Advanced Placement Policies: All State Profiles

Advanced Placement Policies: All State Profiles


This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

Alabama
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $5 in spring 2016 after state, federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. ACCESS (Alabama Connecting Classrooms, Educators & Students Statewide) is an initiative of the Alabama Department of Education, offering a number of online AP courses. As of the 2015-16 school year, any Alabama public high school student is eligible to request free ACCESS distance learning courses.

In addition, the department of education must work with local public school systems that have the lowest four-year graduation rates. The department must develop specific methods of targeted intervention or identify appropriate existing methods for local public school systems that have a four-year graduation rate less than the percentage as determined by the State Board of Education. These interventions may include increased availability of AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Alaska
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Arizona
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Based on the amount of federal funding available, it is estimated that the cost per AP exam for low-income students, for exams taken during the 2015-2016 academic year, will be $15 - pending an award from the U.S. Department of Education for the AP Test Fee Waiver Program.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes. The Arizona Board of Regent’s High Honors Tuition Scholarship is a 25% in-state university base tuition scholarship valid at state universities. Eligible students must meet three sets of criteria:
  • Complete all 16 Core Competency Courses by graduation with a B or better in each unit of credit awarded OR receive an acceptable score on the AP exam or a 4 on the IB exam for that subject area.
  • Unweighted GPA of 3.50 in all 16 core competency courses, or equivalent on 5.0 scale for districts weighting AP/IB/honors courses OR top 5% in high school graduating class
  • Minimum 28 composite score on ACT OR 1300 on the SAT1 test (critical reading & math only – excluding writing and essay).
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The state board is required, in consultation with the community college districts, to develop and implement common equivalencies for specific levels of achievement on AP exams, in order to award commensurate postsecondary academic credits at community colleges and public universities in the state.

In practice, while most Arizona 2- and 4-year institutions award credit for AP exam scores, not all exams are recognized for credit (or for non-elective credit) at all institutions.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Arkansas
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. All high schools must offer at least 4 AP courses. All districts must offer 1 AP course in each of 4 areas: English, math, science and social studies. These offerings must be phased in over a 4-year period beginning in the 2005-2006 school year. Unlike districts, however, high schools are not required to offer courses in specific subject areas.

Districts must also offer pre-AP courses.

Any high school offering the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is exempt from the requirement to offer AP courses. 
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Contingent upon legislative appropriations, schools participating in the Arkansas Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Diploma Incentive Program may be awarded a one-time equipment and instructional materials grant for providing an AP course. A school may apply for a one-time equipment grant for each AP course. (Two sections of a course such as AP U.S. History would be considered as one course. Districts with more than one high school providing AP courses may apply for the one-time equipment grants for each high school.

In addition, depending on the availability of funds, schools may be awarded up to $50 for each score of ≥ 3 earned on any AP exam. A school must utilize such funds in the school's AP program. An annual report with detailed expenditures of funds awarded to schools from students' AP exam scores must be submitted to the Office of Gifted and Talented, Arkansas Department of Education.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. Districts must annually report by grade level, economic status, and ethnicity: 
  • The number of students taking AP courses
  • The number taking the AP exams
  • The percent of students earning a 3, 4, or 5 on AP exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. AP teachers must meet Arkansas Teacher Licensure requirements and attend a College Board Advanced Placement Summer Institute. Teachers must attend no less than once every 5 years. An AP teacher who has not obtained this required training must complete an Additional Training Plan (ATP) for Advanced Placement. The teacher will have 3 years to complete the required training. Pre-AP teachers must also meet Arkansas Teacher Licensure requirements and attend a College Board sponsored or endorsed training institute or workshop in the teacher's content area at least once every 5 years. A pre-AP teacher who has not obtained the required training must complete an ATP for Pre-Advanced Placement. The teacher will have 3 years to complete the required training.

Subject to legislative appropriations, a teacher participating in the AP or pre-AP program may be awarded subsidized AP teacher training of up to $650 per teacher. Specifically, an AP or pre-AP teacher may apply to the department for a grant of up to $650 to cover cost of tuition, expenses and materials of approved training programs. Priority for training will be given to teachers who have not been previously trained. When a district offers a pre-AP program, the courses must follow a clearly recognizable sequence, i.e., 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th grade Pre-AP English, 11th grade AP English Language and Composition, and 12th grade English Literature and Composition. A teacher who is assigned to teach more than one AP or pre-AP course may apply for more than one teacher training stipend, contingent upon appropriated funding.

For purposes of continuing education and professional development requirements, each hour of AP training received by licensed personnel must be counted as professional development up to 30 hours.

In addition, the Advanced Placement Training Incentive and Program is to:
  • Provide AP content directors to work, mentor, and provide resources to AP and pre-AP teachers in math, science, and English
  • Provide nationally recognized professional development for AP and pre-AP teachers that will enhance the teachers' knowledge and pedagogical skills
  • Develop and provide materials and resources for AP and pre-AP teachers.
The department of education must provide grant funding to organizations that implement measures to achieve the goals of the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program. An organization receiving grant funding to implement the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program must be affiliated with the National Math and Science Initiative, and have demonstrated success with an Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program. An organization receiving grant funding to provide the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program may:
  • Develop public-private partnerships to advance math and science learning opportunities
  • Generate revenue from public or private sector entities to support other opportunities
  • Accept grants, donations, gifts, or bequests.
One of purposes of the Arkansas Smart Core Incentive Funding Program is to promote programs that contribute to student success, including professional development for AP instruction.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Statute provides that, contingent upon legislative appropriation and the availability of funding, the state may pay AP test fees in full, or on a pro rata basis, and authorizes the state board to create a sliding scale for test fee coverage, based on family income.

The state will cover AP exam fees for low-income and non-low-income students in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute establishes the Arkansas Council on Postsecondary and Career Readiness, which includes representatives of K-12 and higher education. One of the charges to the council is to support college and career readiness standards that promote accelerated learning opportunities, including AP.

In addition, any public school, education service cooperative, or institution of higher education is authorized to enter into one or more interlocal agreements through which they collaborate to improve public school performance and academic achievement. Each interlocal agreement must establish an education renewal zone. The partners within a specific education renewal zone must develop a strategic plan that provides for enhancement and expansion of local curricular offerings through the use of two-way interactive television to include AP, dual-credit, and advanced high school courses.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Districts must offer pre-AP courses to prepare students for the demands of AP coursework. The department of education must approve all classes designated as pre-AP courses.

Statute defines “vertical team” as a group of educators from different grade levels in a given discipline who work cooperatively to develop and implement a vertically aligned program aimed at helping students from diverse backgrounds acquire the academic skills necessary for success in the AP program and other challenging coursework. Statute requires AP and pre-AP teachers to obtain College Board sponsored or endorsed training, and provides this may include vertical team training.

Subject to legislative appropriations, a pre-AP teacher may be awarded subsidized AP teacher training of up to $650 per teacher.

In addition, the stated goals of the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program are to:
  • Increase the number of students enrolled in AP math, science, and English
  • Increase the number of students who score ≥ 3 on AP exams
  • Reduce participation and performance gaps in AP classes between African-American, Hispanic, and Caucasian students
  • Help public high schools develop strong and successful AP programs
  • Enhance and augment AP policies and initiatives in Arkansas
  • Provide Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Programs in every public high school that elects to participate and strengthen its AP program
  • Increase the number of students prepared to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields in higher education or related training and occupations.
Statute provides that the primary purpose of providing distance learning technologies is to assist districts in receiving advanced high school courses, AP courses, enriched course content, or other academic courses not otherwise available in the school district.

To the extent sufficient funding is available, qualified individuals and districts may enter into an agreement to provide traveling teacher services for one or more receiving districts to offer courses required by the Standards for Accreditation of Arkansas Public Schools and School Districts and any AP courses high schools and districts are required by statute to offer:
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, a student may receive weighted credit for an AP course only if: 
  • The student takes the entire AP course
  • The student completes the applicable AP exam at the end of the AP course
  • The teacher of the AP course meets Arkansas teacher licensure requirements and
    • Attends a College Board AP Summer Institute at least once every 5 years; or
    • Completes an additional training plan for AP within 3 years of commencing the additional training plan.

California
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: Each district is required to adopt a local control and accountability plan that includes, for the district and for each school in the district, a description of the annual goals, for all pupils and each subgroup of pupils, to be achieved for each of the state priorities enumerated in statute, including among others, the percentage of students who have earned a ≥ 3 on an AP exam.

Reporting: School accountability report cards must include the number of AP courses offered, by subject.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute requests the Regents of the University of California to develop the High School Mathematics Professional Development Institutes jointly with the Trustees of California State University and the independent colleges and universities. The institutes must provide research-based instruction in the teaching of mathematics, and that includes instruction that will enhance the ability of teachers to prepare students for AP and college coursework.
State subsidies for testing fees No. However, statute provides that a district may help pay for all or part of the costs of one or more AP exams that are charged to economically disadvantaged students. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $5 per exam in spring 2016 after federal, College Board, and local grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute requests the Regents of the University of California to develop the High School Mathematics Professional Development Institutes jointly with the Trustees of California State University and the independent colleges and universities. The institutes must provide research-based instruction in the teaching of mathematics, and that includes instruction that will enhance the ability of teachers to prepare students for AP and college coursework.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The superintendent of public instruction must annually update the AP information available on the department of education website to include current information on the various means available to school districts to offer or access AP courses, including online courses. The superintendent must annually inform high schools that offer AP courses in fewer than five subjects of the various options for making AP and other rigorous courses available to students.

In addition, at the beginning of the regular school term, district boards must notify parents of minor students of specific parental rights or responsibilities, including advising the parent of the availability of state funds to cover AP exam fees.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The University of California and California State University systems both award postsecondary credit for AP exam scores of ≥ 3.

In addition, a spring 2016 resolution of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges encourages local senates and curriculum committees to work with discipline faculty to regularly review processes and practices for awarding credit for AP scores, to ensure that students receive all proper credit and are not required to duplicate coursework. Regulation directs the governing board of each community college district to adopt and publish policies and procedures pertaining to credit by exam, and authorizes the governing board of a community college district to adopt policies to grant credit for satisfactory completion of AP exams. 

The faculty in the appropriate discipline must approve AP exams, scores deemed to constitute satisfactory performance, courses offered by the college for which credit will be granted, and requirements that may be met by such examinations in accordance with policies and procedures approved by the curriculum committee.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics  In determining the appropriate educational placement of foster youth students, local educational agencies, county welfare agencies, and county probation departments must consult with an educational rights holder, caregiver, social worker, teacher, counselor, court-appointed special advocate, other stakeholders, and the student, as appropriate. The purpose of the consultation is to ensure all educational programmatic options are considered, including Advanced Placement options.

A test agency must immediately initiate an investigation upon learning of a complaint or a notice of inadequate or improper test conditions relating to an administration of an AP test. To expedite the investigation and ensure a timely resolution, the school in charge of the test site must cooperate with the test agency's investigation by providing information requested by the test agency within 5 business days. If, upon completing the investigation, the test agency determines that the inadequate or improper test conditions will prevent it from reporting valid test scores, the test agency must notify the school in charge of the test site of the decision within 2 business days. Upon notification from the test agency that the inadequate or improper test conditions will prevent it from reporting valid test scores, the school in charge of the test site must notify the affected test subjects of the decision within 2 business days. The school in charge of the test site must provide all affected test subjects with at least 5 business days' prior notice of an opportunity to retest. That retest must be administered within 30 calendar days of the completion of the investigation.

AP exam proctors must create a seating chart, including the seat location of each test subject, for each AP test administered at the test site. The test agency must provide seating chart templates for use by each test site. The school in charge of the test site must retain and preserve each such seating chart for at least one year after the administration of the AP test to which that seating chart applies. The school in charge of the test site must submit these seating charts to the test agency upon its request to assist with its investigation of a complaint or notice of inadequate or improper test conditions.

Colorado
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. The Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program established in 2014 is intended to expand access to AP classes in rural schools and enhance the participation in AP programs by students participating in the school lunch program. 

Regardless of the outcome of the AP exams taken, for each student who completes an AP class and who subsequently takes the AP exam, the department must distribute to the rural school $500 to be used for various purposes, including among others:
  • Implementing a school-wide AP program, including enhancing online access for rural schools with limited access
  • Providing an AP teacher or mentor a bonus of $50 for each student who completes the teacher's or mentor's AP class and takes the AP exam; except that teacher or mentor may not receive more than $2,000 per year in such bonuses.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School performance reports must include information on the availability of AP, IB and honors courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program established in 2014 is intended to expand access to AP classes in rural schools and enhance the participation in AP programs by students participating in the school lunch program. Regardless of the outcome of the AP exams taken, for each student who completes an AP class and who subsequently takes the AP exam, the department must distribute to the rural school $500 to be used for various purposes, including providing professional development to assist teachers in learning instructional strategies for teaching AP classes and bolstering AP content knowledge

Program funds may also be used to provide professional development for administrators concerning the content required in non-AP classes to help students prepare for future success in AP classes.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program established in 2014 is intended to expand access to AP classes in rural schools and enhance the participation in AP programs by students participating in the school lunch program. The program is annually limited to the first 475 students from rural schools.

Regardless of the outcome of the AP exams taken, for each student who completes an AP class and who subsequently takes the AP exam, the department must distribute to the rural school $500 to be used for various purposes, including paying the AP exam fee for each student who takes the AP exam and participates in the school lunch program, unless the exam fee is covered by a federal grant program.

In addition, while not state funded, ESCAPE (Eliminating Student Cost for Advanced Placement Exams), funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides the Colorado Department of Education with funds to pay the AP exam fees of low-income students in applicant school districts.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program established in 2014 is intended to expand access to AP classes in rural schools and enhance the participation in AP programs by students participating in the school lunch program. Only rural schools may participate in the pilot program, which is annually limited to the first 475 students from rural schools.

Eligible rural schools must:
  • Require all 10th graders to take a precollegiate entrance exam to help identify students with the potential to pass an AP exam
  • Have an AP program with at least one AP class in the area of math, social studies, science, or English. A rural school or rural school district may offer an AP class or program online. If a class is offered online, the school or district must designate an on-site mentor for student support. The mentor is eligible for the teacher incentives provided for below.
Regardless of the outcome of the AP exams taken, for each student who completes an AP class and who subsequently takes the AP exam, the department must distribute to the rural school $500 to be used for:
  • Implementing a school-wide AP program, including enhancing online access for rural schools with limited access
  • Providing professional development to assist teachers in learning instructional strategies for teaching AP classes and bolstering AP content knowledge
  • Providing professional development for administrators concerning the content required in non-AP classes to help students prepare for future success in AP classes
  • Paying the AP exam fee for each student who takes the AP exam and participates in the school lunch program, unless the exam fee is covered by a federal grant program
  • Providing an AP teacher or mentor a bonus of $50 for each student who completes the teacher's or mentor's AP class and takes the AP exam; except that teacher or mentor may not receive more than $2,000 per year in such bonuses.
The pilot is repealed July 1, 2018.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The Colorado Commission on Higher Education has established AP exam cut scores that fulfill GT Pathways General Education Credit requirements (effective for new students starting class on or after July 1, 2016).
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Connecticut
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Each local and regional board of education must provide an advanced placement course program.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. One of the indicators for high school accountability is the percentage of students in grades 11 and 12 achieving a college- and career-readiness benchmark on any of the following: 
  • ≥ 3 on AP exam
  • ≥ 4 on IB exam 
  • Smarter Balanced – Level 3 or higher on both ELA and math
  • SAT – composite score of ≥ 1550
  • ACT – meeting benchmark on 3 of 4 exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute directs the State Board of Education to develop guidelines to aid local and regional boards of education in training teachers for teaching AP courses to a diverse student body.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $0 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Legislation requires the Department of Education to biennally report to the General Assembly's  joint standing committee on education on on the number of school governance councils. By December 2017, and biennally thereafter, the report must include an evaluation of those schools that have reconstituted. The report must determine whether such schools have demonstrated progress with regard to 10 indicators, including, for high schools, the number and percentage of students completing AP coursework.

