Dual Enrollment - All State Profiles
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Dual Enrollment - All State Profiles

December 2013


Dual enrollment programs — a.k.a. dual credit, concurrent enrollment, postsecondary enrollment options, etc. — allow high school students the opportunity to earn secondary and/or postsecondary credit  before graduating from high school, sometimes at no cost to the student or student's family.

This database provides information on the following policy components:

PROGRAM BASICS

1. Statewide policy in place: Forty-seven states and the District of Columbia have statewide policies governing at least one statewide dual enrollment program. In three states, dual enrollment programs are administered by local district and institution-level policies.

2. Definition or title of program.

3. Where courses provided: Twenty-five states allow students to access courses at either high schools or on postsecondary campuses. In policy or practice, at least 32 states provide online courses through one or more dual enrollment programs. Twelve states have multiple dual enrollment programs in which course location varies by program. Policies in 15 states do not specify where dual enrollment courses through at least one dual enrollment program may be offered. In these states, determinations are jointly made by the high school/school district and postsecondary institution/system. Ten states allow dual enrollment courses to be offered at "other" physical locations than the high school or postsecondary campus. Three states and the District of Columbia permit dual enrollment courses to be offered only on postsecondary campuses.

4. Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned: Twenty-four states specify that dual enrollment students earn both high school and postsecondary credit. One state requires only high school credit to be awarded. Two states require only postsecondary credit to be awarded. In 13 states, the type of credit awarded (high school, postsecondary, or dual credit) varies depending on the state program in which a student is enrolled. Ten states do not specify in state policy whether secondary or postsecondary credit is awarded upon completion of a dual enrollment course. A student may choose whether to apply a course to both types of credit (or only high school or postsecondary credit), or policy is silent (awarding of credit is left to the determination of school districts and/or postsecondary institutions).

5. Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit: Eight states allow high school students to enroll in postsecondary developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit.

6. CTE component: Forty-two states permit high school students to enroll in postsecondary career/technical coursework for high school and/or postsecondary credit.

7. Unique characteristics.

ACCESS

1. Offering mandatory or voluntary: Eight states require all high schools and eligible public postsecondary institutions to provide dual enrollment opportunities. In 29 states, dual enrollment programs are based on voluntary partnerships between K-12 and postsecondary partners, or schools, districts or institutions may limit eligible students from participating. In four states, policy does not specify whether the offering of dual enrollment is mandatory or voluntary. In six states, multiple programs with varying requirements exist. Three states do not have statewide dual enrollment policies--dual enrollment opportunities are offered based on district and postsecondary institution/system policies.

2. College partners can be two-year/four-year/both: Thirty-nine states and the District of Columbia allow two- and four-year postsecondary institutions to accept dual enrollment students. One state allows only two-year public postsecondary institutions to participate in dual enrollment programs. Seven states have multiple programs that vary in the types of institutions that may participation. In three states, state policy does not address the types of institutions that may accept dual enrollment students. Twenty-four states allow nonpublic, proprietary or tribal colleges to participate in dual enrollment programs.

3. Student eligibility requirements:
  • Grade level: Three states require students who meet all other eligibility criteria to be in at least grade 10. Fourteen states require students to be in at least grade 11.
  • Grade point average: Six states include minimum high school grade point average (GPA) as a criterion to be admitted to a dual enrollment program.
  • Written approval/recommendation: In 17 states, written permission or a recommendation from a teacher, principal, other school or district staff member or postsecondary official is an eligibility criterion.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution: Twenty-three states require dual enrollment candidates to meet course prerequisites set by departments or institutions, and/or meet other course placement criteria.
  • "Other":  Twenty-one states require dual enrollment candidates to meet "other" state-set eligibility criteria, i.e., parental permission, completion of certain high school courses or passing scores on state-determined high school or postsecondary assessments, or development of an individual graduation plan for high school coursework.
  • Not specified: In 18 states, some or all eligibility criteria are left to the discretion of local high schools or districts and/or postsecondary institutions. In 9 of these states and the District of Columbia, all eligibility criteria appear to be locally determined.
  • Varies by program: In 11 states, eligibility criteria vary depending upon which dual enrollment opportunity a student is applying for.
4. Cap on number of credits students may earn: Five states cap the number of dual enrollment credits high school students may earn. However, caps vary considerably, from two courses a semester to 30 semester hours per academic year. Eleven states explicitly allow high school students to enroll in college programs as part- or full-time students. In four states, state policy places a cap on the number of postsecondary credits students may earn in one program but sets no cap in the other state program. State policy does not address this issue in 26 states and the District of Columbia. Caps may be set by local agreements or individual postsecondary institutions/systems.

5. Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities: Eighteen states require students and/or parents to be notified of the availability of dual enrollment programs.

6. Counseling/advising is made available to students: Nineteen states specify that prospective or currently dually-enrolled students and parents be provided with counseling about program participation. Twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia do not have statewide policies on this issue. Local agreements or policies may require the provision of counseling.

FINANCE

1. Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition:
In some states where the student or parent is primarily responsible for tuition, state policy provides that a district or higher education institution may fund the tuition costs. The fact that the language in these states says "may" as opposed to "will" means that the primary responsibility of paying tuition is still with the parents or the student, and only the secondary responsibility lies with the district/higher education institution.

2. How state funds participating high schools: Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia provide schools/districts with the same level of funding for dual enrollment students and traditional high school students. Eight states provide equal funding for dual enrollment and traditional high school students, but with qualifications. One state funds districts at a higher level for dually enrolled students. One state provides reduced funding for dual enrollment students as compared to traditional high school students. In 4 states, the level of funding a district receives for a dually enrolled student varies by the program the student is enrolled in. Four states do not specify the funding levels for dual enrollment students in statute or regulations.

3. How state funds participating postsecondary institutions: Thirty-four states and the District of Columbia provide postsecondary institutions with the same level of funding for dual enrollment students and traditional postsecondary students. Five states provide equal funding for dual enrollment and traditional postsecondary students, but with qualifications. One state funds dual enrollment students at a higher level than traditional postsecondary students. No state provides reduced funding for dual enrollment students as compared to traditional postsecondary students. Three states provide different levels of funding, depending on which program a student is participating in. Seven states do not specify the postsecondary funding levels for dual enrollment students in statute or regulations.

ENSURING PROGRAM QUALITY

1. Instructor and course quality component: Thirty-seven states have embedded instructor/course quality components into state policy. Such policies may require high school instructors teaching dual enrollment courses to meet additional criteria, such as supplemental training or appointment as adjunct faculty at the partner postsecondary institution, or require course syllabi or other materials to undergo review by postsecondary faculty, or put other measures in place to ensure the content of dual enrollment courses is equivalent to that of courses taught to traditional postsecondary students. State policy in a few states addresses instructor quality for postsecondary faculty. Eight states and the District of Columbia do not specify instructor/course quality components in state policy. Instructor qualifications and course quality may be set in institutional/system policy, or in agreements between school districts and postsecondary institutions/systems. In 5 states, instructor/course quality is addressed in state policy for one statewide dual enrollment avenue, but not another.

2. Program reporting requirement: Thirty states and the District of Columbia require postsecondary institutions to report on dual enrollment participation. Seventeen states states do not have any such reporting requirements in state policy. Three states have public reporting requirements for one dual enrollment program, but do not have public reporting requirements for another program.

3. Program evaluation component: Twenty-six states require dual enrollment programs to be evaluated. Twenty-four states and the District of Columbia do not have state-level policies requiring dual enrollment programs to undergo evaluation.

TRANSFERABILITY

1. Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits: Twenty-two states require all public two- and four-year institutions to accept college credits earned through dual enrollment programs. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia do not require public postsecondary institutions to accept dual enrollment courses for transfer credit. In two states, public postsecondary institutions must recognize credit earned through one state program, but are not required to recognize credit earned through another state program. Policies in seven states are unclear or silent on this issue.

Note: This database does not include information about Tech Prep or early/middle college high school programs. Information about such programs is included in the ECS career/technical education and early/middle college high school databases.

Methodology: This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

Data compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.

Alabama
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component

Yes. Students at two-year colleges may enroll in academic, career and technical or health courses.

Local boards may elect to participate in the Early College Enrollment Program (ECEP), a dual enrollment program for career and technical education students in grades 11 and 12.

Students who do not have a minimum "B" average but who have demonstrated ability to benefit as documented by successful completion and placement identification on assessments approved by the department of postsecondary education are limited to pursuing career/technical and health-related courses.

Unique characteristics Private school and homeschool students may also establish dual enrollment agreements with postsecondary institutions.

Students in grades 10-12 who do not meet the eligibility requirement of a "B" average in high school courses may be determined eligible to participate in dual enrollment "pending demonstrated ability to benefit as documented by successful completion and placement identification on assessments approved by the department of postsecondary education" (includes ASSET, WorkKeys, CPAT). Such students are limited to pursuing career/technical and health-related courses, and must have "a 'B' average in high school courses related to the occupational/technical studies, if applicable, which the student intends to pursue at the postsecondary level and" have an overall 2.5 grade point average.

The state department of education must work with districts with the lowest high school graduation rates to implement dropout prevention interventions. One of the interventions the department may implement is offering full course fee waivers to students eligible for free/reduced lunch who are enrolled in dual credit courses. The department must submit a written report to the legislature on the outcomes of dropout prevention strategies, and any planned modification of school system dropout prevention strategies and activities, based on the data compiled.

Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. However, standards for school counselors require that prospective school counselors demonstrate knowledge of secondary/postsecondary course articulation and dual enrollment.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, at community colleges. The dual enrollment agreement between the local board and postsecondary institution must address methods for addressing student related issues, including admissions, procedures, and advisement.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent, unless otherwise negotiated between the college and the local board of education. Tuition may be provided by alternative resources, including funds provided by Workforce Development.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined. Determined on institutional basis.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. A high school teacher teaching a dual enrollment course through a community college must be designated an adjunct faculty member of the college and must meet the state board and other accrediting agencies' credentialing requirements. Faculty must be under the college's control and supervision, and the college must provide for faculty orientation, supervision and evaluation.

For courses offered through four-year institutions, instructor and course quality provisions are determined at the institutional level.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Yes, for partnerships between districts and community colleges. Each partnership must include a plan for annual program evaluation. At four-year institutions, addressed on a case-by-case basis.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Alaska
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place No
Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in Alaska, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
Where courses provided Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary No state policy
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Arizona
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs: Dual Enrollment and Concurrent Enrollment. Dual Enrollment courses are offered on a high school campus through an agreement or contract between a school district/charter school and a community college district governing board. Concurrent Enrollment courses are offered on a college campus. Policies in this profile generally relate to dual enrollment.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dependent on where courses accessed. Secondary and postsecondary credit awarded for community college courses offered at a high school. Postsecondary credit awarded for community college or university courses offered on the postsecondary campus.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No. A dual enrollment course is defined as a course applicable to a community college academic degree or certificate program.

CTE component Yes. High school students who enroll in vocational courses on a community college campus may be admitted on an individual basis with the approval of college officials if the student meets course requirements and college officials determine admission is in the student's best interest.
Unique characteristics Home schooled students enrolling in a course on the community college campus are exempt from student eligibility criteria related to scores on ACT, SAT, PSAT, AIMS or college placement tests.

A school district must ensure a student is a full-time student attending a full-time instructional program at a school in the district before the student may enroll in a community college course offered at a high school during the school day. An exception is provided for seniors who satisfy graduation requirements and who have less than a full-time instructional program.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory. However, offering of community college courses in high schools is on the determination of a community college governing board that it is in the best interest of citizens of the community college district.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12. Only applies for courses offered at high schools. Other provisions specify that a student may not be denied admission to a community college or university due to age or grade in school if a student as achieved at least a specified score on a college entrance exam. A community college offering a course at a high school may waive the grade level requirement for up to 25% of students, provided that the college has written criteria for waiving requirements for each course. Criteria must include that 9th and 10th graders meet course prerequisites and are prepared to benefit from the course.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Admission must be granted to a community college to a student under 18 who meets course prerequisites
  • Other. Student must achieve one of the following: (1) Composite score of at least 93 on PSAT; (2) Composite score of at least 930 on SAT; (3) Composite score of at least 22 on ACT; (4) Passing score on relevant portions of the Arizona instrument to measure standards test; or (5) Completion of a college placement test designated by the community college district that indicates the student is at the appropriate college level for the course.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, a community college or university enrolling a student on the postsecondary campus may limit the number of semester hours in which a student may enroll to no less than 6 credit hours.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Each community college district and the Arizona Board of Regents must provide all high schools with information that describes the policies and rules, types of courses available and other information related to the enrollment of students under age 18. Districts must make this information available to all high school students.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition All courses: Local decision. Specifically:

For courses offered at postsecondary campuses: Unless the student's high school or postsecondary institution has volunteered to pay the tuition, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.

For community college courses offered at high schools, the agreement or contract between the school district/charter school and community college district must specify student tuition and financial aid policies, including if scholarships or grants are awarded to dual enrollment students.
How state funds participating high schools Equal. For community college districts offering courses in high schools, the agreement or contract between the community college district and the school district or chartering organization must identify the amount received in full-time student equivalent funding, the portion of funding distributed to the district board or charter school, and any amount subsequently returned to the community college district by the school district or charter school.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, for courses taught by postsecondary faculty. For community college courses taught by high school faculty on the high school campus, the amount of state aid that the community college would otherwise receive for that student is reduced by 50%.

For community college districts offering courses in high schools, the agreement or contract between the community college district and the school district or chartering organization must identify the amount received in full-time student equivalent funding, the portion of funding distributed to the district board or charter school, and any amount subsequently returned to the community college district by the school district or charter school.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. An agreement or contract between a community college district and a school district or charter school must clearly specify the quality of the instruction that will be provided. Courses must be previously evaluated and approved through the community college district's curriculum approval process, be at a higher level than taught by the high school, and be transferable to a university or applicable to an established community college occupational degree or certificate program. College approved textbooks, syllabuses, course outlines and grading standards applicable to courses if taught at the community college must apply to these courses. The CEO of each community college must establish an advisory committee of full-time faculty to assist in course selection and implementation in the high schools, and to review and report at least annually to the CEO whether the course goals and standards are understood, course guidelines are followed, and same standards of expectation and assessment are applied to courses as though they were offered at the community college. The advisory committee must meet at least three times each academic year.
Each faculty member must meet requirements established by the governing board. The CEO of each community college district must establish an advisory committee of full-time faculty to assist in the selection, orientation, ongoing professional development and evaluation of faculty teaching college courses in conjunction with high schools. The advisory committee must meet at least twice each academic year.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The board of regents must annually submit a report to legislative leaders and the state board on students who have not earned a high school diploma enrolled in a university course for university credit. The report must include (1) The number of students enrolled; (2) A general narrative on the types of courses or programs in which students were enrolled; (3) Rules on the admission of students who do not have a high school diploma.

Each community college district must report in each odd-numbered year to the governor, legislative leadership, and the joint legislative budget committee, for courses offered at high schools: (1) Documentation of compliance with 15-1821.01 (3), (4), (5), including a list of faculty advisory committee members at each community college; (2) Total enrollments by location, high school grade level, and course; (3) A copy of each addendum to intergovernmental agreements or contracts executed pursuant to statute; (4) Summary data by community college district and by college on the number of scholarships or grants awarded to students; (5) Such other information as the governor and joint legislative budget committee deem proper.
Program evaluation component No
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes

Arkansas
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has three programs: An endorsed concurrent enrollment course is a course in math, English, science, and social studies offered at the high school (or in rare instances on the college campus), that meets specified quality components, and upon completion of which a student earns high school and postsecondary credit.

Dual enrollment is a high school student’s enrollment in postsecondary coursework for college credit only.

Statute also permits (1) a public school student who has completed 8th grade to enroll in a publicly supported community college or four-year college or university and receive postsecondary and high school graduation credit upon course completion and (2) qualified public or private high school students to, upon request, be accepted for enrollment in a public institution of higher education as part-time students.
Where courses provided Not specified. Concurrent courses are offered for high school students during the school day on the high school campus, the college campus, or by distance technology.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned For both programs: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes, but only for courses offered through enrollment of students who have completed the 8th grade. A student must be a 12th grader with an ACT sub-score of at least 17 in English, reading or math (or an equivalent measure). An institution offering a remedial/developmental education course must inform the student, verbally and in writing, that successful completion of such coursework at one college or university does not guarantee college course placement at another Arkansas institution, unless there is a written/signed college course placement agreement with the other institution. A list of the institutions of higher education with a signed college course placement agreement must be 1) included in the signed Memorandum of Agreement between the school district and college/university, 2) published in the current college/university catalog, and 3) posted on the college/university website.

A remedial/developmental education course cannot be used to meet the core subject area/unit requirements in English and math for high school graduation.

Public school students in grade 12 who are enrolled in remedial/developmental education courses are not counted for public higher education funding purposes.
CTE component Yes. Concurrent credit classes may be offered for high school career and technical credit in a secondary area technical center, once they have undergone approval and alignment by the Arkansas Department of Career Education.
Unique characteristics Private and home school students may also participate.

Institutions of higher education may collaborate to provide a concurrent enrollment course and award course credit.

The institution providing the course must provide students with the opportunity to utilize the on-campus library or other academic resources of the institution. 

Because discrete classes that totally separate concurrent credit students from non-concurrent credit students may be prohibitive to operate in some cases, those classes with a mixed population must have at least a majority of the students enrolled for concurrent credit. All high school students enrolled in the concurrent course must meet the same requirements for completion of the course whether or not the student is registered for college credit.

2013 legislation creates a Council on Postsecondary Education and Career Readiness, which must, among other duties, support college and career readiness standards that promote accelerated learning opportunities, including without Advanced Placement courses, concurrent credit opportunities, and other accelerated opportunities with college or vocational-technical school assistance.

Any public school, education service cooperative, or institution of higher education is authorized to enter into one or more interlocal agreements to collaborate to improve public school performance and academic achievement. An interlocal agreement establishes an “education renewal zone.” An education renewal zone strategic plan must provide for enhancement and expansion of school curricular offerings via two-way interactive television, including advanced placement, dual-credit, and advanced high school courses.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary

Voluntary

College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both For both programs: Both. For enrollment of students who have completed the 8th grade (non-“endorsed concurrent enrollment course”), accredited private institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From high school principal or designee.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. For endorsed concurrent enrollment: Students must be admitted by the institution of higher education as a non-degree or non-certificate seeking student, and meet all course prerequisites.
  • Other. Students must also score 19 or better on the ACT Reading sub-test or have a score on the EXPLORE, PLAN or PSAT assessments that are projected to produce a 19 or better on the ACT Reading sub-test, or comparable score on the SAT, ASSET or COMPASS, to enroll in any general education course. Enrollment in English Composition and math courses also require a 19 or better on the respective ACT sub-test or a score on the EXPLORE, PLAN or PSAT assessments that are projected to produce a 19 or better on the respective ACT sub-tests or comparable score on the SAT, COMPASS or ASSET. These scores are statewide minimum scores. Any college/university campus may set higher minimum scores for general education concurrent courses, and may choose to require the COMPASS or ASSET score in addition to EXPLORE, PLAN or PSAT scores.

For enrollment of students who have completed the 8th grade (non-“endorsed concurrent enrollment course”): If the institution requires an ACT score greater than 19 or the equivalent, the student must meet that institution's concurrent admissions and course placement requirements. If a student is a 12th grader has an ACT sub-score of at least 17 in English, reading or mathematics (or an equivalent measure) may enroll in remedial/developmental education courses in English, reading and mathematics.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. For endorsed concurrent enrollment: students may participate only in English, math, science and social studies courses.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for endorsed concurrent enrollment courses. The institution offering the course must provide academic guidance counseling, and ensure students have the opportunity to utilize institutional resources, including academic advising on the college/university campus. Institutions may collaborate to meet this requirement.

Concurrent enrollment students must be informed that the student is responsible for all costs associated with enrollment in the concurrent course, unless the courses are paid by another approved public or private entity; and 2) advised about the potential limitations concerning the transfer of college course credit.

If remedial/developmental education courses in English, reading or mathematics are offered for concurrent credit to high school seniors, a list of the colleges/universities with a signed college course placement agreement must be published in the student guide/information sheet, and posted on the college/university website.

The college/university must provide the school district with a student guide or information sheet for concurrent enrollment that the high school must distribute to students and parents, that outlines the college/university and school district requirements for student participation. The high school will assure that the student and parent acknowledge that the student will participate in the concurrent program in accordance with the stated college/university and school district participation requirements.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Tuition is paid by the student/parent unless paid by a school district, college scholarship, grant, or private foundation.

Endorsed Concurrent Enrollment: A state-supported two-year or four-year institution of higher education may offer a reduced tuition rate. The reduction in tuition is considered an institutional scholarship.

Enrollment of students who have completed the 8th grade: The student is responsible for all course costs, unless these are paid by the public school district, a college/university scholarship, a grant, or a private foundation. If the course costs are paid by the school district, a college/university scholarship, a grant, or a private foundation, a signed agreement must exist between the school district, the external entity or foundation, and the publicly-supported or private institution of higher education.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, for courses offered through enrollment of students who have completed the 8th grade and endorsed concurrent enrollment.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, for credit-bearing courses. Public school students in grade 12 who are enrolled in remedial/developmental education courses are not counted for public higher education funding purposes.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Instructors of endorsed concurrent enrollment courses must have at least a master's degree that includes a minimum of 18 graduate hours of coursework in the subject area of the course. The instructor's credentials must be approved by the academic unit or chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution offering the course. The instructor must also have the relevant credentials and experience necessary to teach from the syllabus approved by the postsecondary institution. For the purpose of teaching a concurrent course under this policy, an individual under contract with the school district as a teacher will not be considered an adjunct faculty member of the college/university.

