upon being billed by the eligible postsecondary institution and that the student is not responsible for that payment but is responsible for payment of costs not paid for; available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course in which the eligible student enrolls, including the possibility of being required to repay the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, for money paid on behalf of the eligible student; the effect of enrolling in a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements; and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the eligible student and his/her parent or guardian.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Both programs: Yes. To the extent possible, a school district or state approved nonpublic school must provide counseling services to an eligible student and his/her parent before the student enrolls in a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course to ensure that the student and parent are fully aware of the benefits, risks, and possible consequences of enrolling in the course. The person providing the counseling must encourage the eligible student and his /her parent to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program) before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate. A school district or state approved nonpublic school may provide this required counseling in a group meeting if additional personalized counseling is also made available.

Before enrolling in a course at a postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program), a student and his/her parent must file with the postsecondary institution or CTE preparation program a signed form provided by the student's district or nonpublic school stating that the student is an eligible student and has received the aforementioned information and counseling, and that the student understands the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in the course. Upon request, the department must provide technical assistance to a district or nonpublic school and to an eligible postsecondary institution or CTE preparation program in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines for these purposes.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Both programs: Combination of state, district, and student/parent. For a public school student, the district is required to pay to the higher education institution either the amount of the tuition or the amount of state funding the district receives for that student for the part of the day the student attends the course or career and technical preparation program. For example, if a student is enrolled in PSEO or Career and Technical Preparation Act coursework 20% of the school day and the district receives $10,000 from the state for that student, the district must pay the higher education institution either the cost of tuition or $2,000 (20 x $10,000), whichever is less.

A district may, but is not required to, pay more to a postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program on a student’s behalf than is required by statute, and may use local school operating revenue for that purpose.

The student must pay any additional tuition costs above and beyond what the district pays.

For a nonpublic school student, the department of treasury pays the institution or career and technical preparation program. The student is responsible for paying the remainder of the costs that exceed the amount the department of treasury is statutorily required to pay.

A public school or nonpublic school student who does not complete a course must refund the school district or department of treasury any funds not reimbursed the district or department of treasury by the postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program. If the eligible student does not repay this money, the school district may impose sanctions against the public school student as determined by school district policy.
How state funds participating high schools Both programs: Equal, provided the number of classes a student is enrolled in at a high school and postsecondary institution equal the number of classes per day required to be classified as a full-time pupil or of a reduced schedule, or the sum of high school and postsecondary course time and the number of hours of travel time meet the minimum number of hours required to meet a reduced schedule.

A student may not be enrolled beyond full-time in high school/postsecondary or career and technical preparation courses combined, is not retaking a course after failing to achieve a satisfactory grade, or is enrolled in a course contrary to eligibility provisions.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal 
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor qualifications component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Both programs: Yes. Each intermediate school district must annually collect the following information from its constituent school districts and provide to the department of education: the amount of money expended by the school district for payments required under each program; the number of eligible students who were enrolled in the school district and the number of those eligible students who enrolled in 1 or more postsecondary or CTE courses and received payment of all or part of eligible charges, both in the aggregate and by grade level; the percentage of the school district's enrollment represented by the eligible students described above, both in the aggregate and by grade level; and the total number of postsecondary or CTE courses for which the school district made payment, the number of those courses for which postsecondary credit was granted, the number of those courses for which high school credit was granted, and the number of those courses not completed by the eligible student.

Each participating postsecondary institution and CTE preparation program must annually report to the department the number of eligible students who enrolled in the institution or CTE program during the preceding academic year; the total number of courses completed by participating students at the institution or CTE preparation program during the preceding academic year; the number of aforementioned courses for which the institution or CTE preparation program granted a participating student postsecondary credit; and the number of aforementioned courses for which the institution or CTE preparation program declined to grant postsecondary credit.

By March 1 of each year, the department must submit to the house and senate fiscal agencies and the department of technology management, and budget a summary annual report on the information received through these provisions. 

In addition, if a district board wants all of its schools to be accredited, it must submit an annual report to the state board that must include, for each high school in the district, the number and percentage of pupils in the school who enrolled during the preceding school year in 1 or more postsecondary courses under the postsecondary enrollment options act, and in comparison with the year preceding that. The department must prepare and submit to the legislature a report of the information submitted through district reports, aggregated for statewide and intermediate school district totals.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

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