Delaware
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. College Board waivers or other grants must be identified as well as the procedures for applying and the procedures for the awarding of such funds or waivers. No student may be denied access to dual credit courses, including AP, because of the student's or family's inability to pay.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. For each low-income student, Delaware will provide $2 per exam. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $5 in spring 2016 after state, federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. All students must be provided information regarding dual enrollment and the awarding of dual credit opportunities, including AP.

​College Board waivers or other grants must be identified as well as the procedures for applying and the procedures for the awarding of such funds or waivers. No student may be denied access to dual credit courses, including AP, because of the student's or family's inability to pay.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Dual enrollment and dual credit, including AP, must be included in the Student Success Plan (SSP), for students electing to participate.

All AP courses used for purposes of Dual Credit must meet the requirements of their respective program authorizers.

District of Columbia
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. At least 4 AP courses are offered at each traditional high school.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $53 in spring 2016 after College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Florida
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, each high school must offer an IB Program, an Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) Program, or a combination of at least 4 courses in dual enrollment or AP, including one course each in English, math, science, and social studies. To meet this requirement, school districts may provide courses through virtual instruction, if the virtual course significantly integrates postsecondary level content for which a student may earn college credit, as determined by the department of education, and for which a standardized end-of-course assessment, as approved by the department, is administered.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. For every student in each AP course who scores ≥ 3 on the prior year's exam, a district is calculated a .16 full-time equivalent (FTE) student membership, to be added to the to the total FTE student membership for grades 9-12 for the subsequent fiscal year. Each district must allocate at least 80% of the funds provided to the district for AP instruction to the high school that generates the funds.

The school district must distribute to each classroom teacher who provided AP instruction:
1. A $50 bonus for each student taught by the AP teacher in each AP course who receives a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exam.
2. An additional bonus of $500 to each AP teacher in a school designated with a grade of “D” or “F” who has at least one student scoring ≥ 3 on the AP exam, regardless of the number of classes taught or of the number of students scoring a ≥ 3 or higher on the AP exam.

Bonuses awarded to a teacher according to these provisions not exceed $2,000 in any given school year. However, the maximum bonus is $3,000 if at least 50% of the students enrolled in a teacher's course earn a score of ≥ 3 on the exam in a school with a grade of “A,” “B,” or “C” or if at least 25% of the students enrolled in a teacher's course earn a score of ≥ 3 on the exam in a school with a grade of “D” or “F.” Bonuses awarded under these provisions are in addition to any regular wage or other bonus the teacher received or is scheduled to receive. For such courses, the teacher must earn an additional bonus of $50 for each student who has a qualifying score up to the maximum of $3,000 in any given school year.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. In calculating a high school's school grade, a school earns up to 100 points based on the percentage of graduates from the graduation rate who were eligible to earn college and career credit through AP exams, International Baccalaureate examinations, dual enrollment courses, or Advanced International Certificate of Education examinations; or who, at any time during high school, earned national industry certification identified in the CAPE Industry Certification Funding List.

In addition, each district identified as high-performing must submit an annual report to the state board and the legislature that includes the number and percentage of students taking an AP exam, and longitudinal performance of students who take an AP exam by demographic group (specifically, age, gender, race, and Hispanic origin, and by participation in the National School Lunch Program).

A district school board may operate an innovation school of technology for the purpose of developing the innovative use of industry-leading technology while requiring high student academic achievement and accountability in exchange for flexibility and exemption from specified statutes and rules. Similarly to high-performing districts, the school district of an innovation school of technology must submit a report to the state board and legislative leadership the number and percentage of students who take an AP exam, and longitudinal performance for students who take an AP exam, organized by age, gender, and race, and for students who participate in the National School Lunch Program.

Further, the department of education must develop an evaluation method for each provider of part-time virtual instruction that includes the percentage of students taking AP exams, and percentage of students scoring ≥ 3 on an AP exam.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement program offers AP teacher training to those specific, targeted districts and schools served by the Partnership each year. Program funding does not include every school and all districts. The program provides teachers of AP or other advanced courses with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success on AP or other advanced course exams and mastery of postsecondary course content.

The partnership must annually submit to the department a report that contains an evaluation of the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities. The evaluation must include the number of middle and high school teachers trained, and the effectiveness of the training.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $53 for all but AP Research and AP Seminar exams in spring 2016, after College Board grants are applied. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $100 for each AP Research and AP Seminar Exam in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute directs the levels of postsecondary education to collaborate in further developing and providing articulated programs in which students can proceed toward their educational objectives as rapidly as their circumstances permit. Time-shortened programs, as well as the use of acceleration mechanisms, must include AP.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Florida Virtual School, the country’s first statewide Internet-based public high school, offers AP courses.

Subject to a legislative appropriation, all public high schools administer the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), or ACT Aspire to all 10th grade students (parents may exempt their children from taking the PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Aspire). Test results provide each high school with a database of student assessment data that certified school counselors use to identify students who are prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in AP courses or other advanced high school courses.

The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement must additionally: 
  • Provide professional development to middle school teachers and administrators that will enable them to educate middle school students at the level necessary to prepare the students to enter high school ready to participate in advanced courses.
  • Provide assessment of individual strengths and weaknesses as related to potential success in AP or other advanced courses and readiness for college.
  • Provide a plan for communication and coordination of efforts with the Florida Virtual School's provision of online AP or other advanced courses.
  • Work with school districts to identify minority and underrepresented students for participation in AP or other advanced courses.
  • Work with school districts to provide information to students and parents that explains available opportunities for students to take AP and other advanced courses and that explains enrollment procedures that students must follow to enroll in such courses. 
  • Provide information to students, parents, teachers, counselors, administrators, districts, Florida College System institutions, and state universities regarding PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Aspire, including the value of student scores in predicting the probability of success on AP or other advanced course exams.
The partnership must submit to the department a report that contains an evaluation of the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities. Activities and services must be evaluated on their effectiveness at raising student achievement and increasing the number of AP or other advanced course exams in low-performing middle and high schools, including measures of postsecondary readiness of the students affected by the program.

Each high school must advise each student of courses through which a high school student can earn college credit, including AP.

Each middle grade student's personalized academic and career plan must inform students of available opportunities to earn college credit in high school, including via AP.

At the beginning of each school year, districts must notify parents of students in or entering high school of the opportunity and benefits of AP, IB, Advanced International Certificate of Education, dual enrollment, and Florida Virtual School courses and options for early graduation.

To facilitate meaningful parent and family involvement, the department of education must develop guidelines for a parent guide to successful student achievement which describes what parents need to know about their child's educational progress and how they can help their child to succeed in school. The guidelines must include opportunities for parents to learn about rigorous academic programs that may be available for their child, including AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The department of education must annually publish the minimum scores, maximum credit, and course or courses for which credit is to be awarded for each AP exam.  The department shall use student performance data in subsequent postsecondary courses to determine the appropriate examination scores and courses for which credit is to be granted. Minimum scores may vary by subject area based on available performance data. In addition, the department shall identify such courses in the general education core curriculum of each state university and Florida College System institution.

The specific courses for which students receive such credit must be identified in the statewide articulation agreement.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eligibility criteria for special academic programs, including AP, offered through public schools must be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. If such a program is offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned, the student's parent must assume responsibility for transporting the student to that school.

Georgia
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. The College and Career Ready Performance Index for High Schools includes indicators students may meet by AP participation and performance:
  • Percent of graduates completing a CTAE pathway, or an advanced academic pathway, or an IB Career Related Programme, or a fine arts pathway, or a world language pathway within their program of study
  • Percent of graduates entering TCSG/USG not requiring remediation or learning support courses; or scoring program ready on the Compass; or scoring at least 22 out of 36 on the composite ACT; or scoring at least 1550 out of 2400 on the combined SAT; or scoring 3 or higher on two or more AP exams; or scoring 4 or higher on two or more IB exams
  • Percent of graduates earning high school credit(s) for accelerated enrollment via ACCEL, Dual HOPE Grant, Move On When Ready, Early College, Gateway to College, AP or IB courses.
In addition, since 2008 the Georgia Department of Education has recognized AP Honor Schools. AP Honor Schools are recognized in six categories, based on AP performance during the prior school year:
  • AP Challenge Schools are schools with enrollments of 900 or fewer students and students testing in four of the core areas (English, math, science, and social studies)
  • AP Access and Support Schools are schools with at least 30 percent of their AP exams taken by students who identified themselves as African-American and/or Hispanic, and 30 percent of all AP exams earning scores of 3 or higher
  • AP Merit Schools are schools with at least 20 percent of the student population taking AP exams and at least 50 percent of all AP exams earning scores of 3 or higher
  • AP STEM Schools are schools with students testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses (AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics B, AP Physics C, AP Computer Science)
  • AP STEM Achievement Schools are schools with students testing in at least two AP math courses and two AP science courses, and at least 40 percent of the exam scores on AP math and AP science exams earning scores of 3 or higher
  • AP Humanities Schools are schools with students testing in all of the following AP courses: at least one ELA course, two social sciences courses, one fine arts course and one world language course. 
In addition, pending ratification of an amendment to the constitution at the November 2016 general election, a local school system that has requested flexibility may operate on a waiver from state accountability requirements and enter into a performance contract with the state board. The accountability component of the contract must include at least one of the following student achievement measures, including both total scores and any needed targeted subgroups:
  • High school graduation rates
  • SAT or ACT performance
  • State standardized test data, which may include end-of-grade assessments, end-of-course assessments, or a combination thereof
  • AP or IB participation and performance.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Georgia Department of Education hosted 7 AP Regional Workshops in fall 2015.  These workshops are specific to course and there was no registration fee. 
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The state pays for one AP exam (at the College Board reduced fee rate of $53.00) for all qualifying low-income students. 
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Not for AP exam scores. However, to be eligible to receive a HOPE scholarship, a student must receive credit in at least 3 courses prior to graduating from high school from any of 6 categories of advanced coursework, including AP courses in core subjects. Effective for students in the Class of 2017, this requirement increases to credit in at least 4 advanced courses, including AP courses in core subjects.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. All University System of Georgia institutions award credit for minimum AP exam scores. All Technical College System of Georgia institutions award credit to students who have taken appropriate courses in high school and achieved AP exam scores of ≥ 3.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Hawaii
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. As of spring 2016, the Hawaii Department of Education's E-School offers AP courses. Courses taken during the regular school year are free. 
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Idaho
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all high schools must either offer "advanced opportunities," (defined as AP courses, dual credit courses, Tech Prep, or IB programs), or provide opportunities for students to take courses at the postsecondary campus.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. Idaho's ESEA waiver establishes a Point Matrix for Advanced Education Opportunities (i.e., AP, IB, dual credit or Tech Prep), with varying numbers of points awarded a school based on the percentage of students completing the Advanced Opportunity with a "C" or better.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Public school students are eligible for $4,125 to use toward overload courses, dual credits, college credit-bearing examinations and professional certificate exams in grades 7-12. A student must take and successfully be completing a full credit load within a given school year to be eligible for funding of an overload course. Eligible overload course exams include AP exams. Application of these funds for overload courses may not exceed $225 per overload course.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The My Idaho Courses portal, supported by the Idaho Department of Education, offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The state provides an appropriation to defray dual credit and AP exam costs for 11th and 12th graders. Statute directs the state department to annually report to the house and senate education committees on the number of students benefitting from assistance with the cost of dual credit courses and exams, the number of credits awarded and amounts paid during the previous school year.

In addition, LEAs are required to annually report to the State Department of Education number of students in each school and for the LEA participating in Advanced Placement courses.

Illinois
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Regulation provides for AP grant funds to serve students and staff in schools where at least 40% of the students are classified as “low-income”. Funds may be used to purchase materials related to AP courses, among other purposes.

In addition, statute directs the state board to:
  • Seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement Incentive Program and the Math-Science Partnership Program and use it to support AP and pre-AP teacher professional development and to support the implementation of an integrated instructional program for students in grades 6-12 in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college
  • Focus state and federal funding with the intent to carry out activities that target school districts serving high concentrations of low-income students.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School and district accountability report cards must include AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Subject to appropriation, an AP teacher must obtain appropriate training. Subject to appropriation, the state board must establish clear, specific, and challenging training guidelines that require AP teachers to obtain recognized College Board-endorsed AP training.

AP and pre-AP teacher training must do all of the following:
  • Provide AP teachers and teachers in courses that lead to AP with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced course examinations and mastery of postsecondary course content
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools
  • Provide middle, junior high, and high school teachers with AP Vertical Team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for success in AP courses.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
Regulation governing AP teacher training provides for AP grant funds to be expended only to serve students and staff in schools where at least 40% of the students are classified as “low-income”. Purposes for which grant funds may be used include curriculum development and staff training. At least 20%of the funding provided for each program must be used to defray the cost of College Board-sponsored training for teachers, counselors, and principals. Costs for other professional development activities that correspond to the purposes in the bullets above must be allowable beyond the 20% threshold. Training costs may include stipends for those participating and for substitute teachers.

Grant proposals must be evaluated with up to 45 points awarded for "Quality and Scope of the Plan", including:
  • The proposal demonstrates that the training to be funded and the staff members to be involved will permit the district to offer AP courses or preparatory programs that are not currently available, or that greater numbers of students will have access to AP courses or preparatory programs.
  • The proposal includes plans for support for and collaboration among staff members and administrators that will result in the sequential alignment of rigorous course offerings across grade levels, culminating in AP studies.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Subject to appropriation, the state board of education must create, under the College and Career Success for All Students program, a program in public schools where at least 40% of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches whereby fees charged by the College Board for AP exams are waived by the school, but paid for by the state, for those students who do not qualify for a fee waiver provided by federal funds or the College Board.

Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state board must encourage districts to offer rigorous courses in grades 6-11 that prepare students for the demands of AP coursework. The state board must also encourage districts to make it a goal that all 10th graders take the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholars Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) so that test results will provide each high school with a database of student assessment data that guidance counselors and teachers will be able to use to identify students who are prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in AP courses, using a research-based AP identification program provided by the College Board.

In addition, the state board must:
  • Seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement Incentive Program and the Math-Science Partnership Program and use it to support AP and pre-AP teacher professional development and to support the implementation of an integrated instructional program for students in grades 6-12 in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college. 
  • Focus state and federal funding with the intent to carry out activities that target school districts serving high concentrations of low-income students
  • Subject to appropriation, provide a plan of communication that includes disseminating materials to parents that emphasize the importance of AP or other advanced courses to a student's ability to gain access to and to succeed in postsecondary education and materials that emphasize the importance of the PSAT/NMSQT, which provides diagnostic feedback on skills and relates student scores to the probability of success in AP courses and examinations, and disseminating this information to students, teachers, counselors, administrators, school districts, public community colleges, and state universities.
The Illinois Virtual School offers AP courses.

Regulation provides for AP grant funds to be expended only to serve students and staff in schools where at least 40% of the students are classified as “low-income”. Allowable activities include, in grades 6-11, initiatives and coursework designed to prepare students for enrollment and success in AP courses (“preparatory programs”). Some portion of the funding provided for each proposed program must be devoted to strategies and activities specifically designed to increase the participation of low-income students in AP courses or to promote participation by low-income students in preparatory programs, such as:
  • Development and dissemination of promotional materials or other outreach to students and their families
  • Counseling, enrichment, tutoring, or other assistance for students that will prepare them to succeed in these courses and on the culminating exams
  • Administering the Pre-Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) to students.
Grant applications must be evaluated in accordance with the following criteria:
1) Quality and Scope of the Plan (45 points)
A) The proposal demonstrates that the training to be funded and the staff members to be involved will permit the district to offer AP courses or preparatory programs that are not currently available, or that greater numbers of students will have access to AP courses or preparatory programs, as applicable.
B) The proposal includes plans for support for and collaboration among staff members and administrators that will result in the sequential alignment of rigorous course offerings across grade levels, culminating in AP studies.
C) The proposal demonstrates that the activities and materials to be supported with grant funds will enhance students' preparedness for AP courses and strengthen their ability to participate successfully.