Concurrent enrollment courses must be approved through the postsecondary institution's normal process and listed in the postsecondary institution's catalog. The course content and instruction must meet the same standards and adopt the same learning outcomes and assignments as those developed for a course taught on the institution’s campus, including the administration of any departmental exams applicable to the course, use of substantially the same book and syllabus as used at the college level, and the same course grading standards. If departmental exams are used in college/university campus courses, then those course exams must be used at the high school site. The institution must provide the course instructor with staff development, supervision, and evaluation. Institutions may collaborate to provide this staff development, supervision, and evaluation.

Institutions of higher education must demonstrate “ownership” of any course offered for concurrent credit for which students are reported for funding purposes. Ownership of courses means that the college/university must (1) provide the instructors with appropriate training and orientation in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and administrative requirements after approval of the instructors to teach the college/university courses; and (2) ensure that instructors receive continuing collegial interaction with college faculty through professional development, required seminars, and site visits. These interactions must address topics such as course content, course delivery, student learning assessment, in-class evaluation, and professional development in the field of study.

Concurrent program requirements and guidelines required for course instruction must be provided by the college/university to the school district and concurrent instructors.

Any college or university that participates in a concurrent enrollment program must be accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships or be authorized by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board no later than August 1, 2015. An institution offering concurrent enrollment only on the college/university campus has satisfied the requirements for initial authorization for Concurrent Enrollment Program participation.

Postsecondary faculty who travel to the high school or secondary center to teach concurrent courses (and/or faculty and staff who have direct contact with the high school student) must have a criminal background check and complete the child maltreatment training course as required of public school teachers.

For a CTE course offered in a secondary area technical center: Technical instructors teaching at a secondary area technical center must have a minimum of an associate degree within the area of instruction and must have completed fingerprint and background checks and meet all college accrediting standards for instructors. Secondary area technical centers should submit documentation of these records to the Office of Workforce Training, ADWE. Centers will annually submit a list of instructors providing concurrent credit and meeting the above requirements will be given an annual waiver from teacher licensure requirements. Those instructors not meeting these requirements or instructors teaching non-concurrent credit classes must hold an Arkansas teacher permit.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Colleges/universities must report concurrent enrollments through the Arkansas Student Information System. In addition, department of higher education staff must submit an annual report on concurrent course enrollment to the coordinating board, to include institutional data on concurrent course offerings and locations.
Program evaluation component Yes. The annual report on concurrent course enrollment may include ADHE Executive Staff Recommendations for policy amendments on the administration, continuance, and funding of the concurrent enrollment program.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes, provided the course is an endorsed concurrent enrollment course and is listed as a “comparable” course in the Arkansas Department of Higher Education’s Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS). By definition, an “endorsed concurrent enrollment course” must be listed in ACTS. If the college/university offers the course at the freshman or sophomore level, the course is listed as a comparable course in ACTS.

California
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. The governing board of a community college district may admit to any community college under its jurisdiction a student eligible to attend community college as a special part-time or full-time student under Section 48800 or 48800.5. An 11th or 12th grader may also be enrolled part time in classes of the California State University or University of California for academic credit.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. Credit for courses completed is at the level determined to be appropriate by the school district and community college district governing boards.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy. However, while not strictly a dual credit course, a principal may recommend a student for a community college summer session course that is necessary to assist a pupil who has not passed the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) and that does not offer college credit in English language arts or math, provided the student is a high school senior and has completed all other graduation requirements prior to the end of his/her senior year, or will complete all remaining graduation requirements during a community college summer session, which he/she is recommended to enroll in, following his/her senior year of high school.
CTE component Yes. A student may participate in a college-level, occupational course for credit assigned a priority code of “A,” “B,” or “C,” pursuant to the Student Accountability Model, as defined by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges and reported in the management information system, and the course is part of a sequence of vocational or career technical education courses leading to a degree or certificate in the subject area covered by the sequence.

Statute directs the chancellor of the California Community Colleges and the superintendent of public instruction to assist economic and workforce regional development centers and consortia, community colleges, middle schools, high schools, and regional occupational centers and programs to improve linkages and career technical education pathways between high schools and community colleges. As part of these efforts, a community college district may enroll a high school student who is not a resident of that community college district in a program implemented towards these ends. The district is not subject to any other geographic limitations if the program is designed to serve high school pupils and/or involves multiple school districts or community college districts, and the program is not offered at the pupil's high school.

Each district participating in the Linked Learning Pilot Program must adopt policies and agreements that promote concurrent enrollment and dual credit with community colleges and universities.
Unique characteristics If a community college governing board denies a request for a special part-time or full-time enrollment for a pupil identified as highly gifted, the board must record its findings and the reasons for denial of the request in writing within 60 days. The written recommendation and denial must be issued at the next regularly scheduled board meeting that falls at least 30 days after the request has been submitted.

A community college district governing board must assign a low enrollment priority to special part-time or full-time students in order to ensure that these students do not displace regularly admitted students.

The parent of a student not enrolled in a public school may directly petition the president of any community college to authorize the pupil’s attendance at the community college as a special part-time or full-time student on the ground that the pupil would benefit from advanced scholastic or vocational work that would thereby be available.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, a parent may petition a district governing board to authorize a student’s attendance as a special full-time student at a community college. A parent may file an appeal to a petition with the county board of education.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From school principal—for community college and CSU admission as special student.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. A CSU campus may admit a high school student if the appropriate campus authority judges the student's preparation and ability such that the probability of the student's academic success at the campus is equivalent to that of traditionally admitted first-time freshmen.
  • Not specified. A community college governing board may restrict admission/enrollment of a special part- or full-time student based on age, grade level, or demonstrated eligibility for instruction using assessment methods and procedures, pursuant to regulations adopted by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.
  • Other. Parental permission, for special student at community college.
A parent of a student, regardless of the student’s grade level, may petition a district governing board to authorize the child’s attendance as a special full-time student at a community college. A parent may file an appeal with the county board of education.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student at a community college. However, if a student is enrolled as a part-time student, the student may enroll in no more than 11 units per semester.

In addition, a principal may not recommend for community college summer session attendance more than 5% of the total number of pupils who have just completed that grade. Exceptions provided for courses in the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum or California State University general education requirements, certain occupational courses, and non-college-credit-bearing courses for high school seniors who have not passed the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE).
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent. A community college district may exempt special part-time students from fee requirements, but is not required to do so.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A school district may count a student as full-time for funding purposes if the student attends school at least three hours a day and is either enrolled at a community college as a special part-time student, or is an 11th or 12th grader enrolled part-time in classes of the California State University or University of California for academic credit. However, a district board may allow a student to attend school for less than the minimum school day if the board finds this to be in the student’s best interests.

A student enrolled as a special full-time student at a community college is exempt from compulsory school attendance requirements and as such, would not generate revenue for the school district.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. A community college may include high school students in the district’s report of full-time equivalent students only if the class is open to the general public, and is advertised as such in the college catalog, and/or the regular schedule of classes, and/or an addendum to the college catalog or regular schedule of classes. An exception is provided for a class offered at a high school after the regular schedule of classes is published.

Dual enrollment students funded at a higher level for special full-time students at a community college. A college is credited with additional units of average daily attendance for these students.

A community college district may not receive state apportionments for special part-time and full-time students enrolled in physical education courses in excess of 5% of the district's total reported full-time equivalent enrollment of special part-time and full-time students.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Yes. The Chancellor of the California Community Colleges must annually submit to the department of finance and the legislature a report on the amount of FTEs claimed by each community college district for special part- time and special full-time students for the preceding academic year in the following class categories:
  • Noncredit
  • Nondegree-applicable
  • Degree-applicable, excluding physical education
  • Degree-applicable physical education.
The report must also indicate the number of high school students who enroll in community college summer courses and receive a passing grade.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear

Colorado
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Colorado has two programs: Concurrent Enrollment allows students in grades 9-12 to enroll in postsecondary coursework. The ASCENT (accelerating students through concurrent enrollment) or “5th year” program allows students who do not need postsecondary remediation and who have completed or are on schedule to complete at least 12 hours of postsecondary coursework prior to the end of 12th grade to concurrently enroll in postsecondary courses in the year after the student was enrolled in 12th grade. An ASCENT participant is not considered a high school graduate until completing participation in the ASCENT program and any remaining graduation requirements.

Unless otherwise indicated, all provisions in this profile refer to concurrent enrollment.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes
CTE component Yes. Concurrent enrollment students may enroll in postsecondary CTE courses. However, a student may not concurrently enroll in a course offered by a postsecondary career and technical education program unless the course is included in a postsecondary degree or certificate program approved by the state board for community colleges and occupational education. The instructor of such a course must possess a career and technical education teaching credential that has been authorized by the state board for community colleges and occupational education.
Unique characteristics Concurrent Enrollment and ASCENT: A “legislative declaration” makes clear that 2009 policy changes were intended to expand the mission of concurrent enrollment programs to serve a wider range of students, particularly those who represent communities with historically low college participation rates, and enhance program access and quality.

Concurrent Enrollment: In considering applications for a student to concurrently enroll in an institution of higher education, a superintendent, designee, or chief administrator must give priority consideration to qualified students who, by the time they would concurrently enroll, will have completed the high school graduation requirements and are applying for concurrent enrollment to begin earning credits toward a postsecondary degree or certificate or, if required to complete basic skills courses, to complete the courses during the remainder of the 12th-grade year.

A cooperative agreement between a local education provider and an institution of higher education must include consideration and identification of ways in which concurrently enrolled students can remain eligible for interscholastic high school activities.

Each high school student must have an individual career and academic plan. Each plan must include a career planning and guidance component and a portfolio that reflects, among other components, any concurrent enrollment credits earned.

Concurrent enrollment students must register for the College Opportunity Fund (COF) stipend. Participating students must confirm their understanding that with the exception of basic skills credits, credits earned will be deducted from the COF lifetime account (145.0 credit hours) for courses being taken at institutions of higher education that participate in the College Opportunity Fund.

ASCENT: The department of education includes ASCENT program participants in school accountability reporting requirements, regardless of whether an ASCENT program participant has completed his/her graduation requirements.

A 13-member concurrent enrollment advisory board includes representatives of the state systems of K-12 and higher education, gubernatorial representatives, the director of accreditation and regional services in the department of education (or designee), and two representatives of postsecondary career and technical education programs. The board is responsible for (1) establishing guidelines for the administration of the ASCENT program, (2) advising and assisting local education providers and institutions of higher education in preparing cooperative agreements, and (3) making recommendations as necessary to the general assembly, the state board, and the commission concerning the improvement or updating of state policies relating to concurrent enrollment programs, including but not limited to recommendations of policies that will allow every local education provider in the state to have adequate resources to enter into at least one cooperative agreement and recommendations of a funding allocation model. The board must annually report to the state board and the commission on higher education on any guidelines the board has established for administration of the ASCENT program, and any recommendations the board makes to improve or update state policies relating to concurrent enrollment programs.

Pending voter approval of a tax increase for funding P-12 education by November 2017: The department of education must develop a report on return on investment (ROI) to districts and charter schools and a cost study by January 31, 2016 and every four years thereafter. The ROI report must analyze, among other indicators, concurrent enrollment, including participating in the ASCENT program.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Concurrent Enrollment: Voluntary. Student participation subject to approval by district superintendent or designee (or charter school or BOCES administrator), and postsecondary institutions are not required to enter into a cooperative agreement with a local education provider or allow the concurrent enrollment of eligible students. However, each public institution of higher education is strongly encouraged to allow the concurrent enrollment of qualified students. However, each public institution of higher education is strongly encouraged to allow the concurrent enrollment of qualified students.

An institution of higher education may limit the number of qualified students the institution allows to enroll. If an institution of higher education refuses to allow a qualified student to concurrently enroll, the institution must provide a written explanation of its refusal to the student and the student's local education provider.

ASCENT: Voluntary. Student must be selected by his/her principal.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Postsecondary career and technical education programs and accredited private baccalaureate-awarding institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From district superintendent or designee. For charter school or board of cooperative services (BOCES) high school students, approval from the chief administrator of the charter school or BOCES high school.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other: Student must develop an academic plan of study describing all the courses the student intends to complete to satisfy his/her remaining graduation requirements. Before the student’s concurrent enrollment, the principal, a counselor, or a teacher advisor must approve the academic plan of study. For ASCENT program, a student must be selected by his/her principal, and designated by the department of education. An eligible student must be under age 21, have completed or be on schedule to complete at least 12 postsecondary credit hours before the end of 12th grade, not be in need of a basic skills course, be accepted into a postsecondary degree program at an institution of higher education, and meet any other selection criteria established by the Concurrent Enrollment Advisory Board.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No. With the exception of limits for fifth-year seniors, the state board may not limit the number of postsecondary courses, including academic courses and career and technical education courses, in which a qualified student may concurrently enroll during grades 9-12.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Each district, board of cooperative services (BOCES), and charter school must annually notify all students and parents of the opportunity for concurrent enrollment by qualified students in postsecondary courses, including academic courses and career and technical education courses.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. The local education provider (school district, charter school, or board of cooperative services (BOCES)) and the institution of higher education must establish an academic program of study for each qualified student who concurrently enrolls in the institution. The academic program of study must include the academic plan of study the student has developed, indicating the courses the student intends to complete to satisfy high school graduation requirements, and a plan by which the local education provider must make ongoing counseling and career planning available to the student. Each local education provider must develop a standard Concurrent Enrollment application form, that must include verification that the student has been advised by the local education provider regarding Concurrent Enrollment participation if available, at the local education provider level, and each course is consistent with the student's Individual Career and Academic Plan (ICAP).

Each public school and charter school must ensure that, in developing and maintaining each student's ICAP, the counselor or teacher explains in writing to the student and parent the requirements for and benefits of concurrently enrolling in courses with an institution of higher education. Based on a request from the student or parent, the counselor or teacher must assist the student in course planning to enable the student to concurrently enroll in postsecondary courses.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local education provider (i.e., school district, charter school, or board of cooperative services (BOCES). A cooperative agreement must establish the tuition rate at which the local education provider pays the institution of higher education for any courses in which a student concurrently enrolls. The tuition rate must not exceed the student share of the tuition rate established for Colorado residents enrolled in the course (or if offered by a four-year institution, the student share of the tuition rate established for Colorado residents enrolled in a general studies course at a community college). However, nothing prohibits an institution of higher education from charging tuition or associated fees to a student or his/her parent or in addition to the tuition paid by the student's local education provider. If the student does not complete the course without the consent of the student’s principal, the student and parent must reimburse the local education provider for tuition paid.
How state funds participating high schools Both programs: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. The postsecondary institution is responsible for course content, placement of the student in the course, and the quality of instruction.

A postsecondary instructor may not be required to hold a teacher’s license.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The department of education and department of higher education must annually report to the education committees of the senate and house of representatives on concurrent enrollment students. The report must include (for the previous school year):
  • The number and names of local education providers and institutions of higher education that have entered into cooperative agreements
  • The number of students who participated in a concurrent enrollment program, including subtotals for each local education provider and each institution of higher education
  • Demographic information about students who participated in a concurrent enrollment program
  • The total number of credit hours completed at each institution of higher education by concurrent enrollment program students
  • The total number of basic skills courses completed at each institution of higher education in by concurrent enrollment students
  • The total tuition costs paid by local education providers to institutions of higher education in on behalf of concurrent enrollment program students, including subtotals for each local education provider and each institution of higher education
  • The total number of students designated by the department as ASCENT program participants
  • The postsecondary degree and certificate programs in which ASCENT program participants were concurrently enrolled, including subtotals indicating how many ASCENT program participants concurrently enrolled in each postsecondary degree and certificate program
  • Data indicating the total number and percentages of qualified students who failed to complete at least one course in which they concurrently enrolled
  • To the extent possible, data indicating the total number and percentage of students who concurrently enrolled in college courses who have completed a postsecondary degree.
These reports may include quantitative and qualitative analyses concerning student and administrator attitudes and behaviors, program costs and productivity, academic and administrative policies, program availability and variety, or any objectives of the ASCENT program, which studies may be prepared by a party other than the department or the department of higher education.

The institution of higher education must use the student’s unique student identifier.
In addition, school performance reports (public school accountability reports) must indicate concurrent enrollment courses made available by the school online or on the school campus.
Program evaluation component Yes. Statute creates a concurrent enrollment advisory board tasked with making recommendations to the general assembly, the state board, and the commission concerning the improvement or updating of state policies relating to concurrent enrollment programs, including policy recommendations that would allow every local education provider in the state to have adequate resources to enter into at least one cooperative agreement. The board must annually submit a report to the state board and the commission on higher education that includes guidelines for the administration of the ASCENT program and board recommendations for state policy changes.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes, provided a course is a gtPathways (Guaranteed Transfer) course. Students who successfully complete a state guaranteed general education course will receive transfer credits applied to graduation requirements in all majors at all public institutions unless a specific statewide articulation agreement exists. More than 500 lower-division general education courses in 20 subject areas are approved for guaranteed transfer.

Connecticut
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. Students may apply a course completed at an accredited public or private institution (or online course offered by such institutions, if the local or regional board of education has adopted a policy on awarding of credit for online coursework) toward completion of high school graduation requirements.

Career technical students enrolled in the department of labor apprenticeship program may earn college credit (not secondary credit).
Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. The board of trustees for the community/technical colleges must establish procedures for the development of articulation agreements between technical high schools and regional community-technical colleges, and for the awarding of college credit for persons enrolled in and registered under the terms of a certified apprenticeship training program registered with the Connecticut State Apprenticeship Council.
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited non-profit and for-profit colleges, universities, and occupational schools are also eligible to participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A student must be enrolled in coursework at the high school for at least five hours a day.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for online courses. Students may apply postsecondary online courses toward high school graduation requirements if the local or regional board of education has adopted a policy on awarding of graduation credit for online coursework. Local policies must ensure that, if a course is offered by an accredited postsecondary institution, (1) the workload required by the online course is equivalent to that of a similar course taught in a traditional classroom setting, (2) the content is rigorous and aligned with state board-approved curriculum guidelines, where appropriate, (3) the course engages students and has interactive components, including required interactions between students and their teachers, participation in on-line demonstrations, discussion boards or virtual labs, and (4) the program of instruction is planned, ongoing and systematic.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Delaware
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment. “Dual Credit” refers to the awarding of both high school and postsecondary credit.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Students must have multiple points of access for dual credit and dual enrollment course(s) including, but not limited to, course(s) offered on the high school campus, course(s) offered on the postsecondary institution campus, course(s) offered online, or a combination of the above.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. Tech Prep courses are included in the definition of dual credit courses. For Tech Prep courses, the postsecondary institution must ensure the student's attainment of competencies as outlined in the articulation agreement between the high school and institution.
Unique characteristics No student may be denied access to dual enrollment courses because of the student's or family's inability to pay.

Dual enrollment and dual credit must be included in the Student Success Plan (SSP), for students electing to participate in dual enrollment.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Regionally accredited private institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified. The articulation agreement between the district, school, or charter school and the institution must specify student eligibility and participation requirements. Student eligibility and participation requirements must be based on multiple indicators of readiness such as, but not limited, to a combination of tests, course grades, teacher recommendations or portfolios.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All students must be provided information about dual enrollment and dual credit opportunities.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy. However, counselors should include dual enrollment courses planned/taken in the Student Success Plan that is reviewed annually.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Payment of tuition varies depending upon the type of dual enrollment and district policy -- may be grant-funded, paid by the student or student's parent, or covered by waivers for eligible students.

Funding sources such as grants must be identified, as well as the procedures for applying and the procedures for the awarding of such funds or waivers. No student may be denied access to dual credit or dual enrollment courses because of the student's or family's inability to pay.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. The articulation agreement between the district, school, or charter school and institution must specify the course syllabus, the expected course competencies, grading policy, attendance policy, and conditions for awarding dual credit. All dual credit courses must be taught by an approved Dual Credit Instructor. A dual enrollment instructor must meet the requirements of a faculty member or adjunct faculty member at the institution.

All dual credit courses must incorporate any applicable state content standards.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

District of Columbia
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy

CTE component Not set in state policy

Unique characteristics An LEA that implements a dual enrollment program must notify parents that postsecondary institution employees are not subject to the criminal background checks that are applicable to elementary and secondary school employees.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. To implement a dual enrollment program for its students, an LEA must develop a Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement with a partnering postsecondary institution. No language in a Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement may require partnering postsecondary institutions to admit dual enrollment students from an LEA.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited not-for-profit private institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified. Determined in the Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement an LEA develops with a partnering postsecondary institution.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy. However, a Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement between an LEA and a partnering postsecondary institution must specify what student support mechanisms, if any, will be made available.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. LEAs and postsecondary institutions agree in the Partnership Agreement on who will be responsible for tuition in the Partnership Agreement.  Currently for most programs, tuition is primarily paid by the postsecondary institutions.  In cases where it is not, tuition is paid from the District of Columbia dual enrollment fund, which is administered by the State Superintendent for Education’s office.  A Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement must provide that students will not be charged tuition for dual enrollment courses.
How state funds participating high schools Equal

How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal. Postsecondary institutions are funded based on actual student costs.  The state Dual Enrollment Fund will pay unmet tuition, fees, and books for participating dual enrollment students upon receiving an invoice from an eligible postsecondary institution.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Yes. An LEA must annually submit to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) a copy of each Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement. An LEA operating a dual enrollment program must report data to OSSE on student participation, course enrollment, and credits earned in the dual enrollment program for use in the longitudinal educational data warehouse.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Florida
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy. The department of education must approve any course for inclusion in the dual enrollment program that is contained within the statewide course numbering system. A developmental education course must be evaluated individually for potential inclusion in the dual enrollment program.
CTE component Yes. Dual enrollment is defined as the enrollment of an eligible secondary student or home education student in a postsecondary course creditable toward high school completion and either a career certificate or other postsecondary options. Career dual enrollment must be provided as an option for secondary students to earn industry certifications, and must be available for secondary students seeking a degree and industry certification through a career education program or course. Home study students must have the opportunity to participate in career dual enrollment, among other dual enrollment options.

