Dual Enrollment - State Profile

Dual Enrollment - State Profile - Iowa

For the most recent version of this database click here.

Methodology:
This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

Data compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.
 

Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Senior Year Plus (SYP) is an umbrella program created in 2008 that encompasses Concurrent Enrollment, Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEO), Advanced Placement (AP), Career Academies, Regional Academies, and, most recently, Project Lead the Way. Though many of these programs were available to students in Iowa prior to 2008, the SYP legislation was implemented to provide increased and more equal access to college credit and AP courses. SYP programs offer students an opportunity to enroll in college coursework and, in most cases, receive both high school and college credit simultaneously. Specifically, “Senior Year Plus” includes:
  • A “district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment” program administered by the department permitting eligible students in grades 9-12 to enroll part-time in rigorous academic or technical coursework approved by the board of directors of a school district through a contractual agreement between a community college and the school district, during the regular school year, at or through community colleges
  • Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO),” allowing primarily 11th and 12th graders to take college and university courses which are not comparable to courses offered by the secondary institution or offered through concurrent enrollment at an eligible postsecondary institution as a part-time student
  • Courses offered through career academies for college credit
  • Project Lead the Way courses.
“Senior Year Plus” also includes requirements regarding Advanced Placement classes. Provisions specific to Advanced Placement are not listed in this profile.

Dual Enrollment refers to students enrolled in both competent private (i.e., homeschooled) and public instruction simultaneously. Students who are enrolled in college coursework while still in high school are categorized as jointly enrolled (i.e., Joint Enrollment).

An articulated course is offered by a high school through an agreement between a district and a postsecondary institution that allows students to receive college credit upon matriculation based on the demonstrated mastery of concepts in the high school course. (Iowa Admin. Code 281-22.32(8)(c))
Where courses provided District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academy, and Project Lead the Way:
  • At high school
  • At community college
  • Virtual program (e.g., Iowa Communications Network (ICN) or internet)
Postsecondary Enrollment Options:
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: Both, if course previously approved by the school board through annual approval process.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Both

Project Lead the Way: Both, if the course is offered through a community college. School districts may elect to offer a Project Lead the Way course as an articulated course, where the student will earn high school credit upon completion of the course and college credit upon matriculation (assuming requirements contained in the articulation agreements are met).
Students may take developmental/remedial courses through dual enrollment program No
CTE component Yes. Career and technical education courses are eligible under PSEO and district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment. A career academy course may qualify if it meets the requirements of a district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment program.
Unique characteristics All Senior Year Plus Programs: Students from accredited nonpublic schools and homeschooled students may access the program through the school district in which the accredited nonpublic school or private institution is located.

Institutions must ensure students have access to student support services, including but not limited to tutoring, counseling, advising, library, writing and math labs, and computer labs, and student activities, excluding postsecondary intercollegiate athletics. Statute provides funds (when appropriated by the general assembly) for the development of additional Internet-based Senior Year Plus courses.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Students from the Iowa School for the Deaf or the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School may also participate.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Postseconary Enrollment Options: Mandatory

Other Senior Year Plus programs (i.e., Concurrent Enrollment, Project Lead the Way, Career or Regional Academy programs): Voluntary. However, when a district offers another Senior Year Plus (SYP) program, eligible students must be allowed to participate (a district cannot place barriers to participation that are not contained within the legislation).

All programs: Eligible institutions must allow eligible students to participate.  Eligible institutions may not place restrictions on participation in SYP programming beyond those specified in statute or administrative rule.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academies, and Project Lead the Way: Two-year

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Both. An eligible accredited private institution may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements All Senior Year Plus programs (CTE exception cited below):
  • Written approval/recommendation. Student must have approval of the school board or its designee and the eligible postsecondary institution to register for the postsecondary course.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12 (Postsecondary Enrollment Options).
  • Other. Student must be proficient in reading, math, and science based on their performance on the Iowa Assessments. Proficiency scores for the Iowa Assessments are determined in the Standard Score metric (previously, students had to score at or above the 41st national percentile rank (NPR) in each of the three subject areas) specific to grade, content, and time of year (fall, midyear, and spring). If a student is not proficient in one or more of these content areas, the school board may establish alternative but equivalent qualifying performance measures including but not limited to additional administrations of the state assessment, portfolios of student work, student performance rubric, or end-of-course assessments.)
Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academies, Project Lead the Way: Open to students in grades 9-12.

District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: For a CTE course, a student is exempt from proficiency requirements, but may be required by a community college to complete an initial assessment to determine the applicant's readiness to enroll in career and technical coursework, and the community college may deny the enrollment.