2) Student Recruitment and Support (25 points)
A) The proposal provides evidence that the intended outreach and recruitment strategies respond to the needs of low-income students in the communities to be served.
B) The proposal presents a combination of supportive elements that will strengthen low-income students' preparation for AP coursework, assist them in successful completion of the courses chosen, and enhance their likelihood of success on the culminating exams.

3) Need (15 points)
A) The proposal describes the status of the applicant's instructional programs and demonstrates that students' access to rigorous academic coursework is limited by the scarcity of appropriately trained instructional staff or other necessary resources and materials.
B) The proposal demonstrates that other sources of funding are limited to such an extent that the applicant is unable to conduct or expand the program as proposed without grant funding.

4) Cost-Effectiveness and Sustainability (15 points)
A) The scope of the proposed activities is reasonable in light of the amount of funding to be provided, and the project will be cost-effective considering the number and types of courses to be supported and the number of students to be served.
B) The proposal gives evidence of the district's commitment to continuing efforts to foster greater participation in AP coursework by low-income students and to support them in achieving greater success and achievement in that coursework.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Effective with the 2016-2017 academic year, scores of ≥ 3 on AP exams must be accepted for credit to satisfy degree requirements by all public institutions of higher education. Each institution of higher education must determine for each test whether credit will be granted for electives, general education requirements, or major requirements and the AP scores required to grant credit for those purposes.

By the conclusion of the 2019-2020 academic year, the Board of Higher Education, in cooperation with the Illinois Community College Board, must analyze each institution's AP exam score course granting policy and the research used by each institution in determining the level of credit and the number of credits provided for AP scores and file a report to the general assembly and the governor that includes findings and recommendations. Each institution of higher education must provide the Board of Higher Education and the Illinois Community College Board with all necessary data, in accordance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, to conduct the analysis.

Each institution of higher education must publish its updated AP exam score course granting policy on its website before the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Indiana
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Each high school must provide at least two AP and two dual credit course offerings.

In addition, each school corporation must provide AP science and math courses to qualified students.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Money appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program may be used to:
  • Pay school corporations for instructional materials needed for a math or science advanced course
  • Pay for or rent equipment that a school corporation may need to develop a math or science advanced course
  • Pay costs incurred in implementing the AP program for the subjects other than math and science.
The department must establish guidelines for the distribution of these funds, including guidelines to ensure that money is distributed as evenly as possible throughout Indiana. In establishing these distribution guidelines, the department must consider the following factors:
  • The number of students and teachers participating in the program
  • Even geographic representation
  • Financial need of students participating in the program
  • Any other factor affecting the distribution of funds.
The department may give priority in the distribution of funds to a school that serves a high concentration of low income students.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: A school's college and career readiness achievement score is the product of the college and career readiness achievement rate and the state college and career readiness factor. A school's college and career readiness achievement rate is based on the percentage of students in the school's 4-year graduation cohort who accomplished any of the following:
  • Passed an AP exam with a score of 3, 4, or 5
  • Passed an IB exam with a score of 4, 5, 6, or 7
  • Earned 3 college credits via a dual credit/dual enrollment course
  • Obtained an industry-recognized credential
Reporting: Each school corporation's annual performance report must include the percentage of students taking an AP exam, and percentage scoring 3, 4, and 5 on the exam. 

In addition, the department of education must prepare an annual report on the implementation of the AP program. The report must include the pertinent details of the program, including:
  • The number of students participating in the program.
  • The number of teachers attending a summer institute offered by the College Board.
  • Recent trends in the field of advanced placement.
  • The distribution of money under this program.
  • Gender and minority participation.
  • Other pertinent matters.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Money appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program may be used to pay stipends for teachers assigned to teach a math or science advanced course to attend College Board summer training institutes.

For a teacher to be eligible for a stipend, the training must:
  • Provide AP and pre-AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced courses
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that enables them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools
  • Provide middle school, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP success
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
An annual report by the department of education to the state board on AP program implementation must include the number of teachers attending a summer institute offered by the College Board.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. The Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) covers the full exam fee for English, math, and science AP exams taken by 11th and 12th grade Indiana students enrolled in the corresponding course offered by accredited public and nonpublic schools. These exams include: Biology; Calculus AB; Calculus BC; Chemistry; Environmental Science; Computer Science A; Physics 1; Physics 2; Physics C, Electricity & Magnetism); Physics C, Mechanics; Statistics; English Language and Composition; and English Literature and Composition.

In addition, AP exam fees are not to be charged low-income students. According to a department memo, the federal 2015 AP Test Fee Grant will be utilized to cover most of this cost for non-math or-science AP exams taken by eligible students, and state funds will be used to cover the remainder.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The state board may approve AP courses offered by a state educational institution in collaboration with a school corporation if the institution and school corporation demonstrate to the state board that the particular AP course satisfies the objectives of AP statutes.

In addition, statute directs the department of education and the commission for higher education to work with each state educational institution on implementing and communicating the state educational institution's policy for awarding AP credits for minimum scores.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Stipends are available for pre-AP teachers to participate in College Board summer training institutes. For a teacher to be eligible for a stipend, the training must: 
  • Provide pre-AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced courses.
  • Provide middle school, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP success.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
The department of education must develop and provide each public middle, junior high, and high school with AP curriculum guidelines. The guidelines must include a plan for increasing the (1) availability of AP programs in schools with a high concentration of low-income students; and (2) participation of low-income students in AP programsthrough information dissemination through print, electronic, and broadcast media that informs parents and students of the importance of AP and pre-AP courses to a student's ability to gain access to and to succeed in postsecondary education.

In addition, the department of education must establish guidelines for the distribution of certain funds to pay AP math and science exam fees, teacher training, instructional material and other course start-up costs, including guidelines to ensure that money is distributed as evenly as possible throughout Indiana. In establishing these distribution guidelines, the department must consider the following factors:
  • The number of students and teachers participating in the program
  • Even geographic representation
  • Financial need of students participating in the program
  • Any other factor affecting the distribution of funds.
The department may give priority in the distribution of funds to a school that serves a high concentration of low-income students.

A school corporation may provide a supplemental payment to a teacher in excess of the salary specified in the school corporation's compensation plan if the teacher teaches an AP course.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. All public postsecondary institutions must award credit for scores of ≥ 3. However, an institution may require a score higher than 3 on an AP exam if the credit is to be used for meeting a course requirement for a particular major at the institution.

In addition, statute directs the department of education and the commission for higher education to work with each state educational institution on implementing and communicating the state educational institution's policy for awarding AP credits for minimum scores.
Unique characteristics A student who earns a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam is entitled to receive a certificate of achievement.

Before the end of grade 9, each student must further develop the graduation plan developed in grade 6. The updated graduation plan must indicate assessments (other than ISTEP and the graduation examination) that the student plans to take voluntarily during grades 10-12, including any AP exams.

Iowa
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Districts must make AP courses available to their resident students through direct instruction on-site, collaboration with another school district, or via the online Iowa AP Academy.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. One of the functions of the Iowa online Advanced Placement academy science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) initiative is to provide AP teacher training opportunities.

In addition, an AP summer program is established at the University of Iowa for training AP instructors. The University of Iowa is responsible for the development of appropriate curricula, course offerings, provision of qualified instructors, and the selection of program participants. If funds are appropriated for the program, those funds must be used to pay for the cost of providing instructors, counselors, room and board for teachers attending the program, materials. If appropriated funds are insufficient to meet program participation demands, the university must give priority to the needs of teachers from schools that do not have AP programs.

Districts must ensure that AP course teachers are appropriately licensed by the board of educational examiners and meet the College Board's minimum certification requirements.
State subsidies for testing fees No. While statute provides for a fee remittance for AP exams, funds have not been appropriated for this purpose. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Senior Year Plus is an umbrella program created in 2008 that includes AP classes, including on-site, consortium, and online opportunities and courses delivered via the Iowa communications network.

The Iowa Online AP Academy offers AP courses. In addition, the Iowa online Advanced Placement academy science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) initiative is established within the International Center for Talented and Gifted Education at the University of Iowa to deliver, with an emphasis on STEM coursework, pre-AP and AP courses to high school students statewide, and provide preparation for middle school students to ensure success in high school.

Further, districts must provide descriptions of the AP courses available to students using a course registration handbook. Districts must establish prerequisite coursework for each AP course offered and describe the prerequisites in the course registration handbook, which must be provided to every junior high school or middle school student prior to the development of a core curriculum plan.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The Iowa online Advanced Placement academy science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) initiative is established within the International Center for Talented and Gifted Education at the University of Iowa to deliver, with an emphasis on STEM coursework, pre-AP and AP courses to high school students throughout the state, provide training opportunities for teachers to learn how to teach AP courses in Iowa's high schools, and provide preparation for middle school students to ensure success in high school.

A school district and accredited nonpublic school must ensure that any student enrolled interested in taking an AP exam is properly registered for the exam. An accredited nonpublic school must provide a list of students registered for AP exams to the district in which the accredited nonpublic school is located. The district and the accredited nonpublic school must also ensure that any student enrolled in the district or nonpublic school who is interested in taking an AP exam and qualifies for a reduced exam fee is properly registered for the fee reduction. The school district must provide the College Board with a list of all students enrolled in the district and the accredited nonpublic schools located in the district who are properly registered for AP exams.

Districts must make AP coursework available to a dually enrolled student under competent private instruction if the student meets the same criteria as a regularly enrolled student of the district, and to a student enrolled in an accredited nonpublic school in the district if the student meets specified criteria.

Kansas
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Kentucky
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all high schools must offer AP, IB, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Statute defines “advanced science and mathematics” to mean AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics, and IB biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental systems, mathematical studies, further mathematics, and physics. The department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program. The program is to increase the number of students who successfully complete rigorous science and math coursework during high school by providing support to high schools to offer additional advanced science and math courses with highly trained teachers and appropriate course materials.

The program provides 2-year grants to high schools. To qualify for a grant, a school must initiate at least 1 advanced math and science course. During the first year of the grant, funds must be used for planning and the training of teachers. During the second year of the grant, funds must be used to provide additional support for implementation of an advanced science and math course. Permissible uses of funds include additional training for an advanced science and math teacher and the purchase of classroom supplies, textbooks, laboratory equipment, and other instructional materials.

A high school applying for a grant must provide assurances that:
  • All teachers of AP advanced science and mathematics courses supported by the grant will participate in a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, as available; and
  • All students completing AP courses supported by the grant will take the related AP exam.
Further, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The program must provide 2-year renewable grants to middle schools to support intensive, accelerated student learning in math and the sciences, to be offered at no cost to participants. Grants must be used to support activities that may include but not be limited to programs during the school day, after-school programs, Saturday programs, or multiweek summer sessions.

The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development. A recipient middle school must collaborate with its feeder elementary schools, and with high schools to which it sends students, to:
  • Share information on grant activities
  • Strengthen alignment of curricula, content-knowledge expectations, and instructional practice between schools
  • Provide relevant professional development opportunities.
The accelerated learning program must include strategies to improve the academic skills in math and science for all students for whom significant academic achievement gaps have been identified and to attract them into higher level math and science courses. Specific activities must be conducted to recruit and enroll students from all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups in the school. Each grant applicant must provide assurances that the necessary resources will be allocated and utilized to help students in all subpopulations academically succeed in the accelerated learning program and to meet the enrollment goal (specifically, that the number of students representing each racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group enrolled in the mathematics and science accelerated learning program is not less than nor limited to the percentage of each group in the total school population).

Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to: 
  • Identify, in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward AP instruction
  • Compare the costs of offering AP courses through traditional on-site instruction, the Kentucky Virtual High School, and other methods and offer each school district assistance, if requested, in analyzing how the school district can most cost-effectively offer the largest number of AP courses
  • Identify current and future funding sources for AP programs and the amount of funds available or anticipated from those sources.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School report cards must report, disaggregated by race, gender, disability and economic status:
  • AP courses offered
  • The number of students enrolled, completing, and taking the exam for each course
  • The percentage of examinees receiving a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exam.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Upon receipt of adequate federal funding, the department of education must:
  • Expand AP teacher training institutes, including offering AP teacher training instruction and assistance through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education through the Kentucky Virtual University
  • Require teachers who are planning to participate in AP teacher training and complete AP training at AP institutes facilitated by the department to sign an agreement to teach at least 1 AP course in a Kentucky public school or the Kentucky Virtual High School when assigned by the school principal.
Regulation requires all high schools to establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses. The policy must provide for the assignment to AP courses teachers certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the AP course.

In addition, statute defines “advanced science and mathematics” to mean AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics, and IB biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental systems, mathematical studies, further mathematics, and physics. The department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program. 

The program is to increase the number of students who successfully complete rigorous science and math coursework during high school by providing support to high schools to offer additional advanced science and math courses with highly trained teachers and appropriate course materials.

The program provides 2-year grants to high schools. During the first year of the grant, funds must be used for planning and the training of teachers. Additional permissible uses of funds include additional training for an advanced science and math teacher. A high school applying for a grant must provide assurances that all teachers of AP advanced science and mathematics courses supported by the grant will participate in a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, as available.

Further, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development.

Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual statewide goals concerning STEM disciplines and AP/IB course participation, including the number of teachers successfully completing a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, and the number of teachers with the knowledge and training needed to prepare students for high achievement on AP exams in advanced science and math (defined in statute as AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics).
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. One of the purposes of the science and mathematics advancement fund is to pay public school students' fees for AP exams in math and science.

However, for free and reduced-price lunch students not covered by the science and mathematics advancement fund, the student's school and/or district pays the $15 not covered by federal and College Board grants and school waiver of school exam rebate. Students should not pay the $15 fee.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes, for supplement to the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES). The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) is directed to provide a supplemental award for achievement on AP exams for an eligible high school student whose family was eligible for free or reduced-price lunch for any year during high school enrollment. The supplemental award for AP exam scores are:
  • $200 for each score of 3
  • $250 for each score of 4
  • $300 for each score of 5.
In addition, high schools are required to annually report to KHEEA by June 30 a compiled list of all high school students during the academic year, including family eligibility status for free or reduced-price lunch, and each AP exam score. Based on these and other reported data, KHEEA must notify each 12th grader of his/her final Kentucky educational excellence scholarship and supplemental award, including based on AP exam scores.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to:
  • Offer AP teacher training either through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education through the Kentucky Virtual University
  • Identify, in conjunction with the council on postsecondary education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward AP.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Kentucky Department of Education must make information available to middle and high schools on the prerequisite content necessary for success in AP courses. The department must provide sample syllabi, instructional resources, and instructional supports for teachers that will assist in preparing students for more rigorous coursework. Instructional supports must include professional development for assisting students enrolled in the Kentucky Virtual High School or other virtual learning settings.

Each secondary school-based decision making council must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses that recognizes that all students have the right to participate in a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to AP courses, including AP courses offered through the Kentucky Virtual High School, if they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards. If a school does not offer an AP course in a particular subject area, the school must permit a qualified student to enroll in the AP course offered by the Kentucky Virtual High School.

In addition, each high school school-based decision making council, or the principal if none exists, must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses. The policy must:
  • Provide equitable access for AP course participation for all students using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction, including the Kentucky Virtual High School
  • Provide for sharing information with all students through the individual graduation plan process and other means regarding the benefits of taking AP courses and AP exams including the potential for earning college credit
  • Establish an equitable process for recruiting underrepresented students in AP courses, including:
    • Racial minorities
    • Students with limited English proficiency
    • Students who qualify for free and reduced lunch
    • Students with disabilities
    • Males or females
  • Provide for the assignment to AP courses teachers certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the AP course.
A student whose scores on the grade 10 college readiness exam or grade 11 college admissions exam indicate a high degree of readiness for college must be counseled to enroll in accelerated courses (including but not limited to AP courses).

The science and mathematics advancement fund is established to provide incentives for public schools to provide or expand student access to rigorous science and mathematics curricula, including AP courses in biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics. Funds may be used for teacher training, course materials, and scholarships for high school students to take advanced science and mathematics courses through the Kentucky Virtual High School when those courses are not offered at the school in which they are enrolled, among other purposes.