Each district board must develop, in collaboration with regional workforce boards, economic development agencies, and postsecondary institutions approved to operate in the state, a strategic 3-year plan to address and meet local and regional workforce demands. Each strategic 3-year plan must be constructed and based on, among other components, opportunities for high school students to earn weighted or dual enrollment credit for higher-level career and technical courses.

A student dually enrolled in a workforce education program operated by a Florida College System institution or school district career center generates the amount calculated for workforce education funding, including any payment of performance funding, and the proportional share of full-time equivalent enrollment generated through the Florida Education Finance Program for the student's enrollment in a high school. If a student is dually enrolled in a Florida College System institution program, including a program at a high school, the Florida College System institution earns the funds generated for workforce education funding, and the school district earns the proportional share of full-time equivalent funding from the Florida Education Finance Program. If a student is dually enrolled in a career center operated by the same district as the district in which the student attends high school, that district earns the funds generated for workforce education funding and also earns the proportional share of full-time equivalent funding from the Florida Education Finance Program. If a student is dually enrolled in a workforce education program provided by a career center operated by a different school district, the funds must be divided between the two school districts proportionally from the two funding sources. A student may not be reported for funding in a dual enrollment workforce education program unless the student has completed the basic skills assessment.

One of the goals of a career and professional academy and career-themed courses, as set forth in statute, is to promote acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enrollment or articulated credit, so that students may earn postsecondary credit while in high school.
Unique characteristics Private school and home schooled students may also participate. A postsecondary institution must enter into a home education articulation agreement with each home education student, which must include the initial and continued eligibility requirements for home education students, not to exceed those required of other dually enrolled students. A home education student is responsible for his/her own instructional materials and transportation unless provided for otherwise.

The department of education must develop an electronic submission system for dual enrollment articulation agreements and must review for compliance each dual enrollment articulation agreement annually submitted by the Florida College System institution to the department of education. The commissioner of education must notify the district school superintendent and the Florida College System institution president if the dual enrollment articulation agreement does not comply with statutory requirements and shall submit any dual enrollment articulation agreement with unresolved issues of noncompliance to the State Board of Education.

The state board of education must establish a process for the continual and uninterrupted review of newly proposed core secondary courses and existing courses requested to be considered as core courses to ensure that sufficient rigor and relevance is provided for workforce skills and postsecondary education and aligned to state curriculum standards. A curriculum review committee whose membership is approved by Workforce Florida, Inc. is responsible for reviewing newly proposed core secondary courses. Approved core courses must also be reviewed and considered for approval for dual enrollment credit.

The commissioner of education may approve dual enrollment agreements for limited course offerings that have statewide appeal. Such programs shall be limited to a single site with multiple county participation.

Each district must develop a comprehensive plan for student progression which must list, or incorporate by reference, all dual enrollment courses contained within the dual enrollment articulation agreement.

“Providing dual enrollment instruction” is articulated in statute as part of the mission and responsibility of Florida College System institutions.

Dependent children of active duty military personnel who otherwise meet the eligibility criteria for special academic programs, including dual enrollment, offered through public schools must be given first preference for admission to such programs even if the program is being offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned. If such a program is offered through a public school other than the school to which the student would generally be assigned, the student’s parent must assume responsibility for student transportation.

To earn a “scholar designation” on the standard high school diploma, a student must, among other criteria, earn at least 1 credit in an Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Advanced International Certificate of Education, or dual enrollment course.

Effective with the Class of 2015, all students must complete at least one graduation credit via an online course. This requirement may be met through an online dual enrollment course.

District school boards must consider, but are not limited to, implementing specified approaches to meet constitutional class size maximums, including adopting policies to encourage qualified students to take dual enrollment courses.

Dual enrollment students have access to state funded electronic library resources that are licensed for Florida College System institutions and state universities by the Florida Virtual Campus.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory. Each district school superintendent and Florida College System institution president must develop a comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement for the respective school district and Florida College System institution.

District school boards may not refuse to enter into a dual enrollment articulation agreement with a local Florida College System institution if that Florida College System institution has the capacity to offer dual enrollment courses.

A school district may not deny a student access to dual enrollment unless the student is ineligible to participate in the program subject to provisions specifically outlined in statute.

In addition, each high school must offer an International Baccalaureate Program, an Advanced International Certificate of Education Program, or a combination of at least four courses in dual enrollment or Advanced Placement, including one course each in English, mathematics, science, and social studies. To meet this requirement, school districts may provide courses through virtual instruction, if the virtual course significantly integrates postsecondary level content for which a student may earn college credit, as determined by the department of education, and for which a department-approved standardized end-of-course assessment is administered.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Independent, accredited, not-for-profit colleges and universities may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA. 3.0 unweighted high school GPA, or 2.0 unweighted high school GPA for initial and continued enrollment in career certificate dual enrollment courses. Exceptions to required GPAs may be granted on an individual student basis if the educational entities agree and the terms of the agreement are in the dual enrollment articulation agreement. Each comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement between a school district and a Florida College System institution must include the policies and procedures, if any, for determining exceptions to the required grade point averages on an individual student basis.
  • Other. Minimum score on a common placement test adopted by the state board indicating the student is ready for college-level coursework. A student enrolling in a math or English course must have demonstrated adequate precollegiate preparation on the relevant section of the basic computation and communication skills assessment. A student may enroll in college credit courses that are not precluded by the deficiency; however, students may not earn more than 12 college credit hours prior to the correction of all deficiencies.
  • Not specified. Florida College System institution boards of trustees may establish additional initial student eligibility requirements, which must be included in the dual enrollment articulation agreement, to ensure student readiness for postsecondary instruction. Additional requirements included in the agreement may not arbitrarily prohibit students who have demonstrated the ability to master advanced courses from participating in dual enrollment courses.
Districts and colleges may agree to extend dual enrollment participation in Student Life Skills (designated as SLS course prefix in the Statewide Course Numbering System) courses to students who do not meet the statutory eligibility requirements, if alternate eligibility requirements are delineated in the District Interinstitutional Articulation Agreement.

To remain eligible for dual enrollment, a student must maintain the minimum postsecondary grade point average established by the postsecondary institution. Regardless of meeting eligibility requirements for continued enrollment, a student may lose the opportunity to participate in a dual enrollment course if the student is disruptive to the learning process such that the progress of other students or the efficient administration of the course is hindered. The institution may grant an exception if the student is enrolled in a secondary course(s) in the basic competency area(s) for which they s/he has been deemed deficient by the postsecondary readiness assessment.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. Through early admission, a student may enroll in a postsecondary institution on a full-time basis in courses creditable toward the high school diploma and the associate or baccalaureate degree. A participating student must enroll in at least 12 college credit hours per semester or the equivalent. However, a student may not be required to enroll in more than 15 college credit hours per semester or the equivalent. Early admission students are exempt from paying registration, tuition, and laboratory fees.

Career early admission allows students to enroll full-time in a career center or a Florida College System institution in postsecondary programs leading to industry certifications, as listed in the Postsecondary Industry Certification Funding List pursuant to s. 1008.44, which are creditable toward the high school diploma and the certificate or associate degree. Participating students must have completed a minimum of 4 semesters of full-time secondary enrollment, including 9th grade enrollment. Career early admission students are exempt from paying registration, tuition, and laboratory fees.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Local boards must inform all secondary students and their parents of dual enrollment as an educational option and mechanism for acceleration. Students and parents must be informed of student eligibility requirements, the option for taking dual enrollment courses beyond the regular school year, and the minimum academic credits required for graduation. District school boards must annually assess the demand for dual enrollment and provide that information to each partnering postsecondary institution. Alternative grade calculation, weighting systems, and information regarding student education options that discriminate against dual enrollment courses are prohibited. The comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement between each district and Florida College System institution must include a description of the process by which students and their parents are informed about opportunities for student participation in the dual enrollment program.

Each student must complete a career and education planning course in any grades 6-8. The course must result in a completed personalized academic and career plan for the student, which must inform the student of available opportunities to earn college credit in high school, including Advanced Placement courses; the International Baccalaureate Program; the Advanced International Certificate of Education Program; and dual enrollment, including career dual enrollment.

At the beginning of each school year, local boards must also notify parents of students in or entering high school of the opportunity and benefits of advanced placement, International Baccalaureate, Advanced International Certificate of Education, dual enrollment, and Florida Virtual School courses and options for early graduation.

To facilitate meaningful parent and family involvement, the department of education must develop guidelines for a parent guide to successful student achievement that describes what parents need to know about their child's educational progress and how they can help their child to succeed in school. The guidelines must include opportunities for parents to learn about rigorous academic programs that may be available for their child, including dual enrollment.

In addition, the department of education must develop a statement on transfer guarantees to inform students and their parents, prior to enrollment in a dual enrollment course, of the potential for the dual enrollment course to articulate as an elective or a general education course into a postsecondary education certificate or degree program. The statement must be provided to each district school superintendent, for inclusion in the information provided to all secondary students and their parents as required above. The statement may also include additional information, including dual enrollment options, guarantees, privileges, and responsibilities.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. Each comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement between a district and a Florida College system institution must include a description of the process for informing students and their parents of college-level course expectations.Specifically, the District Interinstitutional Articulation Agreement must delineate a formalized process between the high school counselor and the college for informing students and parents or guardians of college course-level expectations, including:
  • Any letter grade below a “C” will not count as credit toward satisfaction of the requirements in Rule 6A-10.030, F.A.C.; however, all grades are calculated in a student's GPA and will appear on their college transcript.
  • All grades, including “W” for withdrawal, become a part of the student's permanent college transcript and may affect subsequent postsecondary admission.
  • While appropriate for college-level study, course materials and class discussions may reflect topics not typically included in secondary courses which some parents may object to for minors. Courses will not be modified to accommodate variations in student age and/or maturity.
  • The selection of courses to meet degree requirements, including approved program common prerequisite courses, in order to minimize student and state costs for excess hours.
  • The inclusion of dual enrollment course plans in their Electronic Personal Educational Planner (ePEP) using the online student advising system known as Florida Academic Counseling and Tracking for Students at the Internet website FACTS.org, as required by Section 1003.413(3)(i), F.S., to minimize enrollment in a random selection of college courses.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student's district, if enrolled in a public institution. When instruction takes place on the postsecondary campus, the school district pays the institution the standard tuition rate per credit hour from funds provided in the Florida Education Finance Program. When dual enrollment is provided on the high school site by postsecondary institution faculty, the school district reimburses the institution for the costs associated with the proportion of salary and benefits and other actual costs. When dual enrollment is provided at the high school by school district faculty, the school district is responsible only for the postsecondary institution's actual costs associated with offering the program.

Any dual enrollment student enrolled at a course offered through a public postsecondary institution is exempt from the payment of registration, tuition, and fees, including laboratory fees. Instructional materials must be made available to dual enrollment public high school students free of charge. Student exemptions from payment of instructional materials and tuition and fees, including laboratory fees, do not apply to students who enroll in an eligible independent institution. A Florida College System institution may provide instructional materials at no cost to a home education student or student from a private school. Instructional materials purchased by a district school board or Florida College System institution board of trustees for dual enrollment students are the property of the purchasing board.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Each faculty member teaching a dual enrollment course must:
  • Meet the qualifications required by the entity accrediting the postsecondary institution offering the course, including meeting the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges' Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement, 2010 Edition, section 3.7.1, for postsecondary instructors in the course and discipline. The qualifications apply to all faculty members regardless of the location of instruction. The postsecondary institution offering the course must require compliance with these qualifications.
  • Provide the institution offering the dual enrollment course a copy of his/her postsecondary transcript.
  • Provide a copy of the current syllabus for each course taught to the discipline chair or department chair of the postsecondary institution before the start of each term. The content of each syllabus must meet the same standards required for all college-level courses offered by that postsecondary institution. All full-time and adjunct faculty teaching dual enrollment courses shall file a copy of their current course syllabus with the college's discipline chair or department chair prior to the start of each term.
  • Adhere to the professional rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the postsecondary institution's faculty or adjunct faculty handbook. Any exceptions must be included in the dual enrollment articulation agreement.
  • Adhere to the rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the postsecondary institution's student handbook, including those related to add/drop and withdrawal policies, student code of conduct, grading policies, and critical dates. Any exceptions must be noted in the dual enrollment articulation agreement.
In addition, each president (or designee) of an institution offering a dual enrollment course must:
  • Provide a copy of the institution's current faculty or adjunct faculty handbook to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course.
  • Provide to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course a copy of the institution's current student handbook, which may include, but is not limited to, information on registration policies, the student code of conduct, grading policies, and critical dates.
  • Designate an individual or individuals to observe all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course, regardless of the location of instruction.
  • Use the same criteria to evaluate faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course as the criteria used to evaluate all other faculty members.
  • Provide course plans and objectives to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course.
The postsecondary institution must provide all adjunct faculty teaching dual enrollment courses with a full-time faculty contact or liaison in the same discipline.

Dual enrollment courses taught at the high school must meet the same competencies required for courses taught on the postsecondary institution campus. To ensure equivalent rigor, the postsecondary institution must in a timely manner provide the faculty member teaching the course a comprehensive, cumulative end-of-course assessment or a series of assessments of all expected learning outcomes in accordance with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges' Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement, 2010 Edition, sections 2.7.4 and 3.5.1. Completed, scored assessments must be returned to the postsecondary institution and held for 1 year. Textbooks and instructional materials must be the same as or comparable to those used in courses offered by the postsecondary institution with the same course prefix and number. The postsecondary institution must advise the school district of instructional materials requirements as soon as that information becomes available but no later than one term before a course is offered.

Course requirements, i.e., tests, papers, or other assignments, for dual enrollment students must be at the same level of rigor or depth as those for non-dual enrollment postsecondary students. All faculty members teaching dual enrollment courses must observe the procedures and deadlines of the postsecondary institution for the submission of grades. A postsecondary institution must advise each faculty member teaching a dual enrollment course of the institution's grading guidelines before the faculty member begins teaching the course.

Dual enrollment courses taught on a high school campus may not be combined with any non-college credit high school course.

The comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement between a school district and a Florida College System institution must identify exceptions, if any, to the professional rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the faculty or adjunct faculty handbook for the postsecondary institution, and exceptions, if any, to the rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the student handbook of the postsecondary institution that apply to faculty members.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Data used in determining a high school’s school grade for public accountability purposes must include the participation rate of students in various acceleration options, including dual enrollment, and the earning of college credit by all eligible students enrolled in the school in dual enrollment programs.
Program evaluation component Yes. Postsecondary institutions must analyze student performance in dual enrollment to ensure that the level of preparation and future success is comparable with non-dual enrollment postsecondary students. Analyses and recommendations must be shared and reviewed with the principal and local school district. High schools must analyze course and instructor evaluations for dual enrollment courses on the high school campus. Analyses and recommendations must be shared and reviewed by both the college and the high school. Colleges must compare student performance, to include final grade and exam, of dual enrollment course offerings on high school campuses and college campuses to ensure that results are comparable to non-dual enrollment sections. Results are made available to the principal, local school district, the college president, and the department of education.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Any course that has a statewide numbering system number must be accepted by Florida public institutions as if the course were taken at their institution. Private institutions are eligible but not required to participate in the statewide course numbering system.

The department of education must develop a statement on transfer guarantees to inform students and their parents, prior to enrollment in a dual enrollment course, of the potential for the dual enrollment course to articulate as an elective or a general education course into a postsecondary education certificate or degree program. The statement must be provided to each district school superintendent, for inclusion in the information provided to all secondary students and their parents as required above. The statement may also include additional information, including dual enrollment options, guarantees, privileges, and responsibilities.

Legislation enacted in 2013 permits a university designated a preeminent state research university credit earned via dual enrollment may not be used to fulfill the requirements of a 9-to-12-credit set of unique courses specifically determined by the university.

Georgia
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has multiple programs: Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment refers to coursework taken for high school and postsecondary credit. A few programs fall under the umbrella of dual credit/dual enrollment:

The ACCEL program is a financial aid program to assist public and private high school students taking dual credit coursework leading toward an associate or baccalaureate degree (Students cannot receive ACCEL program assistance for courses that are part of a technical certificate or diploma program of study.) Students must meet all other HOPE Grant requirements.

The HOPE Grant program is a non-need-based grant program for public and private high school students taking courses from the Technical College System of Georgia’s institutions.

Through the Move on When Ready program, a public school student in grades 11 or 12 takes all of his/her coursework at an eligible postsecondary institution for dual credit.

Joint Enrollment refers to coursework taken only for postsecondary credit (i.e., student's high school has not agreed to accept the postsecondary coursework as credit toward the student's high school graduation requirements). A joint enrollment student is ineligible for Accel Program participation, but may participate in the HOPE Grant program.

Unless otherwise indicated, all policies refer to Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment or Move on When Ready.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment, Move on When Ready)
  • Virtual program (Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment, incl. Move on When Ready) The department may determine the manner in which a course included in the state’s online course clearing-house may be offered as a dual enrollment program.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned All programs but Joint Enrollment: Both

Joint Enrollment: Postsecondary
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes. Students who fail to demonstrate college readiness in reading, writing, and/or math may enroll in a dual credit course if they concurrently enroll in specially designed courses to address their deficits in reading and writing and/or math, be awarded dual credit if they meet readiness standards before or at the point they successfully complete the dual credit course.
CTE component Yes. Students may enroll for dual credit at the Technical College System of Georgia’s institutions. In addition, students enrolled in the Georgia Youth Apprenticeship Program are eligible to earn dual credit upon completing a planned training experience, provided students meet postsecondary readiness established in reading, writing and math for the particular advanced training program or associate's degree.
Unique characteristics Beginning with the graduating high school class of 2015, in order to be eligible to receive a HOPE scholarship, students must complete at least two advanced courses from any of seven categories, including dual credit courses in core subjects, and courses taken at a unit of the University System of Georgia in core subjects where such courses are not remedial and developmental courses. Effective with the graduating high school classes of 2016 and 2017, this requirement increases to at least three and at least four advanced courses, respectively, from the same seven categories.

A college and career academy must obtain certification from the office of college and career transitions within the Technical College System of Georgia. An applicant academy seeking certification must demonstrate how the proposed college and career academy will provide for dual credit and dual enrollment opportunities.

Statute directs the state board to establish rules and regulations to maximize the number of students, effective with entering 9th graders in the 2014-2015 school year, who complete at least one course containing online learning before graduation. This may be met through an online dual enrollment course offered by a postsecondary institution.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Not specified
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Move on When Ready: Both. Private independent nonprofit and private proprietary institutions may also participate.

ACCEL Program: Both. However, coursework must lead to an associate or baccalaureate degree (Students cannot receive ACCEL program assistance for courses that are part of a technical certificate or diploma program of study.)

HOPE Grant Program: Two-year
Student eligibility requirements Dual Credit/Dual Enrolment:
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12. A student in grades 9-10 is eligible if s/he has a 3.50 cumulative GPA and has been approved by the student's high school and postsecondary institution for dual enrollment.
  • Other. Be on track to graduate and maintain satisfactory academic progress towards fulfilling applicable high school graduation requirements. Must take at least two courses a day on campus. Demonstration of college readiness in reading, writing, and mathematics. A student who meets reading and writing readiness standards qualifies to enroll in any dual credit course except in courses that require a strong mathematics foundation. Students who fail to demonstrate college readiness in reading, writing, and/or math may enroll in courses in these subjects if they enroll concurrently in specially designed courses to address their deficits in reading and writing or mathematics or both. Meet local system requirements.
Accel (in addition to above requirements for dual credit):
  • Written approval/recommendation. From student’s high school.
  • Other. Written parental consent, for students under age 18.
Move on When Ready:
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Must have spent previous school year attending a public high school in Georgia.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment (including ACCEL Program and HOPE Grant Program): No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student.

Move on When Ready: No. By definition, a participating 11th or 12th grader is taking all his/her courses at or through an eligible institution or a virtual course.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Yes. Each local school system must provide general information about dual credit courses to all 8th through 11th grade students.

Move on When Ready: Yes. Each local school system must provide general information about the program to all 10th and 11th grade students.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Move on When Ready: Yes. The department, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and the State Board of the Technical College System (or in the case of Move on When Ready, just the department) must develop appropriate forms and counseling guidelines for dual credit courses/Move on When Ready and make such forms and guidelines available to local school systems and eligible institutions. A local school system must also provide counseling services in accordance with the counseling guidelines provided by the department to prospective students and their parents before students enroll in a dual credit course or Move on When Ready. Prior to participating in a dual credit course or the Move on When Ready program, the student and parent must sign the form provided by the school system or by an eligible institution stating that they have received the aforementioned counseling and understand the responsibilities to be assumed in participating in the program.

