Voucher Programs: Voucher amount


Voucher Programs: Voucher amount

March 2017


The amount of money available through a voucher program for each student is often based on the state’s per-pupil amount from the funding formula. Many states set the voucher limit at the state’s per-pupil amount or the cost of private school tuition, whichever is less.
 

Voucher amount
Arkansas Succeed Scholarship Program
The state's per-pupil amount or the cost of private school tuition, whichever is less.
District of Columbia D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program
As last set in statute, up to $8,000 for grades K-8 and $12,000 for grades 9-12. However, the voucher amounts are adjusted for inflation based on the Consumer Price Index and the organization administering the program may award scholarships in larger amounts to students with the greatest need. 
Florida John M. McKay Scholarship for Students with Disabilities Program
Equivalent to the amount a school district would receive for the student or the amount of the private school tuition, whichever is less.
Georgia Georgia Special Needs Scholarship Program
Equivalent to the amount a school district would receive for the student or the amount of private school tuition, whichever is less.
Indiana Choice Scholarship Program
The lesser of the following:
  • Private school tuition.
  • 90 percent of the state's per-pupil amount for students eligible for free and reduced price meal programs.
  • 50 percent of the state's per-pupil amount for students with household incomes at or above 150 percent of the eligibility requirements for free and reduced price meal programs.
Louisiana School Choice Program for Certain Students with Exceptionalities
Equivalent to 50 percent of the state's per-pupil amount or the amount of tuition, whichever is less.
Louisiana Student Scholarships for Educational Excellence
The state's per-pupil amount or the amount of tuition and fees, whichever is less.

Private schools with a demonstrated capacity for offering needed special education services may charge higher tuition for students needing those services, up to the cost of providing those services in a public school. 
Maine Town Tuitioning
Elementary school: 
1. For students attending a public school in another district as a tuition student, the school district's per-pupil cost for the preceding school year, although the sending school district may approve a higher tuition rate with a vote.
2. Private school tuition may not exceed the average per-pupil cost in all public elementary schools in the state for the previous school year.

High school: 
1. For students attending a public school in another district as a tuition student, whichever is less of the state's per-student amount or an amount determined by a statutory formula, although the sending school district may approve a higher tuition rate with a vote.
2. For students attending a private school, whichever is less of the state's per-student amount or an amount determined by a statutory formula. Tuition also includes an insured value factor as outlined in statute. Private schools may also charge tuition up to 15 percent above the allowed amount in some circumstances.
Maryland Broadening Options and Opportunities for Students Today Program
The state's per-pupil amount or the amount of school tuition, whichever is less. The BOOST Advisory Board determines award amounts.
Mississippi Mississippi Dyslexia Therapy Scholarship for Students with Dyslexia
The state's base student cost. Participating private schools must report the number of scholarship students to the state each year to determine funding for the next year.
Mississippi Nate Rogers Scholarship for Students with Disabilities / Mississippi Speech-Language Therapy Scholarship for Students with Speech-Language Impairments
The state's base student cost. Participating private schools must report the number of scholarship students to the state each year to determine funding for the next year.
North Carolina Opportunity Scholarship
Students with household incomes at or below the income guidelines for free or reduced-price meal programs: $4,200 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less.

Students with household incomes above the income guidelines for free or reduced-price meal programs: 90 percent of the school's tuition and fees, up to $4,200.
North Carolina Special Education Scholarships for Children with Disabilities
$4,000 per semester, or $8,000 per year.

In addition, parents may apply to be reimbursed for certain, pre-approved special education services if the student has received at least 75 days of special education services.
Ohio Autism Scholarship Program
$27,000 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less. 
Ohio Cleveland Scholarship Program
Private School
K-8: $4,250 or the cost of tuition, whichever is less.
9-12: $5,700 or the cost of tuition, whichever is less. 
The state provides additional funds for students with disabilities. 

Tutoring
$400 per year.
 
Ohio EdChoice Expansion Program
K-8: $4,650 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less.
9-12: $6,000 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less.

Under the expansion program, students with household incomes at or below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines may not be charged a tuition fee more than the voucher amount. Eligible students with household incomes from 200 to 400 percent of federal poverty guidelines receive reduced voucher amounts as follows:
  • Above 200 percent and below 300 percent: 75 percent of the voucher amount.
  • Above 300 percent and below 400 percent: 50 percent of the voucher amount. 
Ohio Educational Choice Scholarship Program
K-8: $4,650 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less. 
9-12: $6,000 per year or the cost of tuition, whichever is less. 
Ohio Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program
The lesser of the following:
  • Private school tuition.
  • $27,000 per year.
  • The student's per-pupil amount. 
Oklahoma Lindsey Nicole Henry Scholarship for Students with Disabilities Program
The state's per-pupil amount, including grade and disability weights for the applicable school year, or the amount of the private school's tuition and fees, whichever is less.

The state may retain 2.5 percent of the voucher amount for administrative services.  
Utah Carson Smith Scholarships for Students with Special Needs
The voucher amount or the cost of private school tuition and fees, whichever is less. Voucher amounts are based on the state's per-pupil amount and weighted based on what grade the student is in and if the student receives more than or less than 180 minutes of special education services per day. 
Vermont Town Tuitioning
Elementary school students
Whichever is less of:
  • The state's per-pupil amount.
  • The average per-pupil amount the district pays for its other elementary or high school students enrolled in private schools.
  • Private school tuition.
However, the district may also pay a higher amount if approved by the electorate.

High school students
The average amount the district pays for it students enrolled in private schools or a higher amount that is approved by the electorate.

Students needing special education services
Private schools may establish a different tuition amount for students needing special education services, but only if the State Board of Education allows for the type of program or services.
 
Wisconsin Milwaukee Parental Choice Program
K-8: $7,210 or private school tuition, whichever is less.
9-12: $7,856 or private school tuition, whichever is less.
Wisconsin Racine Parental Private School Choice Program
K-8: $7,210 or private school tuition, whichever is less.
9-12: $7,856 or private school tuition, whichever is less.
Wisconsin Special Needs Scholarship Program
The amount adjusts each year depending on changes to the state's funding levels.
Wisconsin Wisconsin Parental Choice Program
K-8: $7,210 or private school tuition, whichever is less.
9-12: $7,856 or private school tuition, whichever is less.

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