In addition, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The program must provide 2-year renewable grants to middle schools to support intensive, accelerated student learning in math and the sciences, to be offered at no cost to participants. Grants must be used to support activities that may include but not be limited to programs during the school day, after-school programs, Saturday programs, or multiweek summer sessions.

The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development. A recipient middle school must collaborate with its feeder elementary schools, and with high schools to which it sends students, to:
  • Share information on grant activities
  • Strengthen alignment of curricula, content-knowledge expectations, and instructional practice between schools
  • Provide relevant professional development opportunities.
The accelerated learning program must include strategies to improve the academic skills in math and science for all students for whom significant academic achievement gaps have been identified and to attract them into higher level math and science courses. Specific activities must be conducted to recruit and enroll students from all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups in the school. Each grant applicant must provide assurances that the necessary resources will be allocated and utilized to help students in all subpopulations academically succeed in the accelerated learning program and to meet the enrollment goal (specifically, that the number of students representing each racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group enrolled in the mathematics and science accelerated learning program is not less than nor limited to the percentage of each group in the total school population).

Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual goals related to STEM and advanced coursetaking in math and science, including, among others: 
  • The number of high schools providing rigorous curricula and making available accelerated classes and college credit for students
  • The number and percentage of students enrolled in and completing AP courses by content area
  • The number and percentage of students whose families are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch receiving a score of ≥ 3 on AP exams
Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to develop the Kentucky Virtual Advanced Placement Academy which must offer school districts and their students access to a core AP curriculum through the Kentucky Virtual High School.

The Barren Academy of Virtual and Expanded Learning (BAVEL), a public school recognized by the Kentucky Department of Education, offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Public postsecondary institutions must grant academic credit for scores of ≥ 3 on AP exams. Institution-level policies must specify whether the institution will grant academic credit toward the requirements of a major, program, or degree. Policies must also state which AP exams will be accepted toward academic credit toward a major, program or degree, and the minimum score on the AP exam for granting the academic credit toward a major, program or degree.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, a high school applying for a grant under the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program, which supports costs associated with planning, teacher training and materials costs to expand AP course access in math and science, must provide assurances that all students completing AP courses supported by the grant will take the AP exam related to the course.
Unique characteristics Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual statewide goals concerning STEM disciplines and AP/IB course participation, including:
  • The number of high schools providing rigorous curricula and making available accelerated classes and college credit for students
  • The number and percentage of students enrolled in and completing AP courses by content area
  • The number and percentage of students taking the AP exams in advanced science and math (defined in statute as biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics)
  • The number and percentage of students receiving a score of ≥ 3 on the AP exams in advanced science and math
  • The number and percentage of students whose families are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch receiving a score of ≥ 3 on AP exams
  • The number of teachers successfully completing a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute
  • The number of teachers with the knowledge and training needed to prepare students for high achievement on AP exams in advanced science and math
  • Other criteria determined by the board.

Louisiana
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Each high school must offer at least one AP course in each of 4 content areas, plus one additional AP course.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. One of the authorized uses of Louisiana Quality Education Support Funds is the purchase of textbooks for AP courses. Whenever purchases using fund dollars are for the use of a specific population within a school, such as AP students, the project must name the specific population and must illustrate the reasons for selecting the specific population to receive support fund monies.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. The graduation index of a school is the average number of points earned by cohort members. A graduating member of a high school cohort who earns a high school diploma:
  • Earns a ≥ 3 on an AP exam earns 150 points
  • Passes an AP course, takes the AP exam, but does not score  ≥ 3, earns 110 points
in the calculation of the graduation index for his/her school. A 5-year graduate (any diploma type) and earn a ≥ 3 on an AP exam generate 140 points. To ensure the accuracy of data used to calculate the graduation index, the calculation lags one year behind the collection of the data (data for the Class of 2016 will be used for 2017 accountability calculations).

In addition, the department of education's standardized data collection and analysis system may, but is not required to regularly collect, the number of students in AP classes.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state department of education will provide up to $700 per teacher to attend a College Board authorized 2016 AP Summer Institute, with priority given to teachers of STEM and recently redesigned AP courses. For 2016, the department anticipates reimbursing approximately 180 teachers for attending an AP Summer Institute.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $0 in spring 2016 after $12 state [pending availability of funds] as well as federal and College Board grants are applied, for up to three AP exams per low-income students.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state board of elementary and secondary education must develop or identify specific methods of targeted intervention for the public school systems that have 4-year cohort graduation rates below 80%. Intervention methods may include increased availability of AP courses.

In addition, the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts (LSMSA) Virtual School offers stand-alone AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Under the statewide articulation and transfer agreeement, postsecondary educational institutions must accept credits earned in accelerated programs such as AP.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Maine
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, secondary schools must offer opportunities for learning in multiple pathways, which may include Advanced Placement.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Teachers teaching AP4ALL online AP courses receive training in their AP content area as well as in the pedagogy of effective online instruction. Teachers receive substantial support with regards to integrating technology, effective online communication, and all components of teaching and learning in an online environment.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. AP4ALL, supported by the Maine Department of Education, provides online AP courses at no cost to any student residing in a Maine school administrative unit who is educated at the public expense.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Maryland
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting.

Reporting: Accountability reports for districts and schools include participation in AP, SAT, ACT, and PSAT exams. AP data include, for all AP subject and disaggregated for English, math, science and social studies:
  • Student count in AP course
  • Student count in AP exam
  • AP exams per student
  • Mean grade per exam
  • # of exams with students scoring 3-5
  • % of exams with students scoring 3-5.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016, after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities offers a number of AP courses. Course costs vary by course and by whether Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunities or the local district provides a qualified teacher. Districts may offer scholarships or local funding to cover a student's course costs.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. However, credit for transfer students' AP exam scores must be assigned according to the same standards that apply to native students in the receiving institution.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics One of the duties of the Maryland Advisory Council for Virtual Learning is to make recommendations for expanded curriculum for AP courses.

Massachusetts
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Subject to appropriation, the state board must establish a program to award districts grants for the costs associated with establishing AP courses. The board must promulgate regulations defining the standards of eligibility and other implementation guidelines.

2015 H.B. 3650 makes a $2.7 million appropriation for 2015-2016 for a competitively bid, statewide performance based, integrated program to increase participation and performance in AP courses, particularly among underserved populations, to prepare students for college and career success in STEM and English. These funds must support a number of program elements, including equipment and supplies for new and expanded AP courses.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. 2015 H.B. 3650 makes a $2.7 million appropriation for 2015-2016 for a competitively bid, statewide performance based, integrated program to increase participation and performance in AP courses, particularly among underserved populations, to prepare students for college and career success in STEM and English. These funds must support a number of program elements, and may support teacher professional development, including a College Board-endorsed AP summer institute for math, science, and English teachers. The program must provide a minimum $1,000,000 match of private funds for direct support of educators and other uses.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Subject to appropriation, the board of elementary and secondary education must establish an AP test fee grant program to award districts grants for the reimbursement of exam fees based on financial need. The board must promulgate regulations defining the standards of eligibility and other implementation guidelines for this program.

2015 H.B. 3650 makes a $2.7 million appropriation for 2015-2016 for a competitively bid, statewide performance based, integrated program to increase participation and performance in AP courses, particularly among underserved populations, to prepare students for college and career success in STEM and English. These funds must support a number of program elements, including support for the costs of AP exams.

Low-income students who are not supported by the programs identified above will pay $15 in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes. A candidate for the Certificate of Mastery with Distinction must attain minimum scores on one of the following sets of assessments:
(a) Two SAT II exams
(b) Two AP exams
(c) One SAT II exam and one AP exam
(d) One SAT II exam and one Other Achievement
(e) One AP exam and one Other Achievement.

Students must earn at least a 3 on an AP exam or a score on an SAT II exam determined by the Department to be comparable to a score of three on an AP exam where SAT II and AP exams exist in the same subject area. Students earning a Certificate of Mastery with Distinction receive a tuition waiver to state postsecondary institutions for up to 8 semesters, provided students maintain a minimum 3.3 GPA.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. 2015 H.B. 3650 makes a $2.7 million appropriation for 2015-2016 for a competitively bid, statewide performance based, integrated program to increase participation and performance in AP courses, particularly among underserved populations, to prepare students for college and career success in STEM and English. These funds must support all of the following program elements for each school: 
  • Open access to courses
  • Equipment and supplies for new and expanded AP courses
  • Support for the costs of AP exams
  • Support for student study sessions.
These funds may also support teacher professional development, including a College Board-endorsed AP summer institute for math, science, and English AP teachers. The program must provide a minimum $1,000,000 match in private funds for direct support of educators and other uses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Michigan
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for annual accreditation report. If a district board wants all of its schools to be accredited, the board must prepare and submit to the state board an annual education report that includes, among other indicators: 
  • The number of college level equivalent courses offered to students in the school, in the district, and in consortia or cooperative programs available to school district students
  • The number and percentage of student in the school enrolled in at least 1 college level equivalent course during the immediately preceding school year, disaggregated by grade level
  • The number and percentage of students enrolled in a college level equivalent course who took a college level equivalent credit exam
  • The number and percentage of students achieving a score on a college level equivalent credit exam that is at or above the level recommended by the testing service for college credit.
The accreditation report must also include a comparison of these data with data from the immediately preceding school year.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $5 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Michigan Virtual School offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics A provision that requires school districts to begin the school year after Labor Day provides that these provisions do not apply to a public school that operates all of grades 6-12 at a single site, aligns its high school curriculum with AP courses as the capstone of the curriculum, and ends its second academic semester concurrently with the end of the AP exam period.

Minnesota
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. Program funds may be used to purchase books and supplies, among other purposes.

In addition, any group of districts or a consolidated district that meets specified criteria may apply for an incentive grant for construction of a new facility or for remodeling and improving an existing facility. For an applicant group of districts, an education program must be developed that provides for more learning opportunities and course offerings, including the offering of AP courses, for students than is currently available in any single member district.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. Accountability reports must include a rigorous coursework measure indicating the number and percentage of high school graduates in the most recent school year who successfully completed one or more AP courses.

In addition, the commissioner must annually submit the following information on rigorous course taking, disaggregated by student subgroup, school district, and postsecondary institution, to the education committees of the legislature:
  • The number of pupils enrolled in AP courses in each school district
  • The number of teachers in each district attending College Board training programs 
  • The number of teachers in each district participating in support programs
  • Recent trends in the field of AP programs
  • Expenditures related to AP courses and programs
  • Other recommendations for AP programs in the state.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. Program funds may be used to provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who participate in pre-AP or AP courses.

The state may pay a portion of the tuition, room, board, and out-of-state travel costs a teacher or other interested educator incurs in participating in an AP training program. The commissioner of education must determine application procedures and deadlines, select teachers and other interested educators to participate in the training program, and determine the payment process and amount of the subsidy. The procedures determined by the commissioner must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in districts. 

In practice, a 2015 legislative appropriation allows applicant Minnesota teachers attending a summer 2016 in-state training at Carleton College and/or Augsburg College to receive a scholarship of $500 for tuition and college credit, and an additional $150 for room and board on campus. Teachers may apply for an out-of-state AP training scholarship of up to $900 if the AP course the teacher needs is not available at Carleton or Augsburg, the 2016 training dates pose a conflict, or the teacher attended Augsburg or Carleton training in 2015.

In addition, the commissioner must provide support programs during the school year for teachers who attended the training programs and experienced AP teachers. The support programs must provide teachers with opportunities to share instructional ideas with other teachers. The state may pay the costs of participating in the support programs, including substitute teachers, if necessary, and program affiliation costs.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. By statute, the state must pay exam fees for low-income public and non-public school students, and to the extent of the appropriation, pay a portion or all of the exam fees for other public and nonpublic students. Low-income students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $0 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied. After a $40 Minnesota Department of Education reimbursement, non-low-income students will pay $43 or $52 in spring 2016, depending on whether their school waives the $9 school rebate.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. To be eligible to participate, a 3-year plan approved by the local school board must seeks to achieve one or more of the following goals:
  • Increase the availability of and all students' access to AP courses
  • Expand the breadth of AP courses available to students
  • Increase the number and the diversity of students participating and succeeding in AP courses
  • Provide low-income and other disadvantaged students with increased access to AP courses
  • Increase the number of high school students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who receive college credit by successfully completing AP courses and achieving satisfactory scores on related exams.
In reviewing applications, priority may be given an otherwise qualified applicant that demonstrates any of the following:
  • A focus on developing or expanding pre-AP or AP courses or increasing students' participation in, access to, or success with these courses, including the participation, access, or success of low-income and other disadvantaged students
  • A compelling need for access to pre-AP or AP courses
  • An effective ability to actively involve local business and community organizations in student activities integral to pre-AP and AP courses
  • Access to additional public or nonpublic funds or in-kind contributions available for pre-AP or AP courses
  • An intent to implement activities that target low-income and other disadvantaged students.
The commissioner must award grants on an equitable geographical basis to the extent feasible. Grant awards must not exceed the lesser of $85 times the number of pupils enrolled at the participating sites on October 1 of the previous fiscal year, or the approved supplemental expenditures based on the budget submitted in the district or charter school's proposal. 

Program funding must be used, consistent with the application for any of the following purposes:
  • Provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who participate in pre-AP or AP courses
  • Further develop pre-AP or AP courses
  • Improve the transition between grade levels to better prepare students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, for succeeding in pre-AP or AP courses
  • Purchase books and supplies
  • Pay course fees
  • Increase students' participation in and success with pre-AP or AP courses or programs
  • Expand students' access to pre-AP or AP courses through online learning
  • Hire appropriately licensed personnel to teach additional AP courses
  • Engage in other activity directly related to expanding students' access to, participation in, and success with pre-AP or AP courses, including low-income and other disadvantaged students.
Each recipient district or charter school must:
  • Collect demographic and other student data to measure the extent to which the district or charter school raised students' academic achievement. These data must be reported to the commissioner, who must annually make summary data about this program available to the education policy and finance committees of the legislature.
  • Annually report to the commissioner its actual expenditures for AP and pre-AP courses. The report must demonstrate that the district or charter school has maintained its effort from other sources for AP and pre-AP courses compared with the previous fiscal year, and the district or charter school has expended all grant funds, consistent with its approved budget.
In addition, procedures for disbursing AP teacher training funds overseen by the commissioner must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in school districts.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. Minnesota State Colleges and Universities must award credit for an AP exam score of ≥ 3. The University of Minnesota is encouraged to but not required to award college credit for AP scores of ≥ 3.

2015 H.F. 1 directed the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to  submit to the K–12 and higher education legislative committees a report by February 1, 2016 describing how to standardize AP exam course equivalencies across all state colleges and universities.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Mississippi
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. All districts must offer at least one AP course in English, math, science and social studies. Distance learning or the Mississippi Virtual Public School may be used as an appropriate alternative for the delivery of AP courses.. Any public high school offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is exempt from the requirement to offer AP courses.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: Beginning in the 2015-16 school year, high schools will have an Acceleration component in their calculations. The Acceleration component refers to the percentage of students taking and passing the assessment associated with the accelerated courses such as AP, IB, Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE), or state board-approved industry certification courses. For AP courses, the student must score  3 on the AP exam.

The Acceleration component will consist of a Participation and a Performance component. These 2 components will be combined for one score worth 50 points and phased in on the following sliding scale:
  • Year 1 (2015-2016): (Participation-70%/Performance-30%) ÷ 2
  • Year 2 (2016-2017): (Participation-60%/Performance-40%) ÷ 2
  • Year 3 (2017-2018) and beyond: (Participation-50%/Performance-50%) ÷ 2
Students participating in multiple accelerated courses during the same school year will be given additional weighting in the numerator:
• 2 courses: 1.1
• 3 courses: 1.2
• 4 courses: 1.3
• 5 courses: 1.4

Reporting: Under the Children First Act, districts must report the number of students enrolled in AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Each teacher planning to teach an AP course must have completed the College Board endorsed AP Summer Institute (APSI) for the course and must have obtained the AP certification through the Mississippi Department of Education's Office of Educator Licensure. Documentation showing completion of the College Board APSI is required. Teachers with the AP certification must comply with licensure renewal guidelines. AP teachers must complete the AP Summer Institute (APSI) at least every 5 years, which can be used for licensure renewal if completed during the validity period. An exception is provided to teachers who have served with Educational Testing Service as readers for the AP exam(s). Such teachers may have the initial training waived and automatically earn the AP certification if the appropriate documentation is provided. These teachers should complete the APSI at least every 5 years or serve as a reader for the AP exam(s) at least every 5 years.