Project Lead the Way: A school district may set additional eligibility requirements to ensure student readiness to achieve success. All students in a district-to-community college shared course must meet the expectations of the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program and must be registered for college credit.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes. A student may not be enrolled in more than 24 college credit hours at any one postsecondary institution during an academic year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment and Project Lead the Way: Yes. Notice of the availability of the program must be included in a school district's student registration handbook. The handbook must identify which courses, if successfully completed, generate college credit under the program. A student and the student's parent must also be made aware of this program as a part of the development of the student's core curriculum plan.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Yes. The availability and requirements of this program must be included in each school district's student registration handbook. Information about the program must be provided to the student and the student's parent prior to the development of the student's core curriculum plan.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for all Senior Year Plus programs. Statute provides for the development of an Internet-based information clearinghouse that allows students to identify participation options within the Senior Year Plus program and transferability between educational systems. The resource must provide links to other similar resources available through various Iowa postsecondary institution systems, and identify course transferability and articulation between the secondary and postsecondary systems in Iowa and between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student's district. However, the payment varies by Senior Year Plus (SYP) program:

Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO): A school district must pay a tuition reimbursement amount to a postsecondary institution that has enrolled its resident eligible students. For a student in an open enrollment situation, tuition is paid by the receiving district. The amount of tuition reimbursement for each separate course must equal the lesser of
  • The actual and customary costs of tuition, textbooks, materials, and fees directly related to the course taken by the eligible student
  • $250
An eligible postsecondary institution must make pro rata adjustments to tuition reimbursement amounts based on federal guidelines.

However, if the student fails to complete and receive credit for the course, the student or parent must reimburse the school district for its costs.

Postsecondary institutions may not charge students for textbooks, materials, or fees directly related to the course in which the student is enrolled except that the student may be required to purchase equipment that becomes the property of the student.

For students at the Iowa school for the deaf and the Iowa braille and sight saving school, the state board of regents must pay a tuition reimbursement amount by June 30 of each year.

Concurrent Enrollment: Districts that enter into a concurrent enrollment agreement are responsible for payment to the cooperating community college per the terms stipulated in their agreement. Districts are eligible to receive supplementary weighting for students enrolled in concurrent enrollment courses. As stipulated in statute, students enrolled in a qualifying concurrent enrollment course are assigned an additional weighting of .70 for career and technical courses and .46 for liberal arts and science courses.

All programs: Districts and eligible postsecondary institutions may not charge students for tuition.
How state funds participating high schools District-to-Community College or Concurrent Enrollment: Funded at a higher level. Students enrolled in eligible courses are given an additional weight of .70 for CTE courses and .46 for liberal arts and science courses. A career academy course may qualify as a concurrent enrollment course if it meets the criteria for district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment programs. A district is also eligible for supplemental funding for concurrent enrollment classes provided via the ICN, or for Project Lead the Way (PLTW) enrollment through sharing with a community college.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor qualifications component All Senior Year Plus Programs: Yes. Course instructors must meet the standards and requirements that other full-time instructors in the academic department are required to meet and that are approved by the appropriate postsecondary administration. Community colleges must report instructor degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards.

District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: Yes. For a district to be eligible for supplemental weighting for participating students, a class must be included in the community college catalog or an amendment or addendum to the catalog, and open to all registered community college students, not just high school students. (The class may be offered in a high school attendance center.) The course instructor must be employed or contracted by a community college. The course must be taught using the community college course syllabus, and taught in such a manner as to result in student work and student assessment that meet college-level expectations.

Project Lead the Way: Yes, A school district offering a Project Lead the Way program must offer the curriculum developed by the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program. An instructor must have successfully completed the training required by and meet the minimum requirements of the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program.
Program reporting requirement All Senior Year Plus programs: Yes. Postsecondary institutions must use the student’s K-12 unique student identifier as part of the institution's student data management system. Institutions must collect data and report to the department on the proportion of females and minorities enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-oriented educational opportunities provided through Senior Year Plus programs. The department must submit the programming data and the department's findings and recommendations in a report to the general assembly annually by January 15. (I.C.A. § 261E.3 (3)(j))

Legislation provides funds (when appropriated by the general assembly) for the development of a data management system, including a transcript repository, for Senior Year Plus programming. The data management system must include information generated by grade 8-12 core curriculum plan provisions, data on courses taken by Iowa students, and the transferability of course credit. (I.C.A. § 261E.13(1)(b)

Postsecondary Enrollment Options, District-to-Community College Sharing and Concurrent Enrollment: Community colleges must annually report to the department of education for the previous fiscal year:
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in community college courses through shared supplementary weighting plans
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in community college courses through shared supplementary weighting plans.
  • Total credits earned by high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program, broken down by vocational-technical or career program and arts and sciences program
  • Number of courses in which high school students are enrolled under shared supplementary weighting plans and the portions of those courses that are taught by an instructor who is employed by the local school district for a portion of the school day.
Postsecondary Enrollment Options: The board of regents (which oversees public four-year institutions) must annually report to the general assembly:
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control
  • Total credits earned by high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control, broken down by degree program.
District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment and Senior Year Plus: The state board, in collaboration with the board of directors of each community college, must adopt rules that clearly define data and information elements to be collected related to the programs. Data elements must include:
  • The course title and whether the course supplements, rather than supplants, a school district course
  • An unduplicated enrollment count of eligible students participating in the program
  • The actual costs and revenues generated for concurrent enrollment. An aligned unique student identifier system shall be established by the department for students in kindergarten through grade twelve and community college
  • Degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards
  • Salary information including regular contracted salary and total salary
  • Credit hours and laboratory contact hours and other data on instructional time
  • Other information comparable to the data regarding teachers collected in the basic education data survey.
Program evaluation component Yes. A Postsecondary Course Audit Committee annually audits postsecondary courses offered to high school students through district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment to ensure the quality of course offerings.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. However, legislation requires the creation of an Internet-based information clearinghouse that identifies Senior Year Plus program course transferability and articulation between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.

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