Specifically, the LEA must provide at a minimum the following advisement to any interested student and his/her parent:
  • The names of eligible institutions, approved courses, information about approved academic transferable credit and local and state high school graduation requirements
  • The name of a contact person at each eligible institution for information concerning the program
  • Procedures for scheduling approved courses between the high school and the eligible institutions
  • Financial information for tuition, books and materials
  • The potential effect of the program on a student completing a course and completing required high school graduation requirements
  • Consequences of course incompletion, course failure and the possible delay of high school graduation
  • Eligibility information for participating in extracurricular activities
  • The academic and social responsibilities of the student and parent, including continuing responsibilities to obey the rules of both the eligible institution and the high school.
In addition, the individual graduation plan each student develops before the end of 8th grade must include opportunities for postsecondary studies through articulation, dual enrollment, and joint enrollment.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Combination of state and student/parent. Tuition is paid by either the Georgia Department of Education or the Georgia Student Finance Commission, depending on the participating dual enrollment/dual credit program. The student/parents will be responsible for some of the costs, which may vary depending on the type of dual enrollment program. Payment for books and materials is dependent on the type of dual program.

Two scholarship programs can help defray the costs that fall to students/parents:
  • The ACCEL program is a non-need-based program to assist public and private high school students taking dual credit coursework leading toward an associate or baccalaureate degree (Students cannot receive ACCEL program assistance for courses that are part of a technical certificate or diploma program of study). Students must meet all other HOPE Grant requirements.
  • The HOPE Grant program is a non-need-based grant program for students taking courses from the Technical College System of Georgia’s institutions.
Move on When Ready: State (department of education)

Joint Enrollment: If a student does not receive funding from one of the above grant programs, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.
How state funds participating high schools Dual Credit: Equal

Move on When Ready: Local school systems do not receive FTE funding for the student, but instead would receive a records fee of $100/per semester for the student.

Joint Enrollment: Unclear
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Dual Credit: Unclear

Joint Enrollment: Equal

Move on When Ready: Equal, with qualifications. Department pays institution the lesser of, less a records fee of $200.00 for administration costs of the local school system:
  • The actual cost of tuition, materials, and fees directly related to the courses taken by the eligible student at such institution; or
  • The amount that the participating eligible student would have earned under this article if he or she had been in equivalent instructional programs in the local school system.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Yes. The department, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and the State Board of the Technical College System of Georgia must jointly establish policies to ensure dual credit courses reflect college-level work. Such policies must include establishing the same content standards, requirements for faculty, course syllabi, and end-of-course exams for dual credit academic and career, technical, and agricultural education courses, whether taught to high school or college students.

Move on When Ready: Courses are taken at postsecondary institution or online.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Statute establishes legislative intent to collect and analyze data to evaluate the effectiveness of dual credit and dual enrollment programs.
Program evaluation component Yes. Statute establishes legislative intent to collect and analyze data to evaluate the effectiveness of dual credit and dual enrollment programs. The department, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and the State Board of the Technical College System of Georgia must jointly establish policies, which must include determining how dual enrollment will be monitored to assure programs meet state standards for college-level work.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. The department, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and the State Board of the Technical College System of Georgia must jointly establish policies, which must include developing a state-wide system for the transfer of college credits earned through dual credit courses.

Hawaii
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Running Start. In addition, statute clarifies that Running Start provisions do not preclude the department of education and the University of Hawaii system from establishing programs by mutual agreement that permit high school students to enroll in college courses.
Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. A career and technical education course is included in the statutory definition of “qualified course” for Running Start.
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Not specified
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. Approval from the student’s parent, high school counselor, and high school principal is part of the Running Start application.
  • Meets entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must pass a standardized test administered by the college that demonstrates the student's ability to succeed at the college level.
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Student must be under the age of 21 as of September 1 of the school year in which the course is taken, and must meet other qualifications deemed appropriate by the department of education or the university; provided that subsequent qualifications do not restrict any student from taking the standardized test.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. The department must provide participating students with guidance in earning credit toward high school graduation upon the satisfactory completion of University of Hawaii courses at the 100 level and above. In practice, this is via the department of education website.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent, unless the student is eligible for free-/reduced-price lunch, in which case the student may apply for a GEAR UP Hawaii Running Start Scholarship. The scholarship is for tuition/fees and required textbooks for a 3- to 4-credit class. Priority is given to students who have not previously received a scholarship, and to seniors.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not applicable—courses are taken only at colleges.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. All Running Start course credits that would otherwise be transferable but for a student's grade level, must be transferable to any University of Hawaii system degree granting institution.

Idaho
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program. 2013 legislation permits up to $150,000 of the funds appropriated to the educational support program to be used for the development and maintenance of a portal of online K-12 or dual credit courses from the Idaho digital learning academy, Idaho school districts, charter schools, and public colleges and universities, accredited Idaho private colleges and universities, and any provider of online courses, provided that courses have been approved by the state department of education.
  • Other
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. At the time a student enrolls in a course, the student must indicate whether the course is being taken for secondary, postsecondary, or dual credit. A student taking several courses may designate some for secondary credit, some for postsecondary credit and some for dual credit.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. To be approved, a professional-technical school must meet 4 out of 5 criteria, with offering of dual credit one of the 5 criteria. Each program of a professional-technical school must have at least 1 dual credit technical course or be approved for postsecondary credit as part of a Tech Prep agreement. Dual credit may be awarded for Tech Prep courses.
Unique characteristics Postsecondary Enrollment Options: A postsecondary institution must give priority to its postsecondary students when enrolling 11th and 12th graders in courses for secondary credit. Once a student has been enrolled in a postsecondary course through Postsecondary Enrollment Options, the pupil may not be displaced by another student.
 
Dual Credit: Districts may apply up to 15% of funds associated with certain staff to defray the cost of providing virtual education coursework, including virtual dual credit coursework. Effective July 2014, districts may apply up to 5% of these funds for such purposes.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, all high schools must provide advanced opportunities (defined as dual credit, Advanced Placement, Tech Prep, or International Baccalaureate), or provide opportunities for students to take courses at a postsecondary campus.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited private two-year trade and technical schools and private, residential, two-year or four-year liberal arts colleges and universities may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Not specified. Additional eligibility requirements are set by the district and participating postsecondary institution. Must include criteria to define “student ability to benefit” from a dual credit program. An institution may require a student to obtain the postsecondary instructor’s approval to enroll in the course.
  • Other. Student must be age 16 or have successfully completed at least one-half of the high school graduation requirements as certified by the high school.
Students seeking admission who do not meet the above requirements may petition the institution's admission committee for consideration. Students enrolled in a public school may seek admission to enroll by submitting a petition to the high school principal’s office and to the admissions office of the postsecondary institution.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework. The state department of education distributes funds from the moneys appropriated for the educational support program to defray the per credit cost charged for dual credit courses taken by seniors who have completed all graduation requirements before the beginning of their final 12th grade semester.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. School districts must annually provide program information to all students in grades 10 and 11.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. To the extent possible, the school district must provide counseling services to pupils and their parents before the pupil enrolls in Postsecondary Enrollment Options courses to ensure that the pupil and parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The district must provide information on the program including who may enroll, what institutions and sources are available under this program, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the pupil enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the pupil's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the pupil and parents. The person providing counseling must encourage pupils and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions prior to the semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate and adequate. 

High school students are provided with a student guide that outlines their responsibilities as well as guidelines for the transfer of credit. Information is posted on the high school’s website regarding enrollment, costs, contact information at the high school and the postsecondary institution, grading, expectations of student conduct, and other pertinent information to help the parents and students understand the nature of a dual credit course. Course cost information is provided to students before they enroll in a dual credit course.

Prior to enrolling, the pupil and the pupil's parents must sign a form provided by the school district and may be obtained from a postsecondary institution stating that they have received the aforementioned information and understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The superintendent of public instruction must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Either student/parent, or the school district may make payments or partial payments for courses taken for secondary credit. The district cannot make payments to a postsecondary institution for a course taken for postsecondary credit only, or for a course from which a student officially withdraws during the first 14 days of the semester, or for courses for audit.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Part of the definition of “dual credit” is that postsecondary institutions work closely with high schools to deliver college courses that are identical to those offered on the college campus.

Dual credit courses are catalogued courses and approved through the postsecondary institution’s regular course approval process. Courses have the same departmental designation, number, title, and credits, and adhere to the same course description and course content as the postsecondary course. Dual credit courses reflect the pedagogical, theoretical and philosophical orientation of the sponsoring faculty and/or academic department at the postsecondary institution.

Dual credit instructors meet the academic requirements for faculty and instructors teaching in postsecondary, or provisions are made to ensure instructors are capable of providing quality college-level instruction through ongoing support and professional development. Teacher qualifications are reviewed, professional development is provided as needed, course content and assessment expectations are reviewed, faculty assessment is discussed, etc.

The postsecondary institution provides high school instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, student assessment criteria, course philosophy, and dual credit administrative requirements before certifying the instructors to teach the college/university’s courses. Instructors teaching dual credit courses are part of a continuing collegial interaction through professional development, such as seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institutions’ faculty and dual credit administration. This interaction addresses issues such as course content, course delivery, assessment, evaluation, and professional development in the field of study. High school faculty is evaluated by using the same classroom performance standards and processes used to evaluate college faculty.

Dual credit students are held to the same course content standards and standards of achievement as those expected of students in postsecondary courses. Every course offered through a dual credit program is annually reviewed by postsecondary faculty from that discipline and dual credit teachers/staff to assure that grading standards meet those in on-campus sections. Dual credit students are assessed using the same methods (e.g. papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs, etc.) as their on-campus counterparts.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Each LEA is required to annually report to the state department of education specified data, including the number of students in each school and for the LEA participating in advanced placement, concurrent enrollment, or college courses while still students in the LEA.
Program evaluation component Yes. Dual credit program practices are assessed and evaluated based on criteria established by the school, institution and State Board to include at least the following: course evaluations by dual credit students, follow-up of the dual credit graduates who are college or university freshmen, and a review of instructional practices at the high school to ensure program quality. A data collection system has been established based on criteria established by the high school, institution and State Board to track dual credit students to provide data regarding the impact of dual credit programs in relation to college entrance, retention, matriculation from high school and college, impact on college entrance tests, etc. A study is conducted every 5 years on dual credit graduates who are freshmen and sophomores in a college or university.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Illinois
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program A Dual Credit course is a college course taken by a high school student for both high school and college credit. State also permits districts to enter into joint agreements with community college districts and other school districts to provide career education or advanced vocational training of 11th and 12th-grade students.

Unless otherwise indicated, all provisions in this profile refer to dual credit.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other. At a career center.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy. However, courses offered by a community college on a high school campus for dual credit must be selected from transfer courses that have been articulated with senior institutions in Illinois, or from the first-year courses in ICCB approved associate in applied science degree programs. As non-credit-bearing courses, developmental/remedial courses do not fall into either of these categories.
CTE component Yes. Students may take CTE courses for dual credit. The Dual Credit Quality Act requires that CTE instructors possess the credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies appropriate to the field of instruction.
Unique characteristics Institutions may adopt policies to protect the academic standing of students who are not successful in dual credit courses, including, but not limited to, options for (i) late withdrawal from a course, and/or (ii) taking the course on a pass-fail basis. All institutional policies relating to the academic standing of dual credit students or the transfer of credit for dual credit courses must be made publicly available by the institution and provided to each dual credit student.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Not-for-profit public and private and certain accredited for-profit institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Students must meet the same academic criteria as those enrolled in credit-bearing college courses, including taking appropriate placement testing.
  • Other: Statute directs the Illinois Community College Board and the Board of Higher Education to develop policies to permit multiple appropriate measures using differentiated assessment for granting eligibility for dual credit to students. The boards are reviewing this provision as of November 2013.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. In some districts, the tuition is completely waived, others offer discounted tuition, and some charge full tuition. This is often related to where the dual credit is delivered (at the high school versus on campus) and who is delivering it (community college faculty versus high school faculty).

For advanced vocational training programs: Participating community college bill each participating school district for the per capita cost of operating the community college attended, or a charge for participation may be made in accordance with the joint agreement between the community college district and the student's school district. Such agreement may not provide for payments in excess of actual operating costs. Participating high schools may use state aid monies to pay the charges.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Dual credit instructors teaching credit-bearing college-level courses must meet the same academic credential requirements as faculty teaching on campus. Instructors for community college courses taught in high schools must be selected, employed and evaluated by the community college. They must be selected from full-time faculty and/or from adjunct faculty with appropriate credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies at the college level. Instructors in career and technical education courses must possess the credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies appropriate to the field of instruction. Course content and learning outcomes must be the same as those for credit-bearing college courses, and learning outcomes must be appropriately measured. Institutions must provide high school instructors with an orientation in course curriculum, assessment methods, and administrative requirements before high school instructors are permitted to teach dual credit courses. Dual credit instructors must be given the opportunity to participate in all activities available to other adjunct faculty, including professional development, seminars, site visits, and internal communication, provided that such opportunities do not interfere with an instructor's regular teaching duties. Every dual credit course must be reviewed annually by faculty through the appropriate department to ensure consistency with campus courses. Dual credit students must be assessed using methods consistent with students in traditional credit-bearing college courses.

For community college courses offered at a high school: All state laws, ICCB regulations, accreditation standards specified by the North Central Association, and local college policies that apply to courses, instructional procedures and academic standards at the college apply to college-level courses offered by the college on campus, at off-campus sites, and at secondary schools. These policies, regulations, instructional procedures and academic standards apply to students, faculty and staff associated with these courses.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The state board must annually assemble all data reported by district superintendents on the number of students enrolled in community college courses, the name and number of the course(s) each such student is taking.

The Illinois Community College Board and the Illinois Board of Higher Education are responsible for oversight and review of dual credit programs offered by public community colleges and institutions, respectively. Each institution must annually report to the appropriate agency on the following data, at a minimum:
  • Number and description of dual credit courses
  • Faculty teaching dual credit courses and their academic credentials
  • Enrollments in dual credit courses
  • Sites of dual credit offerings.
The state board must establish a data warehouse, developed in cooperation with the community college board and the board of higher education, that integrates data from multiple student unit record systems and supports all of the uses and functions of the longitudinal data system set forth in statute. The data warehouse must include student-level enrollment, demographic, and program participation information, including information on participation in dual credit programs.

In addition, school report cards for public reporting purposes must include curriculum information, including dual enrollment courses.
Program evaluation component Yes. The state board, the Illinois Community College Board, and the board of higher education must include information on student participation and performance in dual credit programs and their success in postsecondary education in a statewide longitudinal data system. The data system must track dual credit students and courses on student records. Analysis of data on student success in dual credit courses and postsecondary education performance must be incorporated into the evaluation of dual credit programs in both high school and college.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. The Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI) is a statewide transfer agreement with over 100 participating public and private two- and four-year institutions. All participating institutions agree to accept credits for specific courses. Since dual credit courses are identical to any other college course, the transferability for them is the same as for any on-campus college course.

Indiana
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program A Dual Credit course is one taught by a high school faculty member, a college faculty or adjunct faculty member that a high school student may take to earn both high school and college credits. Dual credit courses may include an on-campus course taught to regular postsecondary students, or a college course taught in a high school classroom by a faculty member of an institution.

A Concurrent Enrollment course is a dual credit taught at a high school by a regular high school faculty member approved by an institution, for high school credit, and college credit if an agreement is made between the school corporation and an institution.

The Postsecondary Enrollment Program allows school corporations (districts) and eligible institutions to offer college courses taught by faculty members of eligible institutions, and concurrent enrollment courses.

School corporations may also offer a supplemental postsecondary education program, or allow a student to attend an education program during the regular school day/school year apart from Postsecondary Enrollment Program. An eligible institution may also allow a public school student to enroll in a course independent of Postsecondary Enrollment Program.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Postsecondary Enrollment Program)
  • At postsecondary institution (Postsecondary Enrollment Program)
  • Virtual program (any “dual credit” course)
  • Other (Postsecondary Enrollment Program) Based on demand for enrollment, an institution may offer a course through telecommunication, or a combination of onsite instruction and telecommunication, at on-campus or off-campus sites.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Depends on course type. A student in:
  • A concurrent enrollment course taught by an approved high school faculty member earns high school credit and may earn college credit through an agreement between the institution and school corporation.
  • An on-campus course taught by a faculty member of an institution as a regular course offering to postsecondary students earns postsecondary credit and must be approved by the student’s high school for high school credit.
  • A college course taught in a high school by a faculty member of an institution may earn both secondary and postsecondary credits.
  • An online course taught by a faculty member of an institution as a regular course offering to postsecondary students earns postsecondary credit and must be approved by the student’s high school for high school credit.
Postsecondary Enrollment Program: Not specified. Awarding of secondary credit is subject to school corporation’s approval of a course for secondary credit. The criteria for determining the courses approved for secondary credit, which may include a provision that a course in which the student intends to enroll is not approved for secondary credit if the course is so unlike any of the approved courses listed in 511 IAC 6-2-5(d) that appropriate secondary credit cannot be given.

Currently, institutions must award postsecondary credit upon a student’s completion of a Postsecondary Enrollment Program course. Effective with courses offered at a high school beginning in the 2014-15 school year, a student must achieve at least the equivalent of a 2.0 on a 4.0 unweighted grading scale to receive postsecondary credit. If the student achieves less than a 2.0 on a 4.0 unweighted grading scale, the dual credit teacher must not submit the grade for the dual credit course to the eligible institution.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes, for programs generally. For purposes of dual enrollment and college credit earned by high school students, statute includes in definition of “postsecondary credit” credit toward a career and technical education certification upon completion of a course offered in a high school setting.

A state educational institution or campus thereof that offers concurrent college courses, including in CTE disciplines, must be either accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, or approved by the commission for higher education.

Effective with students entering high school in the 2012-13 school year, to be eligible for a Core 40 diploma with technical honors, a student must, among other criteria, Earn a minimum of 6 credits in the college and career preparation courses in a state-approved college & career pathway and either complete pathway designated dual credit courses from the lists of priority courses resulting in 6 verifiable transcripted college credits, or earn a pathway designated industry-based certification or credential.

Postsecondary Enrollment Program: The guidelines developed by the department of education must encourage participation by students at all achievement levels and in a variety of academic and vocational subjects.
Unique characteristics It is recommended that schools offering dual credit courses on the high school campus use a dual credit provider from the preferred provider list as developed by the commission for higher education.

To be eligible for a Core 40 diploma with advanced academic honors, a student must complete 1 of 6 criteria – one criterion is completion of dual credit coursework from the priority course list resulting in 6 transferable college credits Another criterion is a combination of completion of 2 Advanced Placement course credits and the corresponding AP test and dual credit coursework from the priority course list resulting in 3 transferable college credits.

Effective with students entering high school in the 2012-13 school year, to earn a Core 40 diploma with academic honors, a student must, among other criteria, choose from 6 criteria, including completion of dual credit courses resulting in 6 verifiable transcripted college credits and two chosen from: a minimum of 3 verifiable transcripted college courses, 2 Advanced Placement course credits and the corresponding AP test, or 2 credits in an IB standard level course and corresponding exams.

Effective with students entering high school in the 2012-13 school year, to be eligible for a Core 40 diploma with technical honors, a student must, among other criteria, earn a minimum of 6 credits in the college and career preparation courses in a state-approved college & career pathway and either complete pathway designated dual credit courses from the lists of priority courses resulting in 6 verifiable transcripted college credits, or earn a pathway designated industry-based certification or credential.

Postsecondary Enrollment Program: The guidelines developed by the department of education must encourage participation by students at all achievement levels and in a variety of academic and vocational subjects. Local policies may not prohibit a student from enrolling in or attending an education program when the student is not required to be in attendance at the student's school corporation.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory. The governing body of each school corporation must adopt policies to implement the Postsecondary Enrollment Program. Further, each high school must provide at least two dual credit and two Advanced Placement course offerings to qualifying students.

An institution must accept or reject a student applying to participate in the Postsecondary Enrollment Program based on the standards ordinarily used to decide student enrollments. However, a student may not be refused admission solely because the student has not graduated from a secondary school.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both All programs: Both. An accredited private college or university may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified. For Postsecondary Enrollment Program, eligibility requirements are set by the eligible institution and the school corporation’s governing body. A school corporation’s eligibility criteria may provide a student ineligible to participate if (1) participation would delay the student's progress toward high school graduation, or (2) the request is for enrollment in a course offered by the student's school and participation would result in cancellation of the course due to low enrollment.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Postsecondary Enrollment Program: No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student, upon the recommendation of a school administrator.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. Each school corporation must annually provide each student in grades 8-11 with information concerning postsecondary enrollment opportunities.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. A representative of the school corporation, by agreement with an eligible institution and using information that may be provided by the eligible institution, must meet with each student who intends to participate in a postsecondary enrollment opportunity, to discuss:
  • The courses in which the student may enroll, including prerequisites needed
  • The postsecondary credit the student earns upon successful completion of a course
  • The consequences of the student's failure to successfully complete a course
  • Notice of the course and schedule
  • The financial obligations of the student and the school under the postsecondary enrollment opportunity
  • The responsibilities of the student, the student's parent, and the school under the postsecondary enrollment opportunity
  • Other matters concerning the postsecondary enrollment opportunity.
Generally: In addition, each state educational institution must make available to students and high school guidance counselors a report indicating the extent to which and conditions under which postsecondary credit may be granted through various programs.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Generally: Student/parent. However, the commission for higher education may identify a set of concurrent enrollment college courses that are offered in the high school setting for postsecondary credit and receive state funding as priority dual credit courses. The commission must set the tuition rate charged a student for a priority dual credit course. The commission on higher education has set tuition at no more than $25/credit hour for 2011-2013 for courses on the Priority Course List. Several institutions offer courses at costs below this commission requirement.