AP endorsements are added by completion of College Board approved AP training. Endorsements can only be added as a supplemental endorsement to a standard 5-year license. This endorsement must be renewed every 5 years with additional AP training, and cannot be renewed with CEUs or coursework.

In addition, proposals to offer a pre-AP course must be submitted to the department of education before the course may be offered. The proposal must indicate the College Board training the Pre-AP teachers will obtain in order to teach the Pre-AP courses.  Each teacher planning to teach a Pre-AP course must have completed the College Board's Pre-AP Summer Institute, Vertical Teams Training, the Pre-AP Workshop, or other training specifically designed for Pre-AP teachers. The district is responsible for providing documentation (when requested) of participation in the Pre-AP training.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Districts must offer pre-AP courses to prepare students for AP coursework. A district must submit a Pre-Advanced Placement Program Proposal to the department of education's Office of Curriculum and Instruction. The proposal must indicate the Pre-AP courses that will be offered and the College Board training that the Pre-AP teachers will obtain in order to teach the courses. The proposal must also indicate the process for identifying students for Pre-AP courses. Each teacher planning to teach a Pre-AP course must have completed the College Board's Pre-AP Summer Institute, Vertical Teams Training, the Pre-AP Workshop, or other training specifically designed for Pre-AP teachers. The district is responsible for providing documentation (when requested) of participation in the Pre-AP training. The Pre-AP Program Proposal will be approved for a 5-year period. Whenever a district makes changes to the Pre-AP Program, the district must submit a new Pre-AP Program Proposal Form to the department of education for approval prior to implementing changes.

The Mississippi Virtual Public School (MVPS), administered by the Mississippi Department of Education, offers AP courses. However, according to the department of education website, a student is limited to 2 Carnegie units per school year.  Participation in this program is determined by each district.

2016 S.B. 2064 establishes the “Distance Learning Collaborative Act of 2016.” Under the act, the department of education must establish a voluntary distance learning grant program that is a collaboration among the entities providing distance learning services. The Distance Learning Collaborative Program must provide financial assistance to encourage and improve distance learning education services in rural areas through the use of telecommunications, computer networks and related advanced technologies to be used by students, teachers and rural residents. Distance Learning Collaborative Program courses must be fully eligible for dual credit. AP is a form of dual credit in Mississippi. 

Regulation provides that, subject to appropriation, funding must be made available so that all public school 10th graders may take an exam [Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) or ACT PLAN Assessment] that measures the students' ability to succeed in an AP course. The examination results should be used to identify students who were not recognized during middle school as students who would benefit from taking AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, because pass rates are an accountability metric for high schools beginning in the 2015-16 academic year, schools are encouraging students in AP courses to take the AP exam.
Unique characteristics Parents may use funds deposited in a participating student's Educational Savings Account (ESA) for any of a number of qualifying expenses to educate the student, including AP exam fees.

The Joint Legislative Committee on Performance Evaluation and Expenditure Review (PEER) must prepare a biannual report, beginning in 2018 and every 2 years thereafter, assessing the sufficiency of funding for Education Scholarship Accounts and recommending any suggested changes in state law or policy necessary to improve the program. One of the elements the report must assess is student performance on AP exams.

Missouri
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Subject to appropriation, a student may earn a one-time $500 Advanced Placement Incentive Grant for earning two scores of 3 or higher on an AP exam in math or science while enrolled in a Missouri public high school. To be eligible, an applicant student must additionally receive an award under the Access Missouri Financial Assistance Program or the A+ Schools Program.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. The department of elementary and secondary education must have a scoring rubric for AP courses as part of the Missouri school improvement program (MSIP). Specifically, there are 5 areas of performance standards for K-12 districts, including college and career readiness. One of the 6 metrics demonstrating the district provides adequate postsecondary preparation for all students is the percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score or grade on an AP, IB, or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessment and/or receive college credit or a qualifying grade through early college, dual enrollment, or approved dual credit courses meets or exceeds the state standard or demonstrates required improvement.

The rubric, which must recognize the difficulty of providing such courses in rural districts, must take into account population density in districts and localized teacher shortages in academic specializations, and differentially reward districts for accomplishing delivery of such courses through electronic media under such circumstances.

Regulation governing the Missouri school improvement program establishes metrics for college and career readiness, including the percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on an AP exam meets or exceeds the state standard or demonstrates required improvement.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. While regulation establishes the Missouri Fee Payment Program to defray AP test fees of students not eligible for federal or College Board fee reductions, the legislature has not made any appropriations in the recent past to support the program.

Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Missouri Virtual Instruction Program (MoVIP) offers AP courses.

In addition, the 2016 General Assembly has appropriated $100,000 that the department may use to provide grants to districts with high schools that are expanding their AP programs, to include students who typically don't participate.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. However, the state credit transfer guidelines requires that institutions transfer and treat credit earned via AP in the same manner as it would for native students.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics When a foster care student transfers before or during the school year, the receiving school must initially honor placement of the student in educational courses based on the student's enrollment in the sending school or educational assessments conducted at the sending school if the courses are offered. For these purposes, course placement includes AP courses.

Innovation campuses are partnerships that include at least one high school or K-12 school district, four-year public or private postsecondary institution, Missouri-based business, and year public higher education institution or State Technical College of Missouri. Priority for innovation campus funds will be given to requests that focus on several priorities, including reduction or elimination of student costs of college credit coursework completed before matriculation, including via AP.

Montana
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No. However, statute directs the superintendent of public instruction to gather, maintain, and distribute longitudinal, actionable data on student-level AP exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $16 in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute governing the Montana Educational Telecommunications Network directs the superintendent of public instruction to coordinate with the commissioner of higher education and the units of the Montana university system to offer AP courses.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. One of the stated objectives of the Montana Educational Telecommunications Network is to offer AP courses.

The Montana Digital Academy offers AP courses, as well as one-semester AP-prep "Stepping Stones to AP" courses in English, biology and psychology.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Nebraska
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $53 for all but AP Research and AP Seminar exams in spring 2016, after College Board grants are applied. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $100 for each AP Research and AP Seminar Exam in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Regulation calls for school systems to gather and maintain aggregate data measuring the academic progress of all identified high ability learners, including the number of identified high ability learners participating in AP classes.

Nevada
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. Applicants must use these funds for one or more of specified activities, including:
  • Development of adequate programming infrastructure (hardware, software) to improve student access to virtual learning.
  • Funding for additional books and materials for AP course work.
  • Developing a rigorous curriculum.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. Nevada's "College and Career Readiness" indicator ranks high schools on a scale from 0 to 4 points based on several indicators, including the percent of students passing AP courses. 
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. $200,000 of the $662,750 in funds available for the 2016-17 school year must be used to provide professional development for AP teachers. Grantees' budgets should include costs associated with College Board-sponsored trainings. Grantees will use this portion of the fund for one or more of the following:
  • In collaboration with the College Board, an AP summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time and experienced teachers in districts
  • Providing professional development for teachers to conduct and support virtual learning for AP courses.
  • Provide administrators and teachers with resources and a support system that will help them to build capacity for expanding AP courses as well as increase the number of students participating and succeeding in AP courses.
  • Providing staff release time for professional development and addressing the expenses associated with attendance at the College Board conferences.
The RFP also provides that, in collaboration with the College Board, the state will host a two-day rural summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time, and experienced teachers, and teachers in rural districts. The state will also host a statewide Summer Institute training program in June 2017 for all AP teachers. Note that the only grantee expenses related to these activities are those associated with teacher travel.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. $273,750 of these funds are earmarked to pay test fees as well as increase participation for an additional 3,000 students. Funds may be used to pay for test fees for additional students or supplement the federal AP Test Fee program for low-income students.

Independent of these grant funds, students who qualify for a fee reduction under the federal AP test fee program will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Each school district must prepare a written notice of all the AP and other advanced courses available to students in the district. The notice must: 
  • Specify where those courses are available within the school district
  • Identify the grade level of students for which those courses are available
  • Be posted on the district website.
Each public school must:
  • Prepare a written notice that identifies the courses identified by the district notice that are available at that school
  • Post a notice in one or more conspicuous places at the school indicating the availability and location of a complete list of the courses available in the school district and at that school
  • Ensure that the notices are made available to parents of students in the school
    • At the beginning of each school year or upon a pupil's enrollment in the school, including at meetings of parent organizations at the school and by distribution with other information sent home with students
    • At parent-teacher conferences.
2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. Of this appropriation, $662,750 is available for the 2016-17 school year to support the AP component of the grant. Such grant funds are to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. Applicants must use these funds for one or more of the following activities, among others:
  • Funding for online courses to assist students enrolled in AP courses.
  • An outline of the current status of the high school’s AP program, including the number of AP courses offered, as well as a plan to establish or expand these AP programs.
  • A plan for identifying and recruiting students with a high potential for success in AP programs.
  • A proposal that is designed to increase the number of underrepresented students who participate in AP courses and take the respective exams.
  • A plan to create opportunities to increase the number of African American and American Indian students’ participating in AP programs by 100%.
  • A proposal for establishing online and blended instruction in rural areas that experience difficulties accessing qualified AP teachers.
  • Development of the AP program in rural settings to ensure that every rural high school will offer a minimum of three AP courses.
Of this $662,750, $64,000 of these grant funds is earmarked for increasing the number of African American and American Indian students participating in AP courses and exams by 100%.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes, effective with the 2016-2017 academic year. AP scores of ≥ 3 must be accepted for credit to satisfy electives, general education requirements, or major requirements. Each institution must publish its AP exam score course granting policy in its course catalog and on its website before the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Each student's 4-year academic plan developed in grade 9 may include the Advanced Placement courses available to the student that will assist the student in the advancement of his/her education.

One of the means by which a student may demonstrate competency in lieu of seat time is by performance on an Advanced Placement exam in the subject area of the course.

When developing an individualized education program (IEP) for a student with a hearing impairment, the IEP team must consider the provision of academic instruction, school services and direct access to all components of the educational process,including AP courses.

Fees deposited in an education savings account may be used to pay for AP exam fees.

New Hampshire
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, local boards must require that each school has an instructional program that includes a policy encouraging students to pursue and demonstrate advanced course work, including AP and dual enrollment courses.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. Districts must annually report to the department of education the number of graduating students participating in AP programs. Data must be disaggregated as required by federal law. 
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $10 in spring 2016 after $5 state funding per exam, and federal and College Board grants, are applied
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

New Jersey
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, local boards must establish a process to approve post-secondary learning opportunities that may include AP courses, CLEP, or concurrent/dual enrollment.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School and district accountability report cards include :
  • Percent of students completing ≥ 1 AP exam in English, math, science or social studies
  • Percent of AP exam scores ≥ 3 in English, math, science or social studies.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A combination of local, state, federal and College Board subsidies make AP exams available at no cost to low-income students in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

New Mexico
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, at least one of the units required for graduation must be earned as an AP, honors, dual credit, or online course.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. All high schools are graded on college readiness academic indicators that include AP scores. In addition, as part of the annual budget approval process, the department must ensure that a local school board or governing body of a charter school is prioritizing resources of a public school rated D or F toward proven programs and methods linked to improved student achievement until the public school earns a grade of C or better for two consecutive school years.To determine the prioritization of resources of a public school rated D or F, the department must examine any combination of specified factors, including any district or PED data related to AP courses or scores.

In addition, a public post-secondary educational institution, upon request from a New Mexico public high school or district superintendent, must provide a report of students who enroll in the institution within three years of (1) high school graduation; (2) leaving that high school without enrolling in another high school; or (3) earning a high school equivalency credential. The report must indicate Advanced Placement by subject and total credits earned.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A combination of local, state, federal and College Board subsidies will make AP exams available to low-income students for $3 in spring 2016.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. As students develop a next-step plan each year at the end of grades 8-11, students must be reasonably informed about curricular and course options, including AP courses. At least one of the units required for high school graduation must be completed as an AP, honors, dual credit, or online course. As part of the next step plan, the advisor must share information concerning AP, honors, dual credit and distance learning programs. Each next step plan must include one such course, a career-technical course, or pre-apprenticeship program.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

New York
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A combination of federal and other subsidies result in AP exams at $14 for low-income students.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes. To be eligible for a New York state achievement and investment in merit scholarship (NY-AIMS), a student must have graduated from a New York state high school, enrolled in an approved undergraduate program of study in a New York state postsecondary institution beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year or thereafter, and achieved at least two of the following during high school:
  • Graduated with a ≥ 3.3 grade point average
  • Graduated with a “with honors” distinction on a New York state regents diploma or received a score of ≥ 3 on 2 or more AP exams
  • Graduated within the top 15% of their high school class, provided that actual class rank may be taken into consideration.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

North Carolina
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, local boards must ensure that all high school students have access to advanced courses (AP or International Baccalaureate) in language arts, math, science, and social studies. Such access may be provided through enrollment in courses offered through or approved by the North Carolina Virtual Public School.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School report cards must include AP course participation and AP exam participation and performance.

In addition, while not an accountability reporting metric, the state board of education must report annually to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee on advanced courses (AP and IB) in North Carolina. The report must include:
  • The North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership's report to the Department of Public Instruction and the state board's assessment of that report
  • Number of students enrolled in advanced courses and participating in advanced course exams, including demographic information by gender, race, and free and reduced-price lunch status
  • Student performance on advanced course examinations, including information by course, local school administrative unit, and school
  • Number of students participating in 10th grade PSAT/NMSQT testing
  • Number of teachers attending summer institutes offered by the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Distribution of funding appropriated for advanced course testing fees and professional development by local school administrative unit and school
  • Status and efforts of the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Other trends in advanced courses and exams.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The state board of education must seek a partner, such as the College Board, to form the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership (Partnership), to assist in improving college readiness of secondary students and to assist secondary schools to ensure that students have access to high-quality, rigorous academics with a focus on access to AP courses.
In order to implement its responsibilities, the partner selected by the state board must provide staff to, among other duties:
  • Provide professional development to provide AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge, instructional skills, and materials to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and mastery of postsecondary course content
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP courses
  • Provide teachers of grades 7-12 with preadvanced course professional development and materials that prepare students for success in AP courses
  • Provide consulting expertise and technical assistance to support implementation
  • Prioritize assistance to schools designated as low-performing by the state board and provide for frequent visits to the schools targeted by the Partnership.
The Partnership must report annually to the department of public instruction on the Partnership's implementation of its responsibilities. Beginning November 15, 2014, the state board must report annually to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee on advanced courses in North Carolina. The report must include, at a minimum:
  • The North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership's report to the Department of Public Instruction and the state board's assessment of that report
  • Number of students enrolled in advanced courses and participating in advanced course exams, including demographic information by gender, race, and free and reduced-price lunch status
  • Student performance on advanced course exams, including information by course, local school administrative unit, and school
  • Number of students participating in 10th grade PSAT/NMSQT testing
  • Number of teachers attending summer institutes offered by the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Distribution of funding appropriated for advanced course testing fees and professional development by local school administrative unit and school
  • Status and efforts of the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Other trends in advanced courses and examinations.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Statute provides that to the extent funds are made available for this purpose, public school students must be exempt from paying any fees for administration of examinations for advanced courses and registration fees for advanced courses in which the student is enrolled regardless of the score the student achieves on an examination.

Low-income and non-low-income students will pay $0 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied. This applies both to subject-area specific AP exams, as well as AP Research and AP Seminar Exams.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The North Carolina Virtual Public School offers AP courses.

The results of student diagnostic tests, such as the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) and ACT, must be used to identify students prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in advanced courses (AP and IB). Students may also be identified for potential enrollment in advanced courses based on other criteria established by schools to increase access to those courses for their students.

Local boards of education must provide information to students and parents on available opportunities and the enrollment process for students to take advanced courses. The information must explain the value of advanced courses in preparing students for postsecondary level coursework, enabling students to gain access to postsecondary opportunities, and qualifying for scholarships and other financial aid opportunities.

The state board of education must seek a partner, such as the College Board, to form the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership (Partnership), to assist in improving college readiness of secondary students and to assist secondary schools to ensure that students have access to high-quality, rigorous academics with a focus on access to AP courses.
In order to implement its responsibilities, the partner selected by the state board must provide staff to, among other duties:
  • Provide teachers of students in grades seven through 12 with preadvanced course professional development and materials that prepare students for success in Advanced Placement courses.
  • Provide consulting expertise and technical assistance to support implementation.
  • Prioritize assistance to schools designated as low-performing by the State Board of Education and provide for frequent visits to the schools targeted by the Partnership.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No. However, the state board of education strongly endorses that all students enrolled in AP courses take the corresponding AP exams.  This policy must be communicated to all school superintendents, who must annually notify all principals of this policy.

North Dakota
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, in order to be approved by the state superintendent, each public and nonpublic high school must offer one unit of an AP or dual credit course.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Per a March 2016 announcement, for economically disadvantaged students, the state will cover the entire exam fee for up to 4 exams in English, math, science or computer science over the student's high school career. For non-economically disadvantaged students taking AP exams in these subjects, the state will cover the exam fee for the student's first qualifying exam, and will cover 50% of the exam fee for the following 3 qualifying exams over the student's high school career. These exam fee waivers extend to private school, Bureau of Indian Education, and home school students.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes. To be eligible for a North Dakota Academic Scholarship, a student must fulfill one of the required units of academic credit by either an AP course and exam, or dual credit, or non-remedial course via an early entrance program.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The North Dakota Center for Distance Education offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. A credit-by-exam chart outlines the credit hours and equivalent college courses for which students may receive credit for a minimum score on an AP exam.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Ohio
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all public high schools are required to offer at least one advanced standing program, defined as a program that enables a high school student to earn credit toward a degree from an institution of higher education, or that enables a high school student to complete coursework that may earn credit toward a degree from an institution of higher education upon the student's attainment of a specified score on an exam covering the coursework. Advanced standing programs include AP, College Credit Plus (dual enrollment), International Baccalaureate, and early college high school programs.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: District and school report cards include a graded component known as Prepared for Success. Schools or districts earn one point for each student who meets one or more of the following criteria:
  • Achieves a remediation-free score on all parts of the ACT or SAT
  • Earns an industry-recognized credential from the state board's list of acceptable industry-recognized credentials
  • Receives an honors diploma.
A school or district earns an additional .3 point, for a maximum of 1.3 points per student, for each student who, in addition to meeting one or more of the above criteria, also meets one or more of the following criteria: 
  • Earns a ≥ 3 on an AP exam
  • Earns a ≥ 4 on an IB exam
  • Earns ≥ 3 or more non-remediation credits through College Credit Plus.
The department must assign an A - F letter grade for the prepared for success component using specified performance benchmarks (spans of points, i.e., “A” for scores  ≥ 85%. Increasingly higher scores are required to earn each letter grade in 2017-2017 and 2017-2018.

Reporting: School and district accountability reports must include the percentage of students enrolled in a district or building participating in AP classes, and the percentage of those students who received a score of ≥ 3 on AP exams. 
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Each school district and chartered nonpublic high school must provide information about the district or school's advanced standing program(s) (AP and other courses allowing students to earn college credit) to all students in grades 8-11. The information must include: 
  • The process colleges and universities use in awarding credit for AP courses and exams, including minimum scores required by state institutions of higher education for a student to receive college credit
  • The availability of tuition and fee waivers for AP courses and exams
  • The availability of online AP courses, including those that may be available at no cost
  • The benefits of earning postsecondary credit through AP courses
  • The availability of AP courses offered throughout the district
The district or school may include additional information as determined appropriate by the district or school.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. A score of ≥ 3 will provide credit at any Ohio public institution of higher education. The credit must count towards graduation and meet a general education requirement if the course to which the AP credit is equivalent fulfills a requirement at the receiving institution. The state AP policy also provides that when it clearly enhances a student's opportunity for success, an institution should strongly advise that an AP score of ≥ 4 is needed for a student to be successful in a subsequent course in a highly dependent sequence of courses in a STEM area. For example, an advisor should strongly recommend that an AP score of ≥ 4 is needed on the AP Chemistry exam in order for the student to be successful in the second chemistry course.

In addition, a score of ≥ 3 on an AP foreign language exam will provide credit for at least the first year of foreign language at any public 2- or 4-year institution.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The chancellor of higher education must require all baccalaureate-awarding state institutions of higher education to submit a statement describing how each major for which the school offers a baccalaureate degree may be completed within three academic years. The statement may include, but is not limited to including, any of enumerated methods to contribute to earning a baccalaureate degree in three years, including AP credit.

Oklahoma
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Through the Oklahoma Advanced Placement Incentive Program, the state board may award schools a one-time equipment and materials grants of up to $5,000 for each AP course. A school receiving a grant must offer the AP course beginning the school year after receiving the grant. The state board may award additional grants to school sites demonstrating successful implementation of the courses for which the first grants were awarded. (Successful implementation includes, but is not limited to, the class having been reported on the Application for Accreditation Coded Class Schedule; a student having completed the relevant AP exam; a student having scored 3 or better on the AP exam; or. evidence of activities to prepare growing numbers of students for the challenges offered by AP classes.) Schools may qualify for additional grants a minimum of 4 years after receiving a grant award. Second-time grants of up to $2,500 may be awarded.

In addition, vertical team grants may be awarded to prepare growing numbers of students for the challenges offered by AP courses. Vertical team grants are content area and team-based. A school district may apply for a vertical team grant for a content area team from a high school and its feeder middle level school(s). The vertical team must include at least one representative from each grade level in the content area for grades 7-12.

Consolidated districts, districts combined by annexation, and districts that have entered into a mutual contract with a superintendent must have for 3 consecutive years after consolidation, annexation or the effective date of the mutual contract preference for allocations for various state board funds, including AP Incentive funds.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. In calculating a high school's A - F grade, a school may receive one bonus point for meeting the criteria for an “A” for performance or participation of students in AP courses or other enumerated advanced academic or CTE courses. Specifically, the criteria for earning an “A” for participation or performance in advanced coursework aer met if the school achieves either a student participation rate of ≥ 70% in accelerated coursework (student passes AP or other advanced course), or a student performance rate of ≥ 90% in accelerated coursework (in case of AP, student enrolled in course, earns "C" or higher, and earns ≥ on AP exam). A school earns credit for every course in which a student demonstrates the required level of performance.

In addition, while not a metric for high school accountability reporting, the state department of education must annually report to the governor and house and senate education committees on the Advanced Placement Incentive Program for the previous school year. The report must include: 
  • The number of students taking an AP exam and the number of exams taken
  • The number of exams receivinh a ≥ 3 score
  • The number of school sites that received funding and the amount of awards, by type of award
  • The number of school sites offering AP courses and the number of school sites with students taking an AP exam
  • The number of students receiving test assistance and the average amount of assistance
  • An evaluation of the cost versus the benefits of this program.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Schools may be awarded a one-time equipment and/or instructional materials grant to provide an AP course. A school receiving a grant must provide the College Board training within one year of the grant award, including at least a one-week summer institute, among other criteria. Teachers must be encouraged to attend annual follow-up training.

The state board may award schools subsidized training for AP courses or pre-AP courses, or grants for developing AP vertical teams. "Vertical teams" are defined in statute as a group of middle/junior high school and high school educators in a given discipline who work cooperatively to develop and implement a vertically aligned program aimed at helping students acquire the academic skills necessary for success in the AP program. More details on grants available for AP training grants and vertical team grants available here.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who take more than one AP exam in a school year will have a portion of their examination fee paid by the state department of education. In 2016, non-low-income students taking 2 or more exams pay $67 per exam. In addition, a combination of local, state, and College Board subsidies make the cost of AP exams $10 for low-income students, regardless of the number of exams a low-income student takes in a year. More details here.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state board is authorized to award schools grants to support vertical team training. Vertical team grants are content area and team-based. A school district may apply for a vertical team grant for a content area team from a high school and its feeder middle level school(s). The vertical team must include at least one representative from each grade level in the content area for grades 7-12.

Grants are also available for pre-AP course training. 
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Oregon
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all districts must offer accelerated college credit programs, which include AP as well as dual credit, two-plus-two, and International Baccalaureate programs. Districts must provide students in grades 9-12 with accelerated college credit programs in English, math, and science, or ensure students in grades 9-12 have online access to accelerated college credit programs, including those related to English, math and science.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. "Accelerated college credit programs" include AP, dual credit, two-plus-two, and International Baccalaureate programs. The department of education must administer a program that provides grants for:
  • Student books, materials, and other course costs other than exam fees
  • Classroom supplies for accelerated college credit programs.
Any school district, community college district or state institution of higher education may individually or jointly apply for a grant.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No. However, each school district must annually report to the department of education the types of accelerated college credit programs offered, including AP.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. "Accelerated college credit programs" include AP, dual credit, two-plus-two, and International Baccalaureate programs. The department of education must administer a program that provides grants for education or training of current or prospective teachers providing instruction in accelerated college credit programs, among other purposes.

Any school district, community college district or state institution of higher education may apply individually or jointly for a grant. If a grant is awarded to provide education or training to current or prospective teachers providing instruction in an accelerated college credit program, the amount of the grant may not exceed 1/3 of the total cost of the education or training. In addition, the department may award the grant on the condition that the teacher, school district, community college district and state institution of higher education pay the balance of the cost of the education or training in a proportion agreed to by the teacher, districts and institution. The department may also enter into agreements with school districts, community college districts and state institutions of higher education related to the funding to provide education or training to current or prospective teachers in an accelerated college credit program.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A combination of local, state, federal, and College Board subsidies result in AP exams at no cost to low-income students in 2015-16. In addition, AP exams are available at $33 to private school students qualifying for test fee reduction, and, as a result of state funding, $59 to public school and home school students who do not qualify for the test fee reduction.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The department of education must contract with a nonprofit entity to administer a nationally normed assessment to all public school 10th graders. The contracted assessment must identify students with high potential to excel in AP or other honors courses based on a research-based correlation of scores on the 10th grade assessment to AP exams. Through a Request for Proposals process, the department of education selected the PSAT/NMSQT.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. The Higher Education Coordinating Commission annually approves AP exam scores for which public 2- and 4-year institutions must award minimum postsecondary credit.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The Oregon Virtual School District has partnered with APEX Learning to offer their AP Exam Review and Preparation courses to Oregon public school students at no additional cost.  After schools submit the online student registration form, students have unlimited access to self-paced review courses.

Pennsylvania
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. One of the 14 purposes districts may apply annual accountability grants towards is establishing, expanding or maintaining programs to strengthen high school curricula by offering additional AP or other rigorous high school courses.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. High school accountability reports include the number of AP courses offered.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Public and private school students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Rhode Island
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, LEAs are required to establish pathways that represent a set of courses and other programs within its guaranteed and viable comprehensive course of study and that provide students with the means to meet their academic and career goals. AP is one such option to meet this requirement.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes. The department must issue a report to the general assembly on the AP teacher training program that includes:
  • The number of students taking AP courses at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas of English, math, science, and social studies
  • The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas.
  • The remaining unmet need for trained teachers in school entities that do not offer AP courses.
In addition, any school district offering AP courses must publish on the district website the names of the AP courses being offered.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Statute provides that the purpose of the Advanced Placement (AP) teacher training program is to provide access to AP courses in the 4 core academic areas of English, math, science and social science for all students by training teachers in AP course instruction at all high schools that do not presently provide AP courses.

Subject to appropriation, the AP teacher training program is established in the department of education by the board of regents to train teachers in eligible school entities to teach AP courses in English, math, science and social science. Eligible school entities are defined as those that do not have in each of their high schools at least one AP course in the 4 core academic areas. A school district with an AP course in one or more of the 4 core academic areas but not in all 4 core academic areas is only eligible to have a teacher trained in those core academic areas in which it does not have an AP course. No more than one teacher per core academic area in each high school of an eligible school district may be trained under this program. More than one eligible school district may apply jointly to the program to train a teacher in AP course instruction if that teacher is to provide such instruction in more than one school district either through classroom instruction or through virtual learning instruction. To the extent funds are appropriated for this program, the department must provide grants per eligible teacher to the endorsed entities providing AP teacher training upon completion of the training program.

The application by an eligible school district seeking funding for the program must include:
  • The subject areas that currently have an AP course in each of its high schools
  • The subject areas among the 4 core academic areas that it does not have an AP course in each of its high schools
  • The names of the eligible teachers including the high school where they are teaching and the AP subject area that each teacher will be providing instruction and whether the instruction will be in a classroom or through virtual learning
  • The names of the eligible teacher training entities that will be providing the AP teacher training
  • Agreement to provide the AP course for at least 3 years
  • Guidelines the district will use in determining which students may be eligible to enroll in an AP course. The district may not discriminate on any basis in enrollment of students that is illegal under applicable federal or state law
  • Agreement to annually report to the department for each of the 4 core academic areas that were taught by teachers whose training was funded by this program
    • The number of students taking AP courses
    • The number of students who took the AP exam
    • The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on the AP exam.
Statute provides that if insufficient funds are appropriated to provide funding for all eligible applying school entities, the department must prioritize funding of eligible school entities based on school district poverty level.

Statute also directs the department to promulgate rules, regulations and procedures necessary for the implementation of the Access to Advanced Placement Courses for All Students Act, including:
  • In consultation with the College Board, certify those teacher-training entities qualified to provide AP teacher training in the 4 core academic areas. In certifying teacher-training entities for this program, the department must ensure that the training times and locations are geographically accessible for teachers from eligible school entities
  • The department, in consultation with the College Board, must ensure that teacher training provides AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams
  • Starting at the end of the first year of the program, and every year thereafter, the department must issue a report to the general assembly on the AP teacher training program that includes:
    • The number of teachers receiving AP teacher training in school entities, school districts and high schools in each of the 4 core academic areas
    • The number of students taking AP courses at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas
    • The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas.
    • The remaining unmet need for trained teachers in school entities that do not offer AP courses.
Subject to appropriation, the state board of governors for higher education and the state board of regents for elementary and secondary education must work jointly to establish clear, specific, and challenging training guidelines that require AP teachers to obtain recognized AP training endorsed by the College Board. AP and pre-AP training must do all of the following:
  • Provide AP teachers and teachers in courses that lead to AP with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced course examinations and mastery of postsecondary course content.
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools.
  • Provide middle grade, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP course success.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
In addition, statute directs the state board of regents to seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement incentive program and the Math-Science partnership program, and use it to support Advanced Placement and pre-Advanced Placement teacher professional development, and to support the implementation of an integrated instructional program for students in grades 6-12 in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in Advanced Placement courses and in college.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Subject to appropriation, the state board of governors for higher education and the state board of regents for elementary and secondary education must work jointly to establish clear, specific, and challenging training guidelines that require Advanced Placement teachers to obtain recognized Advanced Placement training endorsed by the College Board.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Advanced Coursework Network, to be launched in fall 2016, will extend Advanced Placement (AP) and other advanced course opportunities across the state. Public schools and districts may join as network providers to offer new or existing advanced courses, and/or as network members, to allow their students to enroll in network courses. Courses will be offered by LEAs, community-based organizations, and institutions of higher education.

In addition, any district offering AP courses must notify parents of their availability and the guidelines the district uses in determining which students may be eligible to enroll in an AP course. The district must also publish on the district website the names of the AP courses the district offers, and the guidelines the district uses in determining which students may be eligible to enroll in an AP course.

Statute directs the state board of regents to focus state and federal AP funding on activities that target school districts serving high concentrations of low-income students.