Postsecondary Enrollment Program: For students enrolled at Ivy Tech Community College, the school corporation pays tuition.

Upon demonstration of financial need, an eligible institution may grant a student financial assistance, including a tuition waiver. Ivy Tech is eligible for reimbursement for costs incurred to deliver courses taken by a student whose tuition is waived.
How state funds participating high schools Postsecondary Enrollment Program: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Postsecondary Enrollment Program: Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. The institution must ensure that course content and rigor is adequate to warrant providing credit to a student as if the student took the course as a student at the eligible institution, including determining prerequisites, if any, for enrollment in a dual credit course and standards for assessment. The institution must set the criteria for a faculty member or other instructor teaching the course with the institution or school corporation, depending on whether the course is taught by postsecondary faculty or high school instructor.

In addition, a state educational institution or campus thereof that offers concurrent college courses must be either accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, or approved by the commission for higher education.
Program reporting requirement Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. For each participating student, each school corporation must maintain a record of the courses and credit hours in which the student enrolls, the courses the student successfully completes and fails to complete, the secondary credit granted the student, and any other information requested by the department of education. The department is entitled to access these records.

Each postsecondary institution must maintain the same information for each participating student (recording postsecondary credit granted instead of secondary credit granted). The commission for higher education is entitled to access these records.

At the end of each school year, each school corporation must submit to the department of education a list of the students enrolled in postsecondary enrollment opportunities, and the postsecondary enrollment opportunities courses completed by each such student.
Program evaluation component Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. The department of education, in consultation with the commission for higher education, must annually evaluate postsecondary enrollment opportunities and report to the state board of education concerning the postsecondary enrollment opportunities.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes, if the course is offered by a state educational institution and the course is listed in the statewide core transfer library (such courses are transferable on all campuses of the state educational institutions. The educational institution other than the one the student completed the course with must also grant credit for courses that are subject to an articulation agreement, and may grant credit for other successfully completed courses.

Iowa
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Senior Year Plus (SYP) is an umbrella program created in 2008 that encompasses Concurrent Enrollment, Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEO), Advanced Placement (AP), Career Academies, Regional Academies, and, most recently, Project Lead the Way. Though many of these programs were available to students in Iowa prior to 2008, the SYP legislation was implemented to provide increased and more equal access to college credit and AP courses. SYP programs offer students an opportunity to enroll in college coursework and, in most cases, receive both high school and college credit simultaneously. Specifically, “Senior Year Plus” includes:
  • A “district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment” program administered by the department permitting eligible students in grades 9-12 to enroll part-time in rigorous academic or technical coursework approved by the board of directors of a school district through a contractual agreement between a community college and the school district, during the regular school year, at or through community colleges
  • Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO),” allowing primarily 11th and 12th graders to take college and university courses which are not comparable to courses offered by the secondary institution or offered through concurrent enrollment at an eligible postsecondary institution as a part-time student
  • Courses offered through career academies for college credit
  • Project Lead the Way courses.
“Senior Year Plus” also includes requirements regarding Advanced Placement classes. Provisions specific to Advanced Placement are not listed in this profile.

Dual Enrollment refers to students enrolled in both competent private (i.e., homeschooled) and public instruction simultaneously. Students who are enrolled in college coursework while still in high school are categorized as jointly enrolled (i.e., Joint Enrollment).

An articulated course is offered by a high school through an agreement between a district and a postsecondary institution that allows students to receive college credit upon matriculation based on the demonstrated mastery of concepts in the high school course. (Iowa Admin. Code 281-22.32(8)(c))
Where courses provided District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academy, and Project Lead the Way:
  • At high school
  • At community college
  • Virtual program (e.g., Iowa Communications Network (ICN) or internet)
Postsecondary Enrollment Options:
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: Both, if course previously approved by the school board through annual approval process.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Both

Project Lead the Way: Both, if the course is offered through a community college. School districts may elect to offer a Project Lead the Way course as an articulated course, where the student will earn high school credit upon completion of the course and college credit upon matriculation (assuming requirements contained in the articulation agreements are met).
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Career and technical education courses are eligible under PSEO and district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment. A career academy course may qualify if it meets the requirements of a district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment program.
Unique characteristics All Senior Year Plus Programs: Students from accredited nonpublic schools and homeschooled students may access the program through the school district in which the accredited nonpublic school or private institution is located.

Institutions must ensure students have access to student support services, including but not limited to tutoring, counseling, advising, library, writing and math labs, and computer labs, and student activities, excluding postsecondary intercollegiate athletics. Statute provides funds (when appropriated by the general assembly) for the development of additional Internet-based Senior Year Plus courses.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Students from the Iowa School for the Deaf or the Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School may also participate.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Postseconary Enrollment Options: Mandatory

Other Senior Year Plus programs (i.e., Concurrent Enrollment, Project Lead the Way, Career or Regional Academy programs): Voluntary. However, when a district offers another Senior Year Plus (SYP) program, eligible students must be allowed to participate (a district cannot place barriers to participation that are not contained within the legislation).

All programs: Eligible institutions must allow eligible students to participate.  Eligible institutions may not place restrictions on participation in SYP programming beyond those specified in statute or administrative rule.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academies, and Project Lead the Way: Two-year

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Both. An eligible accredited private institution may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements All Senior Year Plus programs (CTE exception cited below):
  • Written approval/recommendation. Student must have approval of the school board or its designee and the eligible postsecondary institution to register for the postsecondary course.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12 (Postsecondary Enrollment Options).
  • Other. Student must be proficient in reading, math, and science based on their performance on the Iowa Assessments. Proficiency scores for the Iowa Assessments are determined in the Standard Score metric (previously, students had to score at or above the 41st national percentile rank (NPR) in each of the three subject areas) specific to grade, content, and time of year (fall, midyear, and spring). If a student is not proficient in one or more of these content areas, the school board may establish alternative but equivalent qualifying performance measures including but not limited to additional administrations of the state assessment, portfolios of student work, student performance rubric, or end-of-course assessments.)
Concurrent Enrollment, Career Academies, Project Lead the Way: Open to students in grades 9-12.

District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: For a CTE course, a student is exempt from proficiency requirements, but may be required by a community college to complete an initial assessment to determine the applicant's readiness to enroll in career and technical coursework, and the community college may deny the enrollment.

Project Lead the Way: A school district may set additional eligibility requirements to ensure student readiness to achieve success. All students in a district-to-community college shared course must meet the expectations of the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program and must be registered for college credit.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes. A student may not be enrolled in more than 24 college credit hours at any one postsecondary institution during an academic year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment and Project Lead the Way: Yes. Notice of the availability of the program must be included in a school district's student registration handbook. The handbook must identify which courses, if successfully completed, generate college credit under the program. A student and the student's parent must also be made aware of this program as a part of the development of the student's core curriculum plan.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Yes. The availability and requirements of this program must be included in each school district's student registration handbook. Information about the program must be provided to the student and the student's parent prior to the development of the student's core curriculum plan.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for all Senior Year Plus programs. Statute provides for the development of an Internet-based information clearinghouse that allows students to identify participation options within the Senior Year Plus program and transferability between educational systems. The resource must provide links to other similar resources available through various Iowa postsecondary institution systems, and identify course transferability and articulation between the secondary and postsecondary systems in Iowa and between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student's district. However, the payment varies by Senior Year Plus (SYP) program:

Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO): A school district must pay a tuition reimbursement amount to a postsecondary institution that has enrolled its resident eligible students. For a student in an open enrollment situation, tuition is paid by the receiving district. The amount of tuition reimbursement for each separate course must equal the lesser of
  • The actual and customary costs of tuition, textbooks, materials, and fees directly related to the course taken by the eligible student
  • $250
An eligible postsecondary institution must make pro rata adjustments to tuition reimbursement amounts based on federal guidelines.

However, if the student fails to complete and receive credit for the course, the student or parent must reimburse the school district for its costs.

Postsecondary institutions may not charge students for textbooks, materials, or fees directly related to the course in which the student is enrolled except that the student may be required to purchase equipment that becomes the property of the student.

For students at the Iowa school for the deaf and the Iowa braille and sight saving school, the state board of regents must pay a tuition reimbursement amount by June 30 of each year.

Concurrent Enrollment: Districts that enter into a concurrent enrollment agreement are responsible for payment to the cooperating community college per the terms stipulated in their agreement. Districts are eligible to receive supplementary weighting for students enrolled in concurrent enrollment courses. As stipulated in statute, students enrolled in a qualifying concurrent enrollment course are assigned an additional weighting of .70 for career and technical courses and .46 for liberal arts and science courses.

All programs: Districts and eligible postsecondary institutions may not charge students for tuition.
How state funds participating high schools District-to-Community College or Concurrent Enrollment: Funded at a higher level. Students enrolled in eligible courses are given an additional weight of .70 for CTE courses and .46 for liberal arts and science courses. A career academy course may qualify as a concurrent enrollment course if it meets the criteria for district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment programs. A district is also eligible for supplemental funding for concurrent enrollment classes provided via the ICN, or for Project Lead the Way (PLTW) enrollment through sharing with a community college.

Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component All Senior Year Plus Programs: Yes. Course instructors must meet the standards and requirements that other full-time instructors in the academic department are required to meet and that are approved by the appropriate postsecondary administration. Community colleges must report instructor degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards.

District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: Yes. For a district to be eligible for supplemental weighting for participating students, a class must be included in the community college catalog or an amendment or addendum to the catalog, and open to all registered community college students, not just high school students. (The class may be offered in a high school attendance center.) The course instructor must be employed or contracted by a community college. The course must be taught using the community college course syllabus, and taught in such a manner as to result in student work and student assessment that meet college-level expectations.

Project Lead the Way: Yes, A school district offering a Project Lead the Way program must offer the curriculum developed by the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program. An instructor must have successfully completed the training required by and meet the minimum requirements of the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program.
Program reporting requirement All Senior Year Plus programs: Yes. Postsecondary institutions must use the student’s K-12 unique student identifier as part of the institution's student data management system. Institutions must collect data and report to the department on the proportion of females and minorities enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-oriented educational opportunities provided through Senior Year Plus programs. The department must submit the programming data and the department's findings and recommendations in a report to the general assembly annually by January 15. (I.C.A. § 261E.3 (3)(j))

Legislation provides funds (when appropriated by the general assembly) for the development of a data management system, including a transcript repository, for Senior Year Plus programming. The data management system must include information generated by grade 8-12 core curriculum plan provisions, data on courses taken by Iowa students, and the transferability of course credit. (I.C.A. § 261E.13(1)(b)

Postsecondary Enrollment Options, District-to-Community College Sharing and Concurrent Enrollment: Community colleges must annually report to the department of education for the previous fiscal year:
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in community college courses through shared supplementary weighting plans
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in community college courses through shared supplementary weighting plans.
  • Total credits earned by high school students enrolled in community college courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program, broken down by vocational-technical or career program and arts and sciences program
  • Number of courses in which high school students are enrolled under shared supplementary weighting plans and the portions of those courses that are taught by an instructor who is employed by the local school district for a portion of the school day.
Postsecondary Enrollment Options: The board of regents (which oversees public four-year institutions) must annually report to the general assembly:
  • Total revenue received from each local school district as a result of high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control
  • Unduplicated headcount of high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control
  • Total credits earned by high school students enrolled in courses under the postsecondary enrollment options program at the institutions of higher learning under the board's control, broken down by degree program.
District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment and Senior Year Plus: The state board, in collaboration with the board of directors of each community college, must adopt rules that clearly define data and information elements to be collected related to the programs. Data elements must include:
  • The course title and whether the course supplements, rather than supplants, a school district course
  • An unduplicated enrollment count of eligible students participating in the program
  • The actual costs and revenues generated for concurrent enrollment. An aligned unique student identifier system shall be established by the department for students in kindergarten through grade twelve and community college
  • Degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards
  • Salary information including regular contracted salary and total salary
  • Credit hours and laboratory contact hours and other data on instructional time
  • Other information comparable to the data regarding teachers collected in the basic education data survey.
Program evaluation component Yes. A Postsecondary Course Audit Committee annually audits postsecondary courses offered to high school students through district-to-community college sharing or concurrent enrollment to ensure the quality of course offerings.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. However, legislation requires the creation of an Internet-based information clearinghouse that identifies Senior Year Plus program course transferability and articulation between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.

Kansas
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. Through the Kansas Challenge to Secondary School Pupils Act (a.k.a. concurrent enrollment), secondary students may enroll in eligible postsecondary institutions. Students may also access coursework at the high school if the district and an eligible postsecondary institution have approved a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership agreement.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Postsecondary credit.  A school district may but is not required to award secondary credit. The district may deny awarding credit on the basis that high school credit is inappropriate for such coursework.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No. Remedial/developmental course work or coursework that does not apply to a Board of Regents’ approved degree program at the postsecondary partner institution in a CEP agreement is not considered appropriate for college-level credit or eligible for financial reimbursement.
CTE component Yes. Secondary students may enroll in CTE programs conducted by a community college, technical college or institute of technology. They may be charged fees (including textbook charges), but not tuition. Each school year, to the extent secondary CTE funds are available, the state board of regents must distribute state funds to community colleges, technical colleges and the Washburn institute of technology for the cost associated with secondary students enrolled in postsecondary CTE programs as determined by the state board of regents.

Each school year, to the extent sufficient funds are appropriated to the career technical education incentive program, the board of regents must make an award to a community college, technical college or institute of technology that has at least one private secondary school student who is currently or was previously admitted to a CTE course or program in accordance with the above provisions, to reimburse the institution for ½ of the costs of an industry-recognized credential assessment in an occupation identified by the secretary of labor as an occupation in highest need of additional skilled employees at the time the student was admitted into the course or program.
Unique characteristics Private school students may participate in postsecondary CTE programs. Private and homeschool 11th and 12th grade students may be admitted to community colleges if they have an ACT or SAT score at or above the national average, or have a cumulative high school GPA of 3.0 or above.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited independent institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Written approval/recommendation. Student must have been authorized by the principal of the school attended to apply for enrollment at an eligible postsecondary education institution.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must be acceptable or have been accepted for enrollment at an eligible postsecondary education institution, must meet institutional enrollment requirements, follow institutional procedures regarding assessment/placement, have an acceptable score or subscore on a standardized placement test, and meet course prerequisites.
  • Other. Student must have “demonstrated the ability to benefit from participation in the regular curricula of eligible postsecondary education institutions.”
Institutions may set higher standards.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes, for courses offered on the high school campus through a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership agreement. No more than 24 semester credit hours may be earned in concurrent enrollment partnership classes, excluding credit hours earned in tiered technical courses.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. Students must be provided with a student guide created as part of the CEP that outlines their responsibilities in the learning experience as well as a description of how courses may be transferred in the Kansas public postsecondary education system. Advising of students who wish to enroll in CEP classes must be carried out by both the high school and postsecondary institution.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition General coursework: Local decision. For academic courses, tuition is an amount negotiated by the school district and the college/university under this program. Tuition, books, equipment and any other costs of enrollment are the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. No school district may be responsible for the payment of concurrent enrollment tuition.

For CTE coursework: Combination of state and student/parent. Students may be charged fees (including expenses for books and supplies) but not tuition. Each school year, to the extent sufficient monies are appropriated to the secondary CTE program, the state board of regents must distribute state funds to community colleges, technical colleges and the Washburn institute of technology for the cost associated with secondary students enrolled in postsecondary CTE programs.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A student is counted for full-time attendance if the time collectively spent in high school and postsecondary coursework is at least 5/6 time. Otherwise the pupil is counted as that proportion of one pupil (to the nearest 1/10 ) that the total time of the pupil's combined secondary and postsecondary attendance bears to full-time attendance.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. If a district and postsecondary institution enter into a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (CEP) for high school teachers to teach college credit classes during the school day, the CEP agreement must include necessary directions for curriculum, faculty, students, assessment, professional development activities and a listing of principles for assuring quality in programming. CEP arrangements must include collaborative faculty development programming such as pedagogy, instructional design, course management, instructional delivery skill improvement, curricular reform initiatives, and student success assessment strategies.

Courses must have been approved through the institution’s curriculum approval process. The course content, goals, and objectives must be the same as those for the same courses. Materials such as textbooks used must be comparable to those used in the same course throughout the institution. Procedures for selection of textbooks and related material by faculty who teach concurrently enrolled students must follow adopted postsecondary institutional policies. If the course is an approved competency-based course, the competencies must be the same as those for courses not taught to concurrently enrolled students.

Instructors must have either: (1) a master’s degree with 18 credit hours in the assigned course content; or (2) a bachelor’s degree, with at least 24 credit hours in the assigned course content. Both academic and CTE instructors must use the same final examination as given in the same course taught at the institution, and apply the same scoring rubric for the assigned course as used in the on-campus class. Institutions may set higher standards. Teaching evaluations must be conducted. The postsecondary institution must provide instructors with orientation and ongoing professional development.

Faculty teaching college-level tiered technical courses through a CEP must either meet the academic standards above or possess a valid/current industry-recognized credential and a minimum of 4,000 hours of work experience in the specific technical field.

Before approving instructors to teach CEP courses, the postsecondary institution must provide high school instructors with orientation and training in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and CEP administrative requirements. Each CEP must include an implementation plan for ensuring that instructors teaching concurrently enrolled students are part of a continuing collegial interaction through professional development, seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institution’s faculty and administration of the partnership.

Courses offered through a CEP must be reviewed annually by faculty in the discipline at the postsecondary partner to assure that grading standards (i.e., papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs), course management, instructional delivery and content meet or exceed those in regular on-campus sections.

Program reporting requirement Yes, for courses offered at a high school through a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (CEP) agreement. Institutions must report the following as a part of the Kansas Postsecondary Database:
  • Directory information for each high school student enrolled
  • Credit hours generated by each high school student
  • Credentials of faculty teaching CEP courses
  • CEP credit hours generated by each high school student.
In each odd-numbered year, each public postsecondary institution must provide a list of high schools involved in CEP agreements. For each institution, board of regents staff select no more than 2 high schools for reporting. For each high school selected, the institution must submit the following information to the board office:
  • Copy of the CEP agreement, including the implementation plan for professional development of CEP instructors, and student guide for CEP students.
  • Report resulting from the review of CEP courses by postsecondary faculty and dates of most recent review of all CEP courses, aggregated by discipline.
Program evaluation component Yes, for courses offered through a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (CEP) agreement. Each CEP must be reviewed at least every five years by the eligible postsecondary institution to assure compliance and quality considerations as outlined in the board of regents’ CEP policy. The board of regents office will track students who have participated in concurrent enrollment partnerships and other forms of concurrent enrollment.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Kentucky
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs: In a Dual Credit course, a student receives credit from both the high school and postsecondary institution in which the student is enrolled upon completion of a single class or designated program of study, including participating in the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky.

In a Dual Enrollment course, a student is enrolled in a high school and postsecondary institution simultaneously, including participating in the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky.

Instances where dual credit policies differ between courses offered by public technical/community colleges and public four-year institutions are noted in the profile.
Where courses provided Generally: Not specified

Dual Credit:
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other. Course may be delivered at another site other than the high school or postsecondary campus. Course may also be delivered in combination of delivery methods above.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual Credit: Both

Dual Enrollment: Postsecondary credit only
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. A “career pathway program of study” is defined as a coherent, articulated sequence of rigorous academic and CTE courses, including dual credit opportunities, that prepares secondary students for postsecondary study leading to postsecondary degrees, industry certifications, or licensure. One of the purposes of the career and technical education accessibility fund is to develop career pathways and programs of study in high-demand occupational fields for middle and high school students.
Unique characteristics Each secondary school-based decision making council must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP, IB, dual enrollment, and dual credit courses that recognizes that all students have the right to participate in a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. All students willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to such courses provided they meet prerequisites. Any student whose scores on the grade 8 EXPLORE indicate a high degree of readiness for high school must be counseled to enroll in accelerated courses. Any student whose scores on the grade 10 PLAN or grade 11 ACT indicate a high degree of readiness for college must be counseled to enroll in accelerated courses (with an emphasis on Advanced Placement classes).

Statute directs the department of education, upon receipt of adequate federal funding, to identify, in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward advanced placement or dual enrollment instruction, and identify current and future funding sources for advanced placement or dual enrollment instructional programs and the amount of funds available or anticipated from those sources.  Statute also directs the state board to establish long-term and annual statewide goals for increasing the number of high schools providing accelerated classes and college credit for students.

One of the responsibilities of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System is to enhance the relationship of credentials between secondary and postsecondary programs that permit secondary students to enter programs through early admission, advanced placement, or dual enrollment.
A board of education may award standards-based, performance-based credit toward high school graduation for standards-based dual credit courses.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) Dual Credit: A student who successfully completes a KCTCS dual credit course is given special consideration in program admissions when matriculating to a KCTCS program with special or selective admissions requirements.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, each secondary school must offer a core curriculum of AP, IB, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses, using either or both on-site instruction or electronic instruction through the Kentucky Virtual High School or other online alternatives.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Independent institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must have completed prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards. Student must also have applied to and been accepted by institution. All students willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to dual credit and dual enrollment courses provided they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards.
  • Student in grades 11-12 (for CPE Dual Credit only)
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy, for courses generally.