The department of education must work with school districts that have the lowest graduation rates. The department must develop specific methods of targeted intervention or identify appropriate existing methods for districts with a dropout rate greater than 15% as determined by the department. One of the intervention methods the department may recommend is increased availability of AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The board of regents must encourage school districts to offer rigorous courses in grades 6-11 that prepare students for the demands of AP courses, and to encourage school districts to make it a goal that all 10th graders take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholars Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) so that test results will provide each high school with student assessment data that guidance counselors and teachers can use to identify students who are prepared or who need additional work to be prepared to enroll and be successful in AP courses, using a research-based AP identification program provided by the College Board.

The state board of regents must, subject to appropriation:
  • Provide a communication plan that includes disseminating to parents materials emphasizing the importance of AP or other advanced courses to a student's ability to gain access to, and to succeed in, postsecondary education and materials that emphasize the importance of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholars Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), which provides diagnostic feedback on skills and relates students' scores to the probability of success in AP courses and exams, and disseminating this information to students, teachers, counselors, administrators, school districts, public community colleges, and state universities.
  • Annually evaluate the impact of the College and Career Success for All Students Act on student enrollment and success rates in AP courses, high school graduation rates, and college enrollment retention and completion rates.
The department of education must work with school districts that have the lowest graduation rates. The department must develop specific methods of targeted intervention or identify appropriate existing methods for districts with a dropout rate greater than 15% as determined by the department. One of the intervention methods the department may recommend is increased availability of AP courses.

South Carolina
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. Each school district must provide AP courses in all secondary schools that enroll an adequate number of academically talented students to support the course. Statute directs the state board to determine what constitutes an adequate number of students for an AP course. State board policy requires all schools serving grades 11 and 12 to offer ≥ 1 AP course(s).
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. The Department of Education must fund and coordinate AP teacher training courses. Each teacher of an AP course is required to have completed the appropriate AP 3-graduate-hour training program or have successfully completed 45 hours of training provided by College Board endorsed professional development opportunities verified by the appropriate college or university. Newly assigned teachers of AP courses have one calendar year to meet the AP course training requirements. Teachers who hold a PhD. in their subject area may have the training waived.

AP teachers must meet annually with their Professional Growth and Development Plan evaluators to discuss appropriate goal setting and/or revision. The plan may include, but is not limited to, College Board workshops and professional development opportunities.

An AP endorsement may be added to a teaching certificate.

AP Teacher Institutes are hosted at postsecondary institutions across the state.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Low-income students will pay $0 in spring 2016 after grants are applied; non-low-income students will pay either $0 or $9 if the school does not forego its rebate.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes, for scores of ≥ 3. South Carolina Commission on Higher Education policy establishes parameters for total AP credits and English credits that may be awarded.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit Yes
Unique characteristics Legislation states the purpose of administering college- and career-readiness assessments and WorkKeys assessments to 11th graders is to provide instructional information to assist students, parents, and teachers to plan for each student's course selection, which may include AP courses.

South Dakota
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. A combination of local, state, federal, and College Board subsidies result in three AP exams at no cost to low-income students in 2015-16.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The South Dakota Virtual School offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. All institutions under the board of regents award credit for AP scores of ≥ 3.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Tennessee
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, if a district offers AP courses, it must annually approve a list of AP courses, provide this list to the public, and ensure that approved courses substantially incorporate the learning objectives and course descriptions as defined by the College Board.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No. However, statute authorizes a school to establish an AP fund to receive donations or grants from individuals or from private corporations, associations or other artificial entities, both nonprofit and for profit, who wish to help support an AP program offered or attempted to be established by the school. Monies in such fund must be used solely for academic enhancement in support of the program for which the fund was created. The principal of each school establishing a fund must appoint a committee responsible for determining how funds will be used.

In addition, a parent of an eligible student with disabilities may open an individualized education account that may defray any of a number of educational costs, including AP exam fees.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. The commissioner of education must publish an annual report that includes:
  • A list of the AP courses offered in each LEA
  • A list of the AP courses offered in each of the LEA's schools that serve grades in which AP courses could be taken
  • The number of students taking AP courses
  • The percentage of students scoring 3 or above on AP exams, by LEA and by school.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. An AP computer science teacher must have a valid Tennessee teacher license with an endorsement grades 7-12 and have completed the equivalent of 12 semester hours of computer course work including six semester hours of programming.
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.

2013 legislation created a two-year pilot to determine whether covering AP exam fees increased the number of students pursuing completion of rigorous course work and passing AP exams. In accordance with the legislation, the office of research and education accountability, in the office of the comptroller of the treasury, submitted a report to the legislature in late 2015 on the outcome of the pilot.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. The consortium for cooperative innovative education is comprised of the chancellor of the board of regents, the president of the University of Tennessee system, the executive director of the Tennessee higher education commission, the executive director of the state board of education, and the commissioner of education (or the designees of any of these). One of the charges to the consortium is the creation of marketing channels to advise students of early postsecondary education opportunities, including AP.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Information in student handbooks for schools serving grades 8-12 must include college preparatory and AP courses provided by high schools in the LEA. In addition, during an annual lottery scholarship day before students schedule courses for grades 8-11, schools must provide certain information to students and their parents, including information on the academic value of enrollment and success in college preparatory and AP courses in high school.

If a local education agency elects to offer AP courses, it must annually approve a list of such courses, and make this list readily available to the public.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. However, Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) policy recommends that all TBR community colleges award specified amounts of postsecondary credit for certain AP exam scores.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics In fall 2015, the Tennessee Board of Regents unveiled free, self-paced, online AP exam prep courses in English and statistics, available to students across the country, and developed byTennessee Board of Regents community college and university faculty. Courses may also be used by high school instructors to augment their AP curriculum.

Public school students who complete a specified high school curriculum may graduate early and be eligible for unconditional entry into a public two-year institution of higher education or conditional entry into a public four-year institution of higher education. Under this option, students must complete at least two AP, IB, dual enrollment or dual credit courses.

A student will be recognized as graduating with "state distinction" by attaining a B or better average and completing one of eight criteria, including earning a score of 3 or higher on at least 2 AP exams.

Texas
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all districts are required to offer students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of at least 12 semester credit hours of college credit in high school, via AP, IB, dual credit, articulated postsecondary courses provided for local credit or articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit courses provided for state credit, or any combination thereof.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Statute authorizes a school to be awarded $100 for each student who scores ≥ 3 on an AP exam. The principal of each school participating in the program must convene, at least annually, a team of up to five members, with at least three teachers, to include at least one AP teacher and at least one teacher who teaches students in preparation for AP participation, to determine the use of funds awarded. 

Statute also authorizes a one-time award of $250 for teaching an AP course for the first time, and $50 to be deposited in the teacher bonus pool for each student in the school that scores ≥ 3 on an AP exam. AP teachers may be awarded a share of the teacher bonus pool, which must be distributed by the teacher's school in shares proportional to the number of courses taught.

While statute provides schools may receive a one-time $3,000 equipment grant for providing an AP course, the $3,000 equipment grant was last funded in the 2002-2003 biennium.

A school district is entitled to an annual allotment of $275 for each student in average daily attendance in grades 9-12 in the district. A school district or campus must use these funds for one or more of specified uses to advance rigorous coursework, including to implement or administer a program that encourages students to pursue advanced academic opportunities, including AP courses. At an open meeting of the board of trustees, each school district must establish annual performance goals for programs, activities, and strategies implemented with high school allotment funds related to the certain performance indicators, including enrollment in advanced courses, including AP courses.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: Performance indicators for high schools must include the percentage of students who have completed an AP course.

Reporting: Texas Performance Reporting System (TPRS) postsecondary readiness indicators include, among others:
  • Advanced/Dual Credit Course Completion
  •  AP/IB course participation
  • AP/IB performance.
In addition, the commissioner must establish in rule an academic distinction designation for districts and campuses for outstanding performance in attainment of postsecondary readiness. The commissioner must adopt criteria for the designation, including percentages of students who earned an AP exam score to be awarded college credit.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. An AP teacher may receive a subsidy of up to $450 for teacher training.

In the definition of "College Board Advanced Placement," state board regulations require that a College Board-approved AP Program foster teacher professional development.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $7 in spring 2016 after state, federal, and College Board grants are applied.

In addition, statute authorizes:
  • A student earning ≥ 3 on an AP exam to receive up to $65 reimbursement for the testing fee. The reimbursement must be reduced by the amount of any subsidy awarded by the College Board. However, according to a June 2007 Texas Education Agency report, the $65 test fee reimbursement has never been funded by the state.
  • A student demonstrating financial need to be entitled to a subsidy for an AP exam fee paid by the student. On approval by the state board, the state education agency may pay each eligible applicant an equal amount, not to exceed $25 for each applicant.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores Yes. To receive an initial TEXAS (Towards EXcellence, Access, and Success) grant, a student who is a first-time undergraduate must be a graduate of a public or accredited private high school in Texas who completed the foundation high school program or its equivalent and have met any two or more of the following academic eligibility requirements:
  • Earning of the equivalent of at least 12 semester credit hours of college credit in high school via AP, IB, dual credit, or postsecondary articulated coursework, or successful completion of the course requirements of the IB diploma program
  • Satisfaction of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) college readiness benchmarks prescribed by the coordinating board on any assessment instrument designated by the coordinating board, or qualification for an exemption
  • Graduation in the top one-third of the person's high school graduating class or graduation from high school with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4-point scale or the equivalent
  • Completion for high school credit of at least one advanced math course following the successful completion of an Algebra II course or at least one advanced career and technical or technology applications course.
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. A public junior college may enter into an articulation agreement to partner with one or more school districts located in the public junior college district to provide on the campus of the public junior college a dropout recovery program for students under 26 years of age who meet certain criteria. A public junior college entering into such an agreement must offer advanced academic and transition opportunities, including dual credit courses and college preparatory courses, such as AP courses.

An interim benchmark payment of $250 is authorized for any, not to exceed 4, of 7 benchmarks achieved by an eligible student participating in the program, including a student who earns a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. Each school year, a school district must notify the parent of each district student enrolled in grade nine or above of the availability of programs in the district under which a student may earn college credit, including AP programs. A district may provide this notification on its website. The notification must include the name and contact information of any public or private entity in the district offering a program allowing high school students to earn college credit.

In addition, during the first school year a student is enrolled in a high school or at the high school level in a charter school, and again during each year of a student's enrollment at the high school level, a school counselor must provide information about postsecondary education to the student and the student's parent. The information must include information on the availability of programs in the district under which a student may earn college credit, including AP programs.

The Texas Virtual School offers AP courses. Statute directs the administering authority of the state virtual school network to conduct certain activities to ensure that a full range of electronic courses, including AP courses, are offered to students in the state. An AP course must have documented approval from the College Board as an AP course prior to submission for Texas Virtual School Network course review.

In the definition of "College Board Advanced Placement," state board regulations require that a College Board-approved AP Program provide access to AP courses for all students willing to enroll in the rigorous academic curriculum of AP courses as prescribed by the College Board.

The standards for the Exploring Careers course for students in grades 7-8 call for the student to analyze college and career opportunities. The student is expected to explore opportunities for earning college credit in high school such as AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Each institution of higher education that offers freshman-level courses must adopt and implement a policy to grant undergraduate course credit to entering freshman students who have earned qualifying scores on AP exams. In establishing the minimum required AP exam score for granting course credit for a particular lower-division course, an institution of higher education may not require a score above 3 unless the institution's chief academic officer determines, based on evidence, that a higher score on the exam is necessary to indicate a student is sufficiently prepared to be successful in a related, more advanced course for which the lower-division course is a prerequisite.

Institutional policies must:
  • Establish the institution's conditions for granting course credit, including the minimum required scores on AP exams
  • Identify the specific course credit or other academic requirements of the institution, including the number of semester credit hours or other course credit, that the institution will grant to a student who achieves required scores on AP exams, based on correlations identified by the higher education coordinating board between the subject matter and content of courses offered by each institution of higher education and the subject matter and content of courses and examinations in the AP program.
In addition, the higher education coordinating board, in consultation with institutions of higher education, the board's Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee, and other interested parties, must conduct a study on the performance of undergraduate students at institutions of higher education who receive undergraduate course credit for achieving required scores on one or more AP exams. The study must compare the academic performance, retention rates, and graduation rates at institutions of higher education of students who complete a lower-division course at an institution and students who receive credit for that course for a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam, disaggregated by score. A progress report is due by January 2017 and a final report must be submitted to the governor, the lieutenant governor, the speaker of the house of representatives, and the standing legislative committees with primary jurisdiction over higher education by January 2019 regarding the results of the study and any recommendations for legislative or administrative action.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board must collaborate to identify each school district with one or more high schools that has had an average of at least 26 students in the high school graduating class during the preceding 5 years, and for any 2 consecutive years during the preceding 5 years, have been among the lowest 10% of high schools in the state in the percentage of students graduating from the high school and enrolling for the following academic year in an institution of higher education. 

A district notified by the state education agency as meeting these criteria must enter into an agreement with the Texas public institution of higher education in closest geographic proximity to the district to develop a plan to increase the percentage of the district's graduating seniors who enroll in an institution of higher education for the academic year following graduation. A plan developed under these provisions:
  • Must establish clear, achievable goals for increasing the percentage of the district's graduating seniors, particularly the graduating seniors attending a high school described above, who enroll in an institution of higher education for the academic year following graduation
  • Must establish an accurate method of measuring progress toward the goals established in the plan, which may include the percentage of district high school students and the percentage of students attending a district high school who are enrolled in a course for which a student may earn college credit, including an AP course.
A district must permit a home-schooled student entitled to attend public school in the district to participate in an administration of the PSAT/NMSQT or an AP exam. Home-schooled students pay the same amount for each AP exam as students enrolled in the district are required to pay. A district must post on its website the date the PSAT/NMSQT will be administered and the date any AP exams will be administered. The noticemust state that the PSAT/NMSQT or the AP exam is available for home-schooled students eligible to attend school in the district, and describe the procedures for a home-schooled student to register for the test.

Utah
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Under the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program, the state board distributes funds to school districts and charter schools according to a state board formula. The distribution formula may include an allocation of funds for AP courses, among other purposes. The state board formula includes an allocation of funds for AP courses. The portion allocated to AP equals 0.38 multiplied by the difference between the funds appropriated for the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program less the allotment.

The state board must develop performance criteria to measure the effectiveness of the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program and annually report to the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee on the program's effectiveness. Under state board regulation, all LEAs receiving program funds are required to submit to the state office of education an annual evaluation report that includes, among other metrics, the number of AP classes taken, completed, and exams passed with a score of 3 or above by identified students. 
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School and district accountability reports must include: 
  • The number of students taking AP courses
  • The number and percent of students taking a specific AP course who take AP tests
  • The number and percent of AP test-takers passing the AP test
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Under the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program, the state board distributes appropriated funds to school districts and charter schools in accordance with a state board-determined formula. The distribution formula may include an allocation for AP test fees for students who qualify for free and reduced-price lunch who take an AP test and have applied for the AP test fee reduction. Under state board regulation, all LEAs are eligible to apply for the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program funds. The distribution formula includes an allocation of money for AP courses, whereby the total funds designated for the AP Program are divided by the total number of AP exams on which students earned ≥ 3 score. Each participating LEA receives that amount for each exam passed by one of its students.

The state board must develop criteria to measure the effectiveness of the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program and annually report to the Public Education Appropriations Subcommittee on the program's effectiveness. The report must include data showing the use and impact of money allocated for AP test fees of eligible low-income students. Under state board regulation, all LEAs receiving program funds are required to submit to the state office of education an annual evaluation report that includes, among other metrics, the number of AP classes taken, completed, and exams passed with a score of 3 or above by identified students. 