Yes, for courses offered through Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) Dual Credit. Maximum of 12 credit hours per academic year. Exceptions above this limit may be considered and approved by the college’s chief academic officer based on the specific curriculum or program.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. However, while not requiring all students/parents to be notified, the CPE Dual Credit policy notes high schools are responsible for advertising and promoting dual credit opportunities among qualified high school students, parents, and high school faculty.
Counseling/advising is made available to students No, for courses generally.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) and CPE Dual Credit: Yes. The local college/institution and secondary school are each responsible for providing advising to students and parents regarding dual credit courses and the implications for students’ future collegiate enrollment and financial aid. For KCTCS, this advising includes career counseling and college program advising, and promoting matriculation to KCTCS. For CPE, this information should promote matriculation to a public postsecondary institution and include college and career program materials.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition is assessed in all circumstances. Then, dependent on 3 factors (faculty expense, location, and delivery expense), a tuition waiver is applied. The balance not covered by the tuition waiver may be paid by the student/parent, the secondary school, scholarships, or other funding sources.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) Dual Credit: If a course is offered on a KCTCS campus and supported by SEEK funding to the college, the student is deemed to have paid tuition. Approximately 15% of KCTCS Dual Credit courses are covered by SEEK funding.

A 50% tuition waiver is offered students in dual credit CTE and/or general education courses if the course is taught by a college faculty member at the partnering high school or area technology center/technical high school, and all instructional costs are covered by the college. The college waives tuition when there is not a direct expense (i.e., college is not paying the faculty or paying for the location). The college charges for faculty, location, and expenses actually incurred.

A 100% tuition waiver is offered students in dual credit CTE and/or general education courses if the course is taught by a secondary teacher at the partnering high school or area technology center/technical high school, and all instructional costs are covered by the secondary school. Students receiving a 100% tuition waiver are assessed a KCTCS charge for the administrative expense per semester (i.e., creating and maintaining student records) incurred by KCTCS for offering the course. The charge is paid by either the student/parent, the college by using a scholarship, or a third party (i.e., office of career and technical education, high school, school district, or a private or other entity). Each KCTCS college, in partnership with school districts, must identify local scholarship funds to cover the administrative charge for students who demonstrate financial need.

KCTCS and the department of education must collaborate in developing a process to determine student eligibility for financial assistance apart from these tuition waivers.

Council on Postsecondary Education Dual Credit: The public postsecondary institution must collaborate with the high school to develop a process to determine student eligibility for financial assistance.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Statute directs the Council on Postsecondary Education, in conjunction with the Kentucky Board of Education and the Education Professional Standards Board, to develop guidelines for content knowledge and teacher training in dual enrollment and dual credit programs offered in Kentucky.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) and CPE Dual Credit: KCTCS colleges and postsecondary institutions are responsible for the academic integrity of the courses. Each college/institution must ensure the quality (equivalency of student learning outcomes for four-year institutions), consistency, and rigor of courses accepted for dual credit. Coursework must be relevant to a credential offered at the college/institution, and include the same course competencies and result in the same learning outcomes as the course taught at the college/institution.

When KCTCS or a public four-year institution seeks to change the learning outcomes for any dual credit program or course, KCTCS must notify the department of education when the KCTCS curriculum approval/course revision process is initiated (or public postsecondary institution must notify the schools involved). If it is determined that the proposed change will have an adverse effect on the award of college credit, KCTCS will identify appropriate standards for content, quality, and rigor pursuant to the requirements of SACS-COC for the program/course revision. The department of education must ensure that courses approved for dual credit incorporate any changes that occur in the same courses at KCTCS.

KCTCS: Students receive a syllabus by the first or second day of the course. The syllabus includes course requirement information, including the official description, course prerequisites, course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements/performance standards, and other related course information, as well as criteria to be used in evaluating the student’s performance. The KCTCS grading policy applies to dual credit courses.

CPE: Dual credit courses and the instructors of those courses comply with all appropriate Southern Association of Colleges and Schools - Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC) criteria. Dual credit courses must be taught by postsecondary faculty or secondary school teachers approved by the postsecondary institution as having appropriate credentials established by the SACS-COC Guidelines for Faculty Credentials and university policy. Secondary school faculty must demonstrate compliance with teaching credentials and qualifications. The postsecondary institution grading policy applies to dual credit courses. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that each secondary school teacher teaching dual credit courses develops and uses a course syllabus with appropriate learning outcomes and content for each course. Secondary schools are responsible for providing detailed information to students in writing (i.e., a syllabus) consistent with the public postsecondary institution policy. This information shall include the nature of the course and the expectations and requirements that correspond to its official catalog description. Course requirement information must include course prerequisites, course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements, performance standards, information on adding and dropping courses, and other related course information.

CPE postsecondary institutions are responsible for conducting faculty evaluations for dual credit teachers in a manner consistent with the postsecondary institution’s guidelines for evaluation of adjunct faculty and student evaluation of faculty (i.e., conducting evaluations in a manner consistent with SACS-COC standards).
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Yes, for CPE Dual Credit. The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) is responsible for creating an accountability index for students and institutions participating in dual credit experiences. The index will include both the matriculation of students to postsecondary institutions after dual credit experiences and the success of these students measured by retention and completion of postsecondary credentials.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Credit earned through dual enrollment/dual credit must be treated the same as credit earned on the college campus.

Louisiana
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two active programs: Dual Enrollment means a program established by the Board of Regents to offer high school students the opportunity to enroll in coursework creditable towards a career certificate or an associate or baccalaureate degree. Students may elect to take courses for high school and postsecondary credit, or postsecondary credit only. Dual enrollment courses may be offered through the Louisiana Course Choice Program.

A student in grades 11-12 may use a TOPS – Tech Early Start Award to pursue an industry-based occupational or vocational education credential that is identified by the Occupation Forecasting Conference as a credential for an occupation in top demand in Louisiana, is recognized by the State Industry-Based Certification Council, and is approved by the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and by the Board of Supervisors of Community and Technical Colleges.

In addition, a high-ability high school student may be admitted to a college on a full-time basis. Upon earning at least 24 semester hours at the college level, the student is eligible to receive a high school diploma.

Funding for the Louisiana Early Start Program was not included in the budget for the 2012-13 fiscal year. Policies specific to this program are not included in this profile.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Dual Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Dual Enrollment)
  • Not specified (TOPS – Tech Early Start Award)
  • Virtual program (Course Choice Program)
  • Other. An appropriate neutral setting
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual Enrollment: Not specified. A dually enrolled student may take a course for secondary credit, for secondary and postsecondary credit, or postsecondary credit only.

TOPS-Tech Early Start Award: Postsecondary only
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. The TOPS – Tech Early Start Award provides grants for 11th and 12th graders to pursue occupational/vocational training through a public postsecondary institution that offers an occupational or vocational education credential in a top demand occupation.

In addition, students pursuing a career major must have the opportunity to dually enroll in a community or technical college, or participate in a business internship or work-study program when such opportunities are available and appropriate. Each district must offer one or more career major programs, though a state board waiver may be granted for good cause. Schools must review majors offered each year and expand offerings as appropriate, including courses offered through articulation and dual enrollment.
Unique characteristics Dual Enrollment: Homeschooled and private school students who meet eligibility requirements for public school students are eligible to participate. State funds may not be used to pay the tuition of homeschooled and private school students, but the amount of tuition charged the student must be the same as the state pays on behalf of a public school student.

Statute directs the state board to revise the school and student accountability system to recognize schools and districts that improve their high school graduation rates and for the number of students who complete programs that lead to industry-based certifications and International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, and dual enrollment courses.

The course selection process for the Course Choice Program must be focused on core academic subject offerings, CTE courses, and college credit courses (either Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate or dual enrollment).

The state’s College and Career Readiness Commission must make recommendations for statewide policies, guiding principles, and programs that address the state’s current and future economic needs and promote student success in high school and beyond. In making recommendations, the commission must consider strategies for increasing dual enrollment opportunities for high school students, including an emphasis on: (a) Early entry into postsecondary education institutions, (b) The identification of funding sources for such dual enrollment opportunities, and (c) Improved articulation agreements between secondary schools and postsecondary education institutions.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Dual Enrollment: Mandatory

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Unclear
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Dual Enrollment and TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Both. Course providers through the Louisiana Program may also offer dual enrollment courses.
Student eligibility requirements Dual Enrollment:
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. At least 15 years old. Students must meet any other eligibility criteria set by the Board of Regents
TOPS-Tech Early Start Award:
  • Minimum GPA. Cumulative high school GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Have prepared a five-year education and career plan, including a sequence of related courses with a career focus as provided by the High School Career Option. Score of at least 15 on the English and math subsections of the ACT PLAN. Enroll in a course in an Industry-Based Occupational or Vocational Education Credential Program in a top demand occupation.
To continue receiving a TOPS-Tech Early Start Award, a student must:
  • Agree that the award will be used exclusively for educational expenses
  • Be a student in good standing in a Louisiana public high school, and in a Louisiana public postsecondary institution
  • Maintain a high school GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, and by the spring term, a college grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Continue to pursue course(s) leading to an industry-based credential in a top demand occupation
  • Maintain steady academic progress as defined in regulations.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Dual Enrollment: Not set in state policy

TOPS-Tech Early Start Award: Yes. Six credit hours per semester, or 12 credit hours per academic year, during grades 11-12.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Dual Enrollment: No

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Yes. The Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance (LOSFA) must provide the information necessary to fully inform Louisiana public high school students and their parents on the requirements of and procedures for applying for and maintaining the award.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Dual Enrollment: State, for public school student. Student/parent, for nonpublic school student.

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance (LOSFA)
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Dual Enrollment: Yes. Course content may not be any less than that which is required of a similar course open to postsecondary students only. The secondary and postsecondary institutions must agree upon faculty appointment. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that secondary faculty possess necessary qualifications and meet appropriate regional and program accreditation requirements for instruction. Secondary institutions must also ensure that postsecondary faculty possess necessary qualifications and meet appropriate accreditation requirements for instruction.

In addition, providers offering dual enrollment courses through the Louisiana Course Choice Program must ensure that courses meet the standards and grade-level expectations of the high school course for which the student is receiving credit and meet the standards for college credit as established by the board of regents.

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Yes. The Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance (LOSFA) must conduct audits of participating Louisiana public postsecondary institutions to ensure compliance with program requirements.
Program reporting requirement Dual Enrollment: Yes. Postsecondary institutions must annually report to the board of regents dual enrollment courses offered, where offered, the numbers of students enrolled in each, and the course credit awarded in each.

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Yes. Prior to the convening of each regular legislative session, the board of regents, in consultation with the Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission, must provide the governor, and the house and senate education committees a written review and analysis of TOPS-Tech Early Start awards, i.e., award use by students and the benefits of awards, as well as the impact on subsequent use by students of TOPS-Tech awards.
Program evaluation component Dual Enrollment: No

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Yes. While not exclusive to the Early Start Award, statute directs the board of regents to develop and implement a uniform Taylor Opportunity Program for Students information reporting system for the purposes of policy analysis and program evaluation and to provide data to the legislature, the governor and appropriate executive branch agencies, and the public on the program’s impact.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits All programs: Yes. The statewide articulation agreement between the board of regents and the state board of elementary and secondary education must provide for postsecondary institutions to accept credits earned in dual enrollment, and guarantee the statewide articulation of appropriate CTE programs and workforce development programs and transfer of course credits between secondary schools and technical and community colleges.

The board of regents must maintain a statewide course numbering system for postsecondary and dual enrollment education in all public secondary and postsecondary institutions, to facilitate program planning and the transfer of students and course credits between and among secondary and postsecondary educational institutions. Equivalent courses must be guaranteed to transfer to any educational institution participating in the statewide course numbering system.

In addition, the board of supervisors of community and technical colleges must collaborate with the state board to ensure that secondary students enrolled in postsecondary CTE and industry-based certification courses offered through local public school systems and secondary schools are also eligible to earn academic transfer modules that can be applied to award a student with partial or full credit in an equivalent academic course offered by any public state community college.

Maine
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs: A general program (no program title in statute) allows students to enroll in postsecondary courses.

A dual enrollment career and technical education program allows students in grades 11 and 12 to enroll in postsecondary CTE courses for high school and postsecondary credit.
Where courses provided Both programs: Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned General program: Postsecondary credit. District may choose to award secondary credit.

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. “Dual enrollment career and technical education program” means a learning pathway for a specific CTE program that provides students in grades 11-12 with the opportunity to take postsecondary education courses and earn credits toward a high school diploma and an associate’s degree.
Unique characteristics General program: A home-schooled student may also receive a state subsidy for postsecondary courses if the student meets course prerequisites and academic fitness requirements.

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: This program provides a 3-year cohort-based experience that includes up to 3 years of summer career academies and a college freshman seminar experience, meets national concurrent enrollment standards, and concludes at the end of summer after the student's senior year in high school. The program includes individual learning plans, academic and career assessment, college and career advising, career exploration and job-shadowing opportunities matched to achieve the student's individual academic and career goals.

The career and technical education center or region may enter into a contract with a service provider that operates as a nonprofit organization to provide technical assistance in developing and implementing the initial phase of the dual enrollment program.

A student who has satisfactorily completed the junior and senior years in a dual enrollment career and technical education program may be eligible to receive a high school diploma from the secondary school the student last attended, although the student may not meet the graduation requirements set forth in statute. The student who successfully demonstrates proficiency as defined in statute may be eligible to receive a high school diploma from the secondary school the student last attended.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary General program: Not specified

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Voluntary. However, to the greatest extent possible, a CTE program offered at a center or region must provide students the opportunity to take advantage of any applicable learning pathways, including learning pathways set forth in a collaborative agreement with publicly supported secondary and postsecondary educational institutions that form a dual enrollment career and technical education program.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. The Maine Maritime Academy may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements General program:
  • Minimum GPA. Minimum 3.0 or equivalent of “B” average, unless waived by the postsecondary institution.
  • Written approval/recommendation. Student must obtain school unit approval, and a recommendation from the student's school administration or one of the student's secondary school teachers to take a postsecondary course or courses at an eligible institution, following an assessment of the student by the school administration.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must meet course prerequisites.
  • Other. Parental approval. Policy also states that if a student does not meet all approval criteria set in statute, the student may still participate in dual enrollment provided the student is at least in grade 11, has received a recommendation from the student's high school and has received approval from a postsecondary institution.
Dual enrollment career and technical education program:
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Student must be a full-time student at a public secondary school and enrolled in a CTE program at a career and technical education center or a career and technical education region.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. School administrative units must provide parents and students with general information on postsecondary education options.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition General program: Combination of department of education and student/parent. A student may be eligible for a state subsidy for postsecondary courses if the student meets program eligibility requirements. The department pays 50% of tuition for the first 6 credit hours taken each semester, up to 12 credit hours per academic year. The institution may impose fees and charges, other than tuition, that are ordinarily imposed on its students. Funds appropriated to the department to carry out the purposes of this program must be in addition to the customary ongoing amounts appropriated for general purpose aid for local schools.

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Not specified
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component General program: Not set in state policy

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Yes. A program must meet national concurrent enrollment standards.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits General program: Yes

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Unclear

Maryland
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Other. Students must be enrolled in a public high school.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. No reference is made to parents. However, all students who meet enrollment requirements must be made aware of the opportunity to dually enroll.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition A public institution of higher education may not charge tuition to a dually enrolled student. under the College and Career Readiness and College Completion Act of 2013.  The Act is silent on fees.

Tuition Scale:  Local Boards of Education pay the lesser of tuition costs for dually enrolled public secondary school students as follows:
  • Category 1:  First 4 courses – Public Senior Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) charge 75% of tuition. Community colleges charge 75% of tuition or 5% of per pupil foundation amount
  • Category 2:  5 or more courses – Public Senior IHEs charge 90% of tuition, Community colleges charge 90% of tuition or 5% of per pupil foundation amount
  • Category 3:  For Agreements established prior to July 1, 2013: If lesser than categories 1 or 2, the agreement is the basis for tuition. 
Local boards may recoup costs from students as follows:
  • First 4 courses – Boards may charge students a fee not to exceed 90% of  the amount paid for tuition
  • 5 or more courses – Boards may charge students  a fee not to exceed 100% of  the amount paid for tuition
  • Boards must waive tuition fees for students who are eligible for Free and Reduced Price Meals (FARMS).
Fees: Colleges can charge applicable and reasonable fees for all dually enrolled students, including those who receive Free and Reduced Price Meals. Note:  If an agreement exists between a public school and a public IHE whereby the school agrees to pay for more than 4 courses, the school must pay for the number under the agreement. Students are encouraged to contact the college admissions office or their school counselor to seek further information.

The Maryland Higher Education Commission administers an Early College Access Grant for dually enrolled students, as well as a grant program for part-time undergraduate students, including dually enrolled students. Under both programs, grant recipients must demonstrate financial need according to cCommission-established criteria. The Commission allocates Early College Access Grant funds to an institution based on the number of dually enrolled students receiving credit for courses completed at the institution. The institution then distributes the grant awards to eligible students.

Funds under the part-time undergraduate grant program are allocated by the Commission to each institution based on the number of undergraduate part-time students who demonstrate financial need. The institution then distributes the grant awards to eligible students. Institutions may use up to 10% of the part-time grant allocation to provide grants  togrants to students who are dually enrolled.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy. All dual enrollment courses are in state-approved academic programs in degree-granting institutions.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The Maryland Longitudinal Data System Center must annually report to the governor and general assembly the number of dually enrolled students and the number and course names of courses in which dually enrolled students enroll.

An institution of higher education that receives dual enrollment grant funds (a.k.a. Early College Access Grant funds) must provide the commission of higher education with an annual audit of the use of the funds.
Program evaluation component Yes. The Governor’s P-20 Leadership Council of Maryland is charged with ensuring college and career readiness and college completion strategies are implemented. The council must report to the governor and general assembly by December 2014, and every two years thereafter, on the progress of implementing specific college and career readiness and college completion strategies, including the Early College Access Grant/dual enrollment efforts.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Massachusetts
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. A student may enroll in coursework for high school and secondary credit.
Where courses provided Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics Nonpublic school students may also participate. However, the crediting of such attendance for receipt of a high school diploma is at the discretion of the nonpublic school.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Not specified
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition State. The Massachusetts Department of Higher Education distributes funds to institutions through an RFP process.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear

Michigan
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs: Postsecondary Enrollment Options allows students to enroll in postsecondary courses for high school and/or postsecondary credit. Under the Career and Technical Preparation Act (2000), a student may enroll in a CTE course at an eligible postsecondary institution.

In addition, fifth-year high school pupils in attendance at a school district, intermediate school district or public school academy may enroll in postsecondary or CTE preparation dual enrollment courses if the pupil has not met all high school diploma requirements, and is enrolled in not more than 2 postsecondary dual enrollment courses taken at any given time and not more than 4 postsecondary enrollment courses taken during the school year. The pupil must have a plan on file at the district to complete district graduation requirements within the academic year, including postsecondary dual enrollment options.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program. The Michigan Virtual High School is authorized to offer college level equivalent courses and dual enrollment opportunities. In addition, there is allocated an amount not to exceed $9,387,500 for 2013-14 for the Michigan virtual university to operate the Michigan virtual learning research institute. One of the tasks of the institute is to create and maintain a public statewide catalog of online learning courses being offered by all public schools in the state. If the course offerings are included in the statewide catalog of online courses, the Michigan virtual school operated by the Michigan virtual university may offer online course offerings, including dual enrollment opportunities.
     
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both programs: Not specified. At the time a public school student enrolls in a postsecondary course, he/she must designate whether the course is for high school or postsecondary credit, or both. A nonpublic school student may enroll only for postsecondary credit and may not receive high school credit for the course. Exceptions provided for a course that would be determined “a nonessential elective course” under specified circumstances.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. The provisions of the Career and Technical Preparation Act mirror those of Postsecondary Enrollment Options, but are specific to postsecondary coursework taken by high school students for high school and/or postsecondary credit.
Unique characteristics Both programs: Nonpublic school students may also participate.

An eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program may give priority to its postsecondary students when enrolling Postsecondary Enrollment Options or Career and Technical Preparation Act students for high school credit only. Once a student has been enrolled in a course through one of these programs, the postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program may not displace the student with another student.

If a school district or public school academy maintains pupil portfolios for high school pupils, each pupil's portfolio must include all academic records and correspondence relating to the pupil's participation in a postsecondary course under the postsecondary enrollment options act.

There is allocated for 2013-14 an amount not to exceed $80,000,000.00 to provide incentive payments of $52 per pupil to districts that meet best practices set forth in statute. A district will receive an incentive payment if, by June 1, 2014, it satisfies at least 7 of 8 requirements, including supporting opportunities for students to receive postsecondary credit.

Any additional funding provided to community college operations in fiscal year 2013-2014 that exceeds the amounts appropriated for operations in fiscal year 2012-2013 is distributed based on a formula that gives 15% consideration to a college’s local strategic value component, as developed in cooperation with the Michigan community college association. The appropriation for local strategic value must be allocated to each community college that certifies to the state budget director, through a board of trustees resolution by November 1, 2013, that the college has met 4 out of 5 best practices listed in each of three categories, including an “educational partnerships” category. One of the five “educational partnerships” criteria is that the community college has active partnerships with regional high schools, intermediate school districts, and career-tech centers to provide instruction through dual enrollment, direct credit, middle college, or academy programs.