Low-income students whose districts and schools are not involved in the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program will pay $53 in spring 2016 for each subject-specific AP exam, and $100 for each AP Research and AP Seminar exam, after College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. Statute directs the state board of education, in collaboration with the state board of regents, to implement an AP program that permits students to earn high school credits while qualifying to take AP exams for college credit. The delivery system and curriculum program msut be designed and implemented to take full advantage of the most current available educational technology.
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The state makes available the Enhancement for Accelerated Students Program, through which LEAs may apply for funds to support AP courses and AP exam fees for low-income students who have applied for an AP test fee reduction, as well as to support IB and gifted and talented programs. LEAs have a process for identifying students with accelerated academic achievement based upon multiple assessment instruments. These instruments may not be solely dependent upon English vocabulary or comprehension skills and must take into consideration abilities of culturally diverse students and students with disabilities.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Students may fulfill the math requirement in the General Education Core by scoring ≥ 3 on AP Calculus AB, Calculus BC, or Statistics. Three-credit Writing requirement in General Education Core may also be fulfilled by scores on AP English exams.

In addition, the board of regents is required to identify minimum scores and maximum credit for each AP exam. Utah System of Higher Education policy provides that scores of ≥ 3 may receive a maximum of 10 semester hours of credit for a foreign language exam, up to 8 semester hours of credit for a full year course, or up to 4 semester hours of credit for a half year course. Institutions may determine appropriate AP scores in academic departments for which there are AP exams.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, students must demonstrate mathematics competency by any of a number of means in order to graduate from high school. For a student pursuing a college degree after graduation, one of the means of demonstrating math competency is by scoring ≥ 3 on an AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, or AP Statistics exam.

The Centennial Scholarship for Early Graduation is available to students who graduate early. Regulation provides that AP exams are one of the means for students to earn high school credit via demonstrated proficiency by assessment.

2016 legislation directs the University of Utah to partner with all state universities to develop concurrent enrollment courses that are age-appropriate foreign language courses for eligible accelerated foreign language students. The legislation defines an "accelerated foreign language student" as a student in grades 10-12 who has passed a world language AP exam.

Vermont
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP No
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Virginia
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No. However, all high schools must offer at least 3 AP, IB or Cambridge courses, college-level courses for degree credit, or any combination thereof.

In addition, 2016 S.B. 336 directs the state board, in establishing graduation requirements, to require all students to either (1) complete an AP, honors, or International Baccalaureate course or (2) earn a state board-approved career and technical education credential.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School accountability reports must include percentage of students who take AP courses and percentage of students who take AP tests.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied. 

School districts must notify students and their parents of the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take AP exams. In addition, school boards must notify home school students and their parents of the availability of AP exams and the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take these exams.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Virginia Department of Education's Virtual Virginia offers AP and pre-AP courses. 

School districts must implement a plan to notify students and their parents of the availability of AP classes, the qualifications for enrolling in such classes and programs, and the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take AP exams. In addition, school boards must implement a plan to notify students receiving home instruction and their parents of the availability of AP exams and the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take these exams. School boards must implement a plan to make these exams available to students receiving home instruction.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Each public institution of higher education's governing board must implement policies to grant undergraduate course credit to entering freshman who have successfully taken one or more AP exams. The policies must outline the conditions necessary for the institution to grant course credit, including the minimum required scores on AP exams. Each public institution of higher education's governing board must report to the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia the policies adopted and implemented in compliance with these provisions, and make the policies available on the institution's website.

Effective July 2016, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (Council), in consultation with each public institution of higher education's governing board, must establish a policy for granting undergraduate course credit to entering freshman students who have taken one or more AP exams. The policy must: 
  •  Outline the conditions necessary for each public institution of higher education to grant course credit, including the minimum required scores on such exams
  • Identify each public institution of higher education's course credit or other academic requirements that the student satisfies by achieving the minimum required scores on such exams
  • Ensure, to the extent possible, that the grant of course credit is consistent across each public institution of higher education and each such exam.
The policy must be posted to the council's and to each public institution of higher education's website.

In addition, each institution within the Virginia Community College System must develop agreements for postsecondary degree attainment with the public high schools in the school divisions that they serve, specifying the options for students to complete an associate's degree or a one-year Uniform Certificate of General Studies concurrent with a high school diploma. Such agreements must specify the credit available for AP exam scores of ≥ 3.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics School boards must implement a plan to notify students receiving home instruction and their parents of the availability of AP exams and the availability of financial assistance to low-income and needy students to take these exams. School boards must implement a plan to make these exams available to students receiving home instruction.

Students who complete the requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma with an average grade of “B” or better, and successfully complete college-level coursework that will earn the student at least nine transferable college credits in AP, IB, Cambridge, or dual enrollment courses will receive the Governor's Seal on the diploma.

Washington
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support AP curriculum development, technology, and textbook fees, among other purposes.

The other half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction to districts as an incentive award for each student who earned dual high school and college credit (including by earning a ≥ 3 on an AP exam) via a course offered by the district during the previous school year. Districts must distribute the award to the high schools that generated the funds. The award amount for low-income students eligible to participate in the federal free and reduced-price meals program who earn dual credits must be set at 125% of the base award for other students. A student who earns more than one dual credit in the same school year counts only once for the purposes of the incentive award. If a high school provides access to online courses for students to earn dual high school and college credit at no cost to the student, such a course is considered to be offered by the high school.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability and reporting. Accountability: The "Career and College Readiness" performance indicator includes the percent of students earning high school credit in a dual credit program or earning a state or nationally recognized industry certification for all students group and targeted subgroups. "Dual credit" is defined to include AP, IB, Running Start, College in the High School, Tech Prep, and other courses intended to give students advanced credit toward career pathways or degrees. 

Reporting: Accountability report cards indicate the rates at which students earn college credit through a dual credit course, including by earning a score of ≥ 3 on an AP exam.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must also annually report to the education and higher education committees of the legislature on student participation rates and academic performance in dual credit programs, including AP.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support AP teacher training, among other purposes.
State subsidies for testing fees Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support exam fees.

Low-income students whose schools are not involved in the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program will pay $15 per exam in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The superintendent of public instruction must notify high schools and any other public school serving 9th graders of the names and contact information of public and private entities offering programs leading to college credit, including information about online AP classes, if the superintendent has knowledge of such entities and if the cost of reporting these entities is minimal. Each senior high school and any other public school serving 9th graders must annually provide each parent of a student in grades 9-12 with information on the entrance requirements and the availability of local programs that lead to college credit, including classes such as AP. The information may be included with other information the school regularly mails to parents. In addition, each high school and any other public school serving 9th graders must enclose the names and contact information of other public or private entities offering such programs, including online AP programs, to its grade 9-12 students if the school has knowledge of such entities.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must compile and post on the office website information about online learning programs for high school students to earn college credit, including via AP courses. Examples of information to be compiled and placed on the website include links to purveyors of online learning programs, comparisons among various types of programs regarding costs or awarding of credit, advantages and disadvantages of online learning programs, and other general assistance and guidance for students, teachers, and counselors in selecting and considering online learning programs. High schools must ensure that teachers and counselors have information about online learning programs for high school students to earn college credit and are able to assist parents and students in accessing the information. High schools must ensure that parents and students have opportunities to learn about online learning programs under these provisions.

In addition, Insight School of Washington offers a variety of AP courses.

Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. To be eligible for a grant, a district must have adopted an academic acceleration policy. In making grant awards, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must give priority to grants for high schools with a high proportion of low-income students and high schools seeking to develop new capacity for dual credit courses rather than proposing marginal expansion of current capacity.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must annually report information to the education policy committees and the fiscal committees of the legislature about the demographics of the students earning dual credits in the schools receiving grants for the prior school year. Demographic data must be disaggregated by White, Black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, Pacific Islander/Hawaiian Native, low income, transitional bilingual, migrant, special education, and students covered by section 504 of the federal rehabilitation act of 1973.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Every two years, the institutions of higher education must collaboratively develop a master list of postsecondary courses that can be fulfilled by achieving benchmark scores on AP or other recognized college-level proficiency exams. Courses on the master list fulfill lower division general education requirements or postseondary career and technical education requirements. From the master list, each institution must create and publish a list of its courses that can be satisfied by successful proficiency exam scores. The requirements to develop a master list do not apply if an institution has a clearly published policy of awarding credit for AP or other recognized college-level placement exams and does not require those credits to meet specific course requirements but generally applies those credits towards degree requirements.

In addition, each institution of higher education, in designing its certificate, technical degree program, two-year academic transfer program, or first-year student and sophomore courses of a baccalaureate program, must recognize the equivalencies of at least one year of course credit and maximize the application of the credits toward lower division general education requirements that can be earned through successfully demonstrating proficiency on exams, including AP exams. To the extent possible, institutions must agree on examination qualifying scores and demonstrated competencies for the credits or courses under subsection (3) of this section, with scores equivalent to qualified or well-qualified. Nothing in this subsection shall prevent an institution of higher education from adopting policies using higher scores for additional purposes.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics The office of the superintendent of public instruction must provide professional development, technical assistance, and guidance for school districts to develop career and technical course equivalencies that also qualify as AP courses.

West Virginia
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP Yes. All high schools must offer at least 1 AP course each in English, math, science, and social studies.
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success Yes. The state must allocate 1% of the state average per pupil state aid multiplied by the number of students enrolled in dual credit, AP and international baccalaureate courses, distributed to the counties proportionate to enrollment in these courses in each county.
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for accountability. School accountability reports must include:
  • Percentages of 10th-12th graders who took an AP course
  • Percentages of 10th-12th graders who took an AP exam
  • Percentage of 12th graders who earned ≥ 3 on an AP exam.
Data will be reported for comparison at the school level with county, state, regional, and national data.
State programs and funding for teacher training Yes. All AP courses must be taught by a teacher who has completed the required professional development, which includes an AP Summer Institute (APSI) delivered through the West Virginia Center for Professional Development (WVCPD) or other College Board-endorsed APSI. AP teachers must attend an APSI once every three years after completing the initial APSI. AP teachers may also meet the requirement for attendance at the APSI by holding an AP credential (see below).

An administrator from each high school must attend a WVCPD College Board endorsed AP related workshop once every two years. All AP coordinators must attend an AP Coordinator's workshop annually.

The Advanced Placement Credential is valid for 3 years. An applicant for licensure must hold a valid West Virginia Professional Certificate, successfully complete the AP Course Audit required by the College Board, be recommended by the county superintendent, and complete one of the following:
  • 30-clock hour College Board-endorsed AP Summer Institute or an equivalent College Board-endorsed AP Summer Institute offered through the WVCPD or an out-of-state provider endorsed by the College Board. All professional development for the initial AP Teacher Advanced Credential must have been completed after June 2005.
  • Be accepted by the College Board to read exams and participate in at least one AP Exam Reading
  • Be accepted by the College Board to offer institutes and workshops and deliver at least one course-specific institute or workshop
  • Successfully serve as a mentor to a novice AP teacher
  • Successfully complete at least three semester hours of coursework directly related to the AP course for which licensure is sought
An applicant for renewal of an Advanced Placement Credential must submit evidence of successful completion of the requirements for initial endorsement The requirements for renewal must have been met subsequent to the renewal of the license being renewed and within five years of the date of application.

Statute establishes the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center within the West Virginia Center for Professional Development to provide statewide coordination for the continued growth and development of AP programs in the state. The teacher training functions of the center include:
  • Coordinating AP teacher training institutes
  • Establishing a cadre of instructors for the AP teacher training institutes
  • Providing follow-up teacher training for AP teachers
  • Identifying and obtaining external sources of funding
  • Networking AP teachers through an AP newsletter
  • Serving as a liaison for the College Board and the department of education, county boards of education, institutions of higher education, the West Virginia Advanced Placement Leadership Team, the legislature, and the governor.
Statute directs the state board to establish a program coordinated through the colleges and universities or some other entity to provide training to AP teachers. Statute also calls for an appropriation to assist in the implementation of teacher training for honors and AP instruction. Teachers must be selected to teach honors and advanced placement courses based on their qualifications and academic interests and the needs of the students. County boards of education must, if necessary, make arrangements for the teachers to attend a training program
State subsidies for testing fees No. Students who qualify for a fee reduction will pay $15 in spring 2016 after federal and College Board grants are applied.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems Yes. One of the charges of the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center, housed within the West Virginia Center for Professional Development, is to serve as a liaison for the College Board and the department of education, county boards of education, institutions of higher education, the West Virginia Advanced Placement Leadership Team, the legislature, and the governor.
State support for encouraging access to AP In addition to teacher training, the duties of the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center, housed within the West Virginia Center for Professional Development, include assisting county boards of education and local schools in establishing, evaluating, and maintaining AP programs, and serving as a clearinghouse for AP materials and correspondence.

In addition, the West Virginia Virtual School offers AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores Yes. Students earning ≥ 3 on an AP exam will receive credit at any public 2- or 4-year institution. The Higher Education Policy Commission maintains a list of all AP exams and the minimum number of credits each institution will grant. However, a department may require a higher score than 3 on an AP test if the credit is to be used toward meeting a course requirement for a major in the department. 
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No
Unique characteristics In addition to functions related to AP teacher training, the duties of the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center, housed within the West Virginia Center for Professional Development, include: 
  • Serving as a liaison for the College Board and the department of education, county boards of education, institutions of higher education, the West Virginia Advanced Placement Leadership Team, the legislature, and the governor
  • Conducting research and evaluating the state's AP program
  • Certifying individual courses that meet the established standards of AP programs.
The Higher Education Policy Commission, the University System Board of Trustees, the State College System Board of Directors, and the Council for Community and Technical College Education encourage high school students to participate in the AP program.

Advanced Placement and honors curricula are intended in a subject area for which students have attained at least two of the following three criteria: (1) Demonstrated exceptional ability and interest through past performance, (2) obtained the prerequisite knowledge and skills to perform honors or advanced placement work, and (3) recommended by the student's former or present teachers.

State board regulation regarding student personalized education plans provides, "Best practices encourage students to take at least 1 AP and/or [Advanced Career] course with corresponding examination..."

A certificate of proficiency must include the program of study major completed by the student only for those students who have completed the required major courses, or higher level courses, advanced placement courses, college courses or other more rigorous substitutes related to the major, and the recommended electives.

Wisconsin
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting Yes, for reporting. School and district accountability reports must include percentage of students participating in AP courses.
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees While not state support, districts are required to cover test fees of low-income students. After the College Board's $30 fee reduction and school foregoes its $9 rebate, districts pay $53 per exam for low-income students.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. The Distance Education Grant (DEG) program is intended to to assist eligible distance education program providers with developing distance education course(s) available from the  Wyoming Switchboard Network (WSN). The priority of the DEG Program must be available for the development and maintenance of distance education programs that deliver several types of courses, including AP courses. The DEG Program must also be made available for evaluation of AP courses. 

In addition, the Wisconsin Virtual School is a partner in the Wisconsin Digital Learning Collaborative, a partnership between DPI, Wisconsin Virtual School (WVS), and eSchool Network, Inc. (WEN). WVS partners with school districts throughout the state, to offer online courses, including AP courses.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No. University of Wisconsin Board of Regents policy requires all UW System institutions to award credit for AP scores of ≥ 3. Each institution determines whether course equivalent credit or credit in the major should be granted and the AP score required to grant credit for those purposes. However, the Wisconsin Technical College System does not have a systemwide policy, although all 16 colleges will accept a 3, minimally, for most courses.
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

Wyoming
Advanced Placement 2016
All high schools/districts required to offer AP No
State financial support for AP course offerings/AP success No
AP participation/success included in high school accountability metrics/reporting No
State programs and funding for teacher training No
State subsidies for testing fees No. Many districts offer AP test fee reimbursements, but these are not administered by the state.
State scholarship criteria include AP scores No
Collaboration on AP between K-12 and higher education systems No
State support for encouraging access to AP Yes. AP courses are offered by providers through the Wyoming Switchboard Network (WSN), a collection of approved distance education programs and courses managed by the Wyoming Department of Education. Wyoming Virtual Academy offers single AP courses to students statewide for a fee paid by the student's school district. Additionally, both Wyoming Connections Academy and Wyoming Virtual Academy offer a full variety of AP courses to students enrolled full-time in their programs.
State postsecondary institutions must award credit for minimum scores No
Student must take AP exam to receive course credit No

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