A high school that does not offer all credits it must offer for purposes of accreditation may maintain accreditation by ensuring students can access the required credits by another means, such as enrollment in a postsecondary course under the postsecondary enrollment options act.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Both programs: Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both programs: Both. Tribal colleges and independent nonprofit colleges and universities may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Other. Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Student must have either earned a qualifying score in each subject area on a readiness assessment in English, mathematics, reading, social studies, and science selected by the superintendent of public instruction, or the Michigan merit examination. If not, student is limited to a course in a subject area for which he or she has achieved a qualifying score, a course in computer science or foreign language not offered by the school district, or a course in fine arts as permitted by the school district. Career and Technical Preparation Act: A student who has not taken the Michigan merit examination must have achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on a readiness assessment and a student who has taken the Michigan merit examination must have achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on the Michigan merit examination. A student who has not achieved a qualifying score in all subject areas on a readiness assessment or the Michigan merit examination. A student who has not achieved a qualifying score on either assessment may be eligible if he/she achieves a qualifying score in math and a qualifying score on a nationally or industry recognized job skills assessment test as determined by the superintendent of public instruction.
Cap on number of credits students may earn For both programs: If there is no written agreement between a student’s school district and the eligible postsecondary institution to waive limits, a course is not an eligible course if the student’s participation would exceed: (1) more than 10 courses overall; (2) more than 2 courses per year if student first enrolls in a course in grade 9, not more than 2 courses during each academic year in the student's 1st, 2nd , or 3rd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program and not more than 4 courses during the academic year in the student's 4th academic year of enrollment; (3) If the student first enrolls in a course in grade 10, not more than 2 courses during the 1st academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career or technical preparation program, not more than 4 courses during 2nd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program, and not more than 4 courses during 3rd academic year of enrollment in an eligible postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program; or (4) subject to the limit of 10 courses overall, if the student first enrolls in a course when the student is in grade 11 or 12, not more than 6 courses during either of those academic years. A student must be enrolled in at least 1 high school course.

In addition, a 5th year high school student who has not completed all high school graduation requirements is limited to enrollment in no more than 2 postsecondary or CTE preparation courses at any one time, and no more than 4 such courses during the school year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Both programs: Yes. Each district and state approved nonpublic school must provide general information about both programs to all students in grades 8 and higher. Each school district or state approved nonpublic school must provide information to all high school students both programs, including enrollment eligibility; the institutions (or CTE programs) and types of courses eligible for participation; the decision making process for granting academic credits; an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, and of financial arrangements for eligible charges and for paying costs not paid for by the school district or department of treasury; eligibility for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district or department of treasury, as applicable; an explanation that, if the student qualifies for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district or department of treasury, the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, will pay that support directly to the eligible postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program) upon being billed by the eligible postsecondary institution and that the student is not responsible for that payment but is responsible for payment of costs not paid for; available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course in which the eligible student enrolls, including the possibility of being required to repay the school district or department of treasury, as applicable, for money paid on behalf of the eligible student; the effect of enrolling in a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements; and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the eligible student and his/her parent or guardian.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Both programs: Yes. To the extent possible, a school district or state approved nonpublic school must provide counseling services to an eligible student and his/her parent before the student enrolls in a postsecondary (or CTE preparation) course to ensure that the student and parent are fully aware of the benefits, risks, and possible consequences of enrolling in the course. The person providing the counseling must encourage the eligible student and his /her parent to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program) before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate. A school district or state approved nonpublic school may provide this required counseling in a group meeting if additional personalized counseling is also made available.

Before enrolling in a course at a postsecondary institution (or CTE preparation program), a student and his/her parent must file with the postsecondary institution or CTE preparation program a signed form provided by the student's district or nonpublic school stating that the student is an eligible student and has received the aforementioned information and counseling, and that the student understands the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in the course. Upon request, the department must provide technical assistance to a district or nonpublic school and to an eligible postsecondary institution or CTE preparation program in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines for these purposes.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Both programs: Combination of state, district, and student/parent. For a public school student, the district is required to pay to the higher education institution either the amount of the tuition or the amount of state funding the district receives for that student for the part of the day the student attends the course or career and technical preparation program. For example, if a student is enrolled in PSEO or Career and Technical Preparation Act coursework 20% of the school day and the district receives $10,000 from the state for that student, the district must pay the higher education institution either the cost of tuition or $2,000 (20 x $10,000), whichever is less.

A district may, but is not required to, pay more to a postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program on a student’s behalf than is required by statute, and may use local school operating revenue for that purpose.

The student must pay any additional tuition costs above and beyond what the district pays.

For a nonpublic school student, the department of treasury pays the institution or career and technical preparation program. The student is responsible for paying the remainder of the costs that exceed the amount the department of treasury is statutorily required to pay.

A public school or nonpublic school student who does not complete a course must refund the school district or department of treasury any funds not reimbursed the district or department of treasury by the postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program. If the eligible student does not repay this money, the school district may impose sanctions against the public school student as determined by school district policy.
How state funds participating high schools Both programs: Equal, provided the number of classes a student is enrolled in at a high school and postsecondary institution equal the number of classes per day required to be classified as a full-time pupil or of a reduced schedule, or the sum of high school and postsecondary course time and the number of hours of travel time meet the minimum number of hours required to meet a reduced schedule.

A student may not be enrolled beyond full-time in high school/postsecondary or career and technical preparation courses combined, is not retaking a course after failing to achieve a satisfactory grade, or is enrolled in a course contrary to eligibility provisions.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal 
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Both programs: Yes. Each intermediate school district must annually collect the following information from its constituent school districts and provide to the department of education: the amount of money expended by the school district for payments required under each program; the number of eligible students who were enrolled in the school district and the number of those eligible students who enrolled in 1 or more postsecondary or CTE courses and received payment of all or part of eligible charges, both in the aggregate and by grade level; the percentage of the school district's enrollment represented by the eligible students described above, both in the aggregate and by grade level; and the total number of postsecondary or CTE courses for which the school district made payment, the number of those courses for which postsecondary credit was granted, the number of those courses for which high school credit was granted, and the number of those courses not completed by the eligible student.

Each participating postsecondary institution and CTE preparation program must annually report to the department the number of eligible students who enrolled in the institution or CTE program during the preceding academic year; the total number of courses completed by participating students at the institution or CTE preparation program during the preceding academic year; the number of aforementioned courses for which the institution or CTE preparation program granted a participating student postsecondary credit; and the number of aforementioned courses for which the institution or CTE preparation program declined to grant postsecondary credit.

By March 1 of each year, the department must submit to the house and senate fiscal agencies and the department of technology management, and budget a summary annual report on the information received through these provisions. 

In addition, if a district board wants all of its schools to be accredited, it must submit an annual report to the state board that must include, for each high school in the district, the number and percentage of pupils in the school who enrolled during the preceding school year in 1 or more postsecondary courses under the postsecondary enrollment options act, and in comparison with the year preceding that. The department must prepare and submit to the legislature a report of the information submitted through district reports, aggregated for statewide and intermediate school district totals.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Minnesota
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options (the first state-level dual enrollment policy in the U.S.) refers to student enrollment in courses offered by postsecondary institutions for either postsecondary credit alone, or high school and postsecondary credit. Under Postsecondary Enrollment Options, Concurrent Enrollment refers to courses taught by a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member at a secondary school, or another location as per an agreement between a public school board and the postsecondary institution.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Other (Course may be offered at another location according to an agreement between a public school board and the governing body of an eligible public postsecondary system or an eligible private postsecondary institution)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. A district must grant academic credit to a course for secondary credit, but must grant academic credit for a postsecondary course only if requested by a student.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. A student in grades 10-12 may enroll in a CTE course offered by a Minnesota state college or university. An applicant 10th grader must have received a passing score on the 8th grade Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment in reading. A student who is refused enrollment by a Minnesota state college or university may apply to a private, nonprofit two-year trade and technical school granting associate degrees, or an opportunities industrialization center accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. If a student receives a “C” or better in the CTE course, the postsecondary institution must allow the student to take additional postsecondary courses for secondary credit.

A district offering a CTE course as a concurrent enrollment course (taught at the high school by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member) may receive aid for the course only if it is a technical course within a recognized CTE program of study approved by the commissioner of education and the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.
Unique characteristics Tribal school, home-schooled and private school students may also participate, and their program costs are paid by the department of education. A nonpublic secondary institution must proportionately adjust its tuition to accurately reflect the time an alternative pupil spends in a postsecondary enrollment course or program.

A postsecondary institution must give priority to its postsecondary students when enrolling 10th, 11th, and 12th grade pupils in its courses. However, once a student has been enrolled in a postsecondary course through Postsecondary Enrollment Options, the student may not be displaced by another student.

The postsecondary institution must inform the student of the support services available at that institution. If the student has an individualized education program (IEP) that provides general education support and accommodations, the postsecondary institution must provide the support services as described in the IEP and the postsecondary institution and the district must negotiate an agreement on the rate to be charged for the services. Nothing may prevent the student from enrolling while the agreement is being developed. If the parties cannot agree on the services, on application of either party, the commissioner of education must resolve the dispute in the same manner the commissioner fixes tuition rates for K-12 special education instruction and services outside a student’s district of residence.

A student enrolled in a high school 40 miles or more from the nearest eligible institution may request that the district offer one or more accelerated or advanced academic courses, and a district must offer an accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit a student requests such a course. A student may enroll in a course offered for either secondary or postsecondary credit. The district may decide which course to offer, how to offer the course, and whether to offer one or more courses. The district must offer at least one such course in the next academic period and must continue to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit in later academic periods.

High school dropouts under the age of 21 who are participating in the graduation incentives program to earn a high school diploma are eligible to participate in Postsecondary Enrollment Options.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private, nonprofit two-year trade and technical school granting associate degrees, an opportunities industrialization center accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and a private, residential, two-year or four-year, liberal arts may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12 (for CTE course)
  • Student in grades 11-12 (for academic course) (a 9th or 10th grade student may apply to enroll if, after all 11th and 12th grade students have applied for a course, additional students are necessary to offer the course)
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in Postsecondary Enrollment Options in grade 9 may not take more than the equivalent of four years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 10 may not take more than the equivalent of three years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. A district must provide information about the Postsecondary Enrollment Options program to all students in grades 8-11.

In addition, a postsecondary institution may provide information about its programs to a secondary school or to a student or parent and may advertise or otherwise recruit or solicit participation on educational and programmatic grounds only.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. To the extent possible, the school or district must provide counseling services to students and their parents before students enroll in courses, to ensure that the students and parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The school or district information must include who may enroll, what institutions and courses are eligible for participation, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by students and their parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate.

Prior to enrolling in a course, the student and the student's parent must sign a form stating that they have received the aforementioned information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The department must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school or district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. For a student earning both high school and postsecondary credit, or just high school credit, state (department of education). The state uses the following formula to reimburse colleges/universities: 88% of the product of the formula allowance minus $415, multiplied by 1.3 divided by 30 for schools on a semester calendar, and by 45 for schools on a quarter calendar. For a student taking a course for postsecondary credit only, or for any postsecondary courses in which a student is enrolled in addition to being enrolled full time in the student’s district: the student or parent is responsible for tuition, fees, textbooks, and materials.

An institution may not charge a student enrolled in a course for secondary and postsecondary credit for fees, textbooks, materials, support services, or other necessary costs, except for equipment purchased by the student that becomes the property of the student.
How state funds participating high schools Postsecondary Enrollment Options students are funded at a higher level. PSEO students are counted as 1.3 pupil units (1.2 pupil units effective fiscal year 2015 and later). Districts offering a concurrent enrollment course (taught at the high school by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member) are also eligible for an additional $150 per student, but only if the course is accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership, in the process of being accredited, or is shown by clear evidence to be of comparable standard to accredited courses, or is a technical course within a recognized career and technical education program of study approved by the commissioner of education and the chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities. The additional aid must be used to defray the cost of delivering the course at the high school.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Postsecondary institutions may be (but are not required to be) funded at a higher level for courses offered on the postsecondary campus. If a course is offered at a secondary school and taught by secondary teacher, the postsecondary system or institution must not require a payment from the school board that exceeds the cost to the postsecondary institution that is directly attributable to providing that course.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Postsecondary institutions are encouraged to apply for accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships. Districts may use the ≥2% of basic revenue they are required to reserve for staff development in order to pay for coursework and training leading to certification as a college in the schools or concurrent enrollment teacher. In order to receive a grant, the teacher must be enrolled in a program that includes coursework and training focused on teaching a core subject.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The commissioner of education must annually report to the education committees of the legislature the number of students enrolled in Postsecondary Enrollment Options in each school district, the number of teachers in each district attending training programs offered by Minnesota concurrent enrollment programs, recent trends in the field of postsecondary enrollment options, and expenditures for Postsecondary Enrollment Options.

In addition, when reporting student performance through the state accountability system, the commissioner of education must report a rigorous coursework measure indicating the number and percentage of high school graduates in the most recent school year who successfully completed one or more postsecondary enrollment options, including concurrent enrollment.
Program evaluation component Yes. The commissioner of education’s annual report to the education committees of the legislature must include any recommendations for Postsecondary Enrollment Options.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. However, the Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota must, and private nonprofit and proprietary postsecondary institutions should, award postsecondary credit for any courses in a program certified by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (this applies to courses taught at a high school and taught by either a secondary teacher or postsecondary faculty member).

Mississippi
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program A Dual Enrolled student is one enrolled in a community or junior college or state institution of higher learning while enrolled in high school. A Dual Credit student is one enrolled in a community or junior college or state institution of higher learning while enrolled in high school and who is receiving high school and college credit for postsecondary coursework.

“Dual enrolled” provisions also apply to dual credit students. Unless indicated otherwise, responses below refer to both dual enrollment and dual credit students.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program (may include eligible courses offered by the Mississippi On Line Learning Institute (MOLLI) or postsecondary institution such as the Mississippi Virtual Community College)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Yes, for dual credit students. Postsecondary credit only, for dual enrolled students.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Career and technical courses are eligible courses for dual credit. A dual credit career and technical education instructor must meet the requirements set forth by the State Board for Community and Junior Colleges in the qualifications manual for postsecondary career and technical personnel.

In addition, each district must offer a career track diploma option, in which students complete 21 credits comprising an academic core of courses and at least 4 credits in dual enrollment-dual credit CTE courses.
Unique characteristics Home-schooled students may also participate.

Any course that is required for subject area testing (i.e,. English II, Algebra I, Biology I, U.S. History) as a requirement for graduation from a public school in Mississippi is not eligible for dual credit. Courses eligible for dual credit include, but are not necessarily limited to, foreign languages, advanced math courses, advanced science courses, performing arts, advanced business and technology, and career and technical courses.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation (from high school principal and/or guidance counselor. A home-schooled student must have parent or custodian’s written recommendation)
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other: Students must have completed a minimum of 14 core high school units. An exemption may be provided students with a minimum ACT composite of at least 30 or the equivalent SAT score, and meet other requirements above.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. A qualified dually enrolled high school student must be allowed to earn an unlimited number of college or university credits for dual credit, provided the student earns a “B” average on the first two courses.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Both programs: Local decision. Tuition and other costs may be paid by the postsecondary institution, the school district, the student/parent, or by grants, foundations or other private or public sources.Tuition and costs for university-level courses must be paid from grants, foundations, or other private sources.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Course prerequisites must be the same for dual enrolled students as for regularly enrolled students at that university or community or junior college. All dual credit courses must meet the standards established at the postsecondary level. Dual credit memorandum of understandings must be established between each postsecondary institution and the school district implementing a dual credit program.

All dual credit academic instructors must have a master's degree with a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in their field of expertise. Dual credit career and technical education instructors must meet the requirements set forth by the State Board for Community and Junior Colleges in the qualifications manual for postsecondary Career and Technical personnel. A high school teacher must be approved as an instructor by the collaborating college or university. An instructor employed by the college or university must be approved by the collaborating school district. A dual credit academic instructor must meet the requirements set forth by the regional accrediting association (Southern Association of College and Schools). University and community and junior college personnel have the sole authority in the selection of dual credit instructors. 
Program reporting requirement Yes. The Children First annual report must include the percent of students dually enrolled. The report must be posted to Mississippi Department of Education website; each district must post a link to the Web site on the home page of the district Web site.
Program evaluation component Yes. The universities, community and junior colleges and the state department of education must periodically review their respective policies and assess the place of dual credit courses within the context of their traditional offerings.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Missouri
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program High schools may offer postsecondary course options to high school students. No title in statute; department of higher education policies refer to “dual credit.”
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. Students may complete vocational or academic courses.
Unique characteristics Students enrolled in courses taught at the high school by a high school teacher: Students in dual credit courses must have geographic access to student and academic support similar to the support students on the college campus have, including access to library resources of similar scope and magnitude as those available to students enrolled in courses with the same titles on the college campus. Library materials must be available either on site at the high school or electronically. Students must have reasonable access to the course instructor outside regular classroom hours either in person, via phone, and/or through other electronic means.

In addition, institutions are barred from using fees as a way of competing for dual credit students, and must work cooperatively when providing dual credit courses in the same geographic area. Institutions should use the same credit hour fee for all dual credit courses, regardless of course site.

One of the measures of K-12 district performance is whether the number of graduates who receive college credit through dual enrollment or approved dual credit courses meets or exceeds the state standard or demonstrates required improvement.

Hours of postsecondary credit earned through dual credit do not count against credit limits for eligibility for the A+ Scholarship.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, under “Resource Standards and Indicators” for public school districts, students must have access to postsecondary preparation (defined as Advanced Courses, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Technical Skills Attainment, Dual Enrollment, and Dual Credit).
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private colleges and universities may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other: If the high school administers a competency assessment in an area related to the dual credit course, high school juniors and seniors must score at or above proficient on the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) or earn an equivalent score on a comparable assessment.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for courses offered on high schools by high school faculty. Students must have geographic access to student and academic support similar to the support students on the college campus have.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Local agreement between student’s district and the college or university determines whether tuition is paid by the student’s district or by student/parent.

For the purpose of payment of dual credit course fees, eligible students must be enrolled in an approved course, and have either scored proficient or advanced on the same content area section of the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test. The department of elementary and secondary education must establish a systematic process for identification and reporting the names of students eligible for aid to pay a portion of the cost of dual credit course fees, and an evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the program and the program's impact on participating students.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for courses taught in high schools by high school teachers. Dual credit courses offered in high schools must duplicate the identical course offerings delivered on campus to matriculated students. Courses must be approved for dual credit status, and the credit awarded must be deemed acceptable in transfer by the faculty of the appropriate academic department of the college. Elements of the dual credit course to be approved by the on-campus college faculty in the appropriate academic discipline include the syllabus, textbook(s), teaching methodology, and student assessment strategies. Course content and course requirements must be comparable to those utilized in the equivalent on-campus courses with the same titles. The chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution will also be responsible for involving full time faculty in the discipline in the selection and evaluation of all dual credit faculty. The on-campus college faculty must also ensure comparable standards of evaluation.

Classes with a mixed population of dual credit and non-dual credit students must show evidence of collegiate level expectations for all students in the course. All high school students enrolled in a dual credit course must meet the same requirements for completion of the course, whether or not the student is simultaneously registered for college credit.

High school instructors must meet the same requirements for faculty teaching in institutions of higher education as required for accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission. They must have a master’s degree that includes 18 semester hours or more in the field in which they are teaching. However, institutions may use professional judgment in allowing faculty who do not meet all requirements for higher education instruction to teach dual credit courses, provided 90% of any institution’s dual credit faculty meet standard faculty eligibility requirements. Annual reports of student performance must be submitted to the chief academic officer for both review and consideration with respect to the continuation of a dual credit instructor.

New dual credit instructors must participate in orientation activities provided by the college and/or academic department. Continuing dual credit instructors must participate in the same professional development and evaluation activities as adjunct faculty on the college campus, with the recommendation for continuation being the responsibility of the campus academic department. College academic departments must provide instructors of dual credit courses with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty member to serve as a liaison. The institution of higher education must provide on-site supervision and evaluation of dual credit faculty. This process is best served when the instructional site is within a reasonable commuting distance from the institution of higher education. On-campus faculty are responsible for developing assessment and evaluation measures to ensure course quality and comparability. This comparability generally should be demonstrated by using the same assessment measures/testing procedures.

The postsecondary institution’s chief academic officer is accountable for ensuring the quality of all dual credit courses.
Program reporting requirement Yes, for courses taught at high schools by high school teachers. All institutions offering dual credit must annually report to the coordinating board for higher education (CBHE) the number of sections of dual credit courses offered; the number of students enrolled (duplicated headcount) per high school; the total by class (year in high school); the number of high schools served by dual credit and the number of sections in each; the student credit-hour production (total for all dual credit and total per high school); the number of sections offered in math, science, social sciences, and humanities; and summary data on the performance of dual credit students.

In addition, each institution must provide evidence that the guidelines for delivery of dual credit courses have been met (i.e., Student Eligibility, Program Structure and Administration, Faculty Qualifications and Support, Assessment of Student Performance, and Transferability of Credit.) The CBHE must annually provide the department of elementary and secondary education with an updated list of dual credit programs in compliance with these policies.
Program evaluation component Yes. The department of higher education’s committee on transfer and articulation (COTA) must review policy guidelines after three years based on institution reports and reports on the academic progress of students who transfer dual credit.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. A receiving institution must transfer and treat dual credit courses in the same way it would credit earned on the institution’s campus, provided this does not compromise the integrity of the associate degree or 42-hour general education block.

However, MDHE Dual Credit Policy suggest that students should expect to transfer credit up to the equivalent of five college courses. Students who wish to transfer more than five dual credit courses are encouraged to consult the institution to which they intend to transfer to determine if the institution has a policy regarding the use of dual credit courses to complete a college degree.

Montana
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has four programs: Running Start, Class 8 or Class B Alternative License, Concurrent Enrollment and Montana Digital Academy. Running Start allows high school students to take courses for dual credit or college credit at a postsecondary institution. Under Class 8 or Class B Alternative License, a dual credit course is taken at a postsecondary institution; course may or may not be during the school day. A course is offered by a faculty member with a Class 8 or Class B license. Concurrent enrollment courses are taught by high school faculty during the school day. The Montana Digital Academy offers a variety of courses, including dual credit courses.

Unless otherwise noted, all provisions refer to Running Start.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Concurrent Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Running Start, Class 8 or Class B Alternative License)
  • Virtual program (Montana Digital Academy, through the University of Montana system)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Running Start: Not specified. Interlocal agreement between district and postsecondary institution determines whether course is offered for dual credit or college credit.

Class 8 or Class B Alternative License: Both

Concurrent Enrollment: Both

Montana Digital Academy: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. A career/technical education faculty member who meets specified licensure requirements may teach a dual credit course in business education, industrial arts, marketing, technology education, or trade and industry.
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Running Start: Both. Tribal colleges may also participate.

Class 8 or Class B Alternative License and Concurrent Enrollment: Unclear

Montana Digital Academy: 2- and 4-year institutions
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Student must complete a Running Start application. The district must determine whether the student has the skills needed to succeed in the proposed college coursework.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Running Start: Local decision. Either the district or the student/parent, as determined by the interlocal agreement between the district and postsecondary institution. The agreement must also state the tuition level the postsecondary institution will charge for each credit. A student is responsible for book and all supplies costs.

Class 8 or Class B Alternative License: Student/parent

Concurrent Enrollment and Montana Digital Academy: Unclear
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Class B/Class 8 Alternative License: Yes. If a postsecondary faculty member is teaching a course for which students will receive high school and postsecondary credit, the faculty member must hold a class 8 dual credit license, valid for five years. To obtain the license, the faculty member must provide verification of faculty employment from the Chief Academic Officer or an appropriate official of the employing regionally accredited postsecondary institution that the class 8 licensure applicant meets the requirements of “dual credit-only postsecondary faculty” above. The faculty member must also provide a recommendation from an official from a Montana or NCATE accredited professional educator preparation program stating the applicant has earned a major or minor (or equivalent) in an endorsable teaching area, the applicant has demonstrated competency by meeting criteria set forth in a rubric developed and published by the superintendent of public instruction in consultation with K-12 education and higher education, and has complied with specified nonacademic requirements for licensure.

Concurrent Enrollment: Yes. High school faculty must be approved by the postsecondary institution. (Mont.Admin.R. 10.55.602(13)(c)
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Nebraska
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program For purposes of the Educational Service Units Act, a dual-enrollment course is defined as a course taught to students for credit at both a high school and a postsecondary educational institution.
Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program. For purposes of the Educational Service Units Act, a distance education course includes a dual-enrollment course with at least one student who is in a different location than the teacher and taught by a high school or postsecondary instructor using either two-way interactive video or the Internet without two-way interactive video.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual credit: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics One of the statutory duties of the Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education is to encourage the interaction of public institutions with K-12 schools to facilitate joint planning initiatives on matters such as class or credit agreements for high school students enrolling in college-level programs.

The Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, direct districts and institutions to "work together to ensure broad access to dual enrollment courses for all students, irrespective of the students’ financial resources. Postsecondary education institutions are encouraged to offer tuition remissions or find other means of support for eligible students qualifying for free or reduced lunches or otherwise demonstrating financial need. "School districts that receive state aid related in part to significant numbers of students challenged by poverty or English language limitations should consider using such aid or finding other means of support to fund the tuition expenses of eligible students who would not otherwise be able to enroll in dual enrollment courses."
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Nonprofit private postsecondary educational institutions may also offer distance education dual enrollment courses.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Not set in state policy

The Access College Early Scholarship Program provides low-income students with financial assistance for courses taken in high school for postsecondary credit.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. A dual credit teaching certificate is available to allow college faculty to teach courses offered by the institution and approved by a local school system for high school credit. Each applicant for the certificate must meet specified requirements for a general teaching certificate, be eligible to teach courses for college credit as documented by the employing college's submission of the Postsecondary Verification Form, hold a master’s degree, and earned at least 6 graduate hours in the subject area for which a teaching endorsement is sought. Regulations also specify certificate renewal requirements.

In addition, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, specify:

(1) Instructors must hold a master's degree and "have the mutual support of the district and college/university participating in the dual enrollment program."
(2) High school and postsecondary faculty must "receive appropriate orientation and training[.]"
(3) "Collaboration between high school and postsecondary faculty is encouraged and faculty development is available where appropriate."
(4) "High school and postsecondary faculty maintain contact throughout the program. In some instances, this contact is facilitated by technology."

Furthermore, "Course outlines or syllabi (including at minimum a description of content, teaching strategies, performance measures, grading standards, resource materials, objectives/outcomes, and course calendar) utilized in the program meet district(s), state, and college/university standards."
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy. However, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, specify that: (1) The district(s) and postsecondary institution should annually review the program. (2) Program participants should be "tracked following graduation through postsecondary experiences when possible. Tracking elements may include district(s) data (e.g., class rank, GPA, ACT where available, AP exam where available and appropriate, and course outcomes and grade) and postsecondary data (e.g., GPA, major, number of hours completed, and enhancements, if appropriate to program)."
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Nevada
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. Students in grades 11 and 12 who complete a course at a community college or university must be allowed to apply the credit toward completion of high school graduation requirements.
Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy. In practice, the state has not allowed dual credit for courses that would be considered developmental or remedial. Courses below 100 are not included on the lists of courses forwarded to the state board for inclusion on the approved list.
CTE component Yes. Local boards and the governing board of each charter school must specify the postsecondary courses, including occupational courses, for which credits may be applied toward high school graduation. In addition, board of regents policies specify an 11th or 12th grader identified as Vocational Program Completers may be admitted and enroll in three or more credits per semester, based on written, articulated program agreements with designated school districts. For these students only, college credit may also be given for CTE courses completed in grades 9 and 10.
Unique characteristics A student enrolled in a program to complete an adult standard diploma may also apply postsecondary credits toward receipt of an adult standard diploma. Homeschooled students may enroll subject to case-by-case approvals by institution officials.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. Approval of appropriate institution officials.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Each college must establish procedures and requirements for admission of students without a high school diploma. Each college or university may establish performance or testing standards to determine readiness for enrollment or admission when other admission or enrollment criteria are not met.
  • Student in grades 11-12
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. However, each 9th grader must develop a 4-year academic plan that sets forth the education goals the student intends to achieve. The plan may include enrollment in dual credit courses. Local policies may ensure that each 9th grader and his/her parent are provided with information on dual credit courses.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent
How state funds participating high schools Not defined
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not applicable--courses are offered at the postsecondary institution or online.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes

New Hampshire
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place No
Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in New Hampshire, dual enrollment is offered through the Community College System of New Hampshire and Southern New Hampshire University.
Where courses provided Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary No state policy
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition There is no formal dual enrollment policy, so tuition is the responsibility of the student or the student's parent.
How state funds participating high schools Reduced funding for dual enrollment students
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Dual enrollment students are funded at a higher level
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

New Jersey
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. Districts and postsecondary institutions may create partnerships in which college courses are offered to high school students on postsecondary campuses and in high schools.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. “Program of study” for purposes of CTE regulations includes opportunities for participation in dual- or concurrent-enrollment programs, or acquisition of postsecondary credit in other ways.
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, the program must seek the involvement of all institutions of higher education, two-year and four-year, public and nonpublic, and all districts, including those not in close proximity to an appropriate institution of higher education.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Nonpublic two- and four-year institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified. Local boards determine student eligibility.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Not set in state policy. However, state procedures must ensure that no academically eligible student may be excluded from participation in college courses offered on high school campuses because of inability to pay.
How state funds participating high schools Not specified
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. District boards and partner colleges must ensure that courses are equivalent to those offered to regularly admitted college students, and are taught by college faculty with academic rank. Adjunct faculty and members of the district staff who have a minimum of a master's degree may also be included.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes

New Mexico
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Credit
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other. At "off-campus centers"
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Students may take career-technical courses.
Unique characteristics  All high school graduates must complete one unit either as an Advanced Placement or honors course, a dual credit course, or a distance learning course.

Private school, home school and bureau of Indian education high school students may participate in dual credit courses. Private school and home school students must pay the full cost of dual credit courses.

District partners must provide appropriate accommodations and services for special education students while the students are enrolled in dual credit classes, including academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services for eligible students across educational activities and settings (e.g. equipping school computers with screen-reading, voice recognition or other adaptive hardware or software and providing note-takers, recording devices, or sign language interpreters, or other adaptation as required by law). Districts must also inform students in need of accommodations or other arrangements of the need to speak directly with the disabilities coordinator at the postsecondary institution.

High school students must be allowed use of the postsecondary institution library, course-related labs and other instructional facilities, use of the postsecondary institution programs and services such as counseling, tutoring, advising, and special services for students with disabilities, and access to postsecondary institution personnel and resources as required.

The student's district, charter school, state-supported school or bureau of Indian education high school must pay for required textbooks and other course supplies through purchase agreements with the postsecondary institution/tribal college bookstore or through other cost-efficient methods. The student must return textbooks and unused course supplies to the district or K-12 school when the student completes or withdraws from the course. Postsecondary institutions must make every effort to adopt textbooks for at least three years.

The "dual credit council" is a six-member advisory group consisting of public education department and higher education department staff appointed by the cabinet secretaries of the higher education department and the public education department. The council issues recommendations to the cabinet secretaries of the public education and higher education departments on dual credit issues outside the scope of an LEA/institution's dual credit master agreement. Postsecondary institutions and LEAs have the right to appeal to the dual credit council on issues related to implementing the dual credit program, agreement, and rules.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Accredited tribal colleges may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Postsecondary institutions must provide course placement evaluation and consider a high school college readiness assessment to verify a student's academic skill level and ensure compliance with course prerequisites.
  • Other. Parental permission. Student must also be enrolled one-half or more of the minimum course requirements approved by the public education department for public school students (enrolled at least half-time in high school courses), or be in physical attendance at a bureau of Indian education-funded high school at least three documented contact hours per day. Students must also discuss potential dual credit courses with appropriate LEA and institutional staff (see "unique characteristics" for more details).
  • Not specified. The agreement between the district and postsecondary partner must specify the required academic standing of students eligible to participate in the dual credit program. LEAs must employ a method of qualifying students for dual credit participation based on factors which may include academic performance review, use of next step plan, assessments, advisement and career guidance, and recommend enrollment at the postsecondary institution with evidence that the student has the appropriate skills and maturity to benefit from dual credit instruction. Postsecondary institutions must employ a method of qualifying students for dual credit that demonstrates the student has the appropriate skills and maturity to benefit from the instruction requested. Students have the right to appeal to the LEA or postsecondary institution any decision regarding enrollment in the dual credit program. Postsecondary institutions and LEAs must have a student appeals process for student enrollment in dual credit programs (the decision of the institution or LEA to which the student appeals is final).
Cap on number of credits students may earn No. A high school student may enroll in as many colleges courses as he/she wishes during a fall, spring or summer semester, provided the student's schedule is at least half comprised of public education department (PED)-approved high school courses.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must ensure that each high school student, in developing a "next-step plan", is "reasonably informed about" curricular options, including dual credit courses. Each student's next-step plan, developed in grade 8 and annually updated, must include one or more of the following: Advanced Placement, honors, dual credit, distance learning, career-technical courses, or pre-apprenticeship programs. Districts must provide information and orientation to students about opportunities to participate in dual credit programs during student advisement, academic support and formulation of annual next step plans.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. Postsecondary and district partners in dual credit agreements must collaborate to provide information and orientation to the student and parent on the responsibilities of dual credit enrollment, including academic rigor, time commitments, and behavioral expectations associated with taking college courses and the importance of satisfactorily completing the postsecondary institution credits attempted in order for dual credit to be awarded. Postsecondary and district partners must also inform students of course requirement information, including course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements, performance standards, and other related course information.

Students are required to discuss potential dual credit courses with the appropriate LEA and postsecondary institution staff, including institution admission and registration requirements, course requirements, credits to be attempted, credits to be awarded, scheduling under dual credit, and implications for failure to successfully complete the course.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition State. The higher education institution must waive tuition and general fees for dual credit students (students are responsible for course-specific fees, i.e., lab, computer fees). The funding formula in place to allocate funds to the public institutions of higher education bases the allocation on the number of credit hours completed and reported to the higher education department. There is a lag of a year or more because the funds are allocated during the January-February legislative session.

The tribal college dual credit program fund consists of legislative appropriations; grants, gifts, donations, and bequests for the dual credit program; and earnings on monies in the fund. Funds may be used only by the higher education department to compensate tribal colleges for tuition and fees waived to allow high school students to attend classes on the college campus or electronically.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. The postsecondary partner must approve faculty for all dual credit courses. Each district offering dual credit courses must submit a signed uniform master agreement with a public postsecondary institution to the public education department. The agreement must specify eligible courses, academic quality of dual credit courses, course approval and course requirements.

College courses eligible for dual credit must meet the rigor for postsecondary institution credit and be congruent with the postsecondary institution's academic standards. Dual credit courses offered at high schools must conform to college academic standards. Course requirements for high school students enrolled in dual credit courses must be equal to those of regular college students.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Districts must annually report to the public education department and postsecondary institutions must report to the higher education department:
  • The number of students enrolled in dual credit classes
  • The courses taken and
  • Grades earned by each dual credit student.
The public education department must annually report to the legislature high school graduation rates for dual credit students. The higher education department must report to the legislature on the New Mexico postsecondary institutions dual credit students ultimately attend. The higher education department and the public education department must annually report to the legislature the estimated cost of providing the statewide dual credit program, including tuition, fees, textbooks and course supplies.
Program evaluation component Yes. The higher education department and the public education department must evaluate the dual credit program in terms of its accessibility to students statewide and its effect on:
  • Student achievement in secondary education
  • Student enrollment and completion of higher education
  • School districts, charter schools, state-supported schools, bureau of Indian education high schools, and public postsecondary educational institutions, and tribal colleges.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Any course in the general education core may be offered for dual credit. Dual credit courses in the general education core must be transferable to any institution, and must count as fulfilling a required lower-division course.

New York
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place No
Definition or title of program While there is no statewide policy in New York, dual enrollment is offered on an institutional basis.
Where courses provided Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Not set in state policy
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary No state policy
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Not set in state policy
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition There is no formal dual enrollment policy, so tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. If dual enrollment students attend their high school full-time, they are funded at the same level as traditional students. However, if they are absent during the school day to attend dual enrollment classes, they may be counted as part-time students.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear

North Carolina
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program The Career and College Promise program provides opportunities for students to pursue (1) a Career Technical Education Pathway, leading to a certificate or diploma aligned with one or more high school Tech Prep Career Clusters, and (2) a College Transfer Pathway, leading to a college transfer certificate requiring the successful completion of 30 semester hours of transfer courses, including English and math.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Postsecondary credit. High school credit may be earned for some CTE and College Transfer courses.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes, through the Gateway to College Program. While Gateway to College is a national program, statute directs the state board of community colleges to permit high school students enrolled in Gateway to College programs to enroll in developmental courses based on an assessment of their individual student needs by a high school and community college staff team and (ii) include this coursework in computing the budget FTE for the colleges.
CTE component Yes. The Career and College Promise program allows community colleges to offer a Career Technical Education Pathway, leading to a certificate or diploma aligned with one or more high school Tech Prep Career Clusters.
Unique characteristics Home school and private school students may also participate.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Two-year
Student eligibility requirements
  • Minimum GPA. For Career Technical Pathway, minimum 3.0 GPA on 4.0 scale OR upon principal recommendation. For College Transfer Pathway, minimum 3.0 GPA on 4.0 scale.
  • Written approval/recommendation. Principal recommendation ONLY for Career Technical Pathway student with GPA below 3.0.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. For Career Technical Pathway students: Meet course prerequisites.
  • Student in grades 11-12. However, recent changes allow students in grades 9-10 to enroll in technology and engineering programs.
  • Other. For College Transfer Pathway, students who have demonstrated college readiness on an approved assessment (State has set college-readiness benchmarks on PLAN, PSAT, Assets, COMPASS, Accuplacer. Colleges may alternatively use minimum scores on SAT and/or ACT to demonstrate readiness in English, Critical Reading, and Mathematics.)
For the College Transfer pathway, an 11th or 12th grader may qualify under "Provisional Eligibility Criteria" that include 3.5 GPA on a 4.0 scale, 2 years high school Engilsh and Algebra II with "C" or higher, and permission of principal and community college president. A student participating through Provisional Eligibility Criteria may enroll only in English and math courses until s/he demonstrates college readiness by completing a college course with a "C" or higher.

To maintain eligibility, participants must maintain a GPA of 2.0 on college courses in a program of study and continue to make progress toward high school graduation.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy. Advising is primarily the high school’s responsibility.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition State. The general assembly reimburses FTE costs to the community college system based on participation reports. However, state funds are not available to cover textbooks or fees. Fees are not waived unless the community college chooses to do so. The LEA and community college determine how to pay for textbooks, and whether/how student fees will be paid.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not applicable--all Career and College Promise courses are taught by community college faculty.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The Community Colleges System Office must report to the Joint Education Oversight Committee or, if the General Assembly is in session, to the House and Senate Education Committees no later than February 1 regarding the number and cost of high school FTE served as a result of the Career and College Promise program.
Program evaluation component Yes. The North Carolina Community College System and the department of public instruction must jointly develop and implement a program accountability plan to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes for Career and College Promise. Outcomes to be measured must include:
  • The impact of dual enrollment on high school completion
  • The academic achievement and performance of dually enrolled high school students
  • The number of students who successfully complete college certificates while dually enrolled
  • The impact of dual enrollment and certificate completion on enrollment in college
  • The persistence and completion rates of students who continue into college programs after high school graduation
  • The academic achievement and performance of students who continue into college programs after high school graduation.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. 2011 legislation directs the North Carolina Community College System, University of North Carolina (UNC) General Administration, and the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities to develop a plan for articulation of a college transfer certificate to all UNC institutions and participating independent colleges and universities. North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities, Inc., must also be included in the development of the plan if it chooses to participate. College transfer certificates must require the successful completion of 30 credit hours of college transfer courses, including English and math, for qualified high school juniors and seniors.

North Dakota
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Postsecondary Enrollment Options Program
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. Students may receive dual credit for completing a CTE course offered by a postsecondary institution in a program accredited by a national or regional accrediting organization recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
Unique characteristics Nonpublic high schools may also participate in dual credit opportunities.

High school students enrolled in dual-credit college courses and seeking NDUS college credit regardless of class location are permitted to use the college/university’s resources, i.e., computer labs, library, etc., as any part-time student would.

Regulations task the school approval and accreditation unit in the department of public instruction with providing technical assistance on dual credit.

Counselors at participating high schools must be informed annually of the current/tuition fee amounts charged by their service-area NDUS schools.

To be eligible for a North Dakota Academic Scholarship, a student must complete either one-half unit of a specified curriculum through a dual enrollment course, or one unit through an Advanced Placement course.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, in order to be approved every public and nonpublic high school must make available at least one Advanced Placement or dual credit course.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Other postsecondary institutions accredited by a recognized regional or national accrediting organization are also eligible to participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 10-12
  • Written approval/recommendation. From district superintendent
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Other. Parent permission
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent.  Student or parent also responsible for all fees, textbooks, materials, equipment, and other necessary charges related to the course in which the student has enrolled.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. According to North Dakota University System (NDUS) procedures, "The college course section taught in the high school must meet the content and academic standards of the NDUS course sections taught on campus. ... To ensure that college course standards are adhered to, the NDUS college/university course syllabus will be provided to the [high school] instructor and be used as the criteria and model for all such dual-credit college courses taught in the high school. In most cases, this will mean the use of the same (or equivalent) text materials and similar evaluation criteria to include institutional exams if need be." The postsecondary institution must monitor the course, including by "using the sponsoring college/university student evaluation document and procedure in order to solicit student feed-back."

See also the "Instructor Approval" portion of the North Dakota University System Procedures 402.3.2, Delivery of Dual-Credit College Courses.
Program reporting requirement No. However, each institution must maintain data on students attempting and earning articulation credits, by course and by student.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. All dual-credit courses have equal transferability status within the North Dakota University System in accordance with the General Education Requirement Transfer Agreement (GERTA) and other transfer agreements.

Ohio
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment includes the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, Advanced Placement courses, early college high schools, and any similar program established pursuant to an agreement between a school district or nonpublic high school and an institution of higher education.

Unless otherwise indicated, all policies refer to Post-Secondary Enrollment Options.
Where courses provided
  • Not specified
  • Virtual program. The chancellor of the board of regents may determine the manner in which a course included in the board of regents’ clearinghouse of digital texts, interactive distance learning courses, and other distance learning courses may be offered as a dual enrollment program.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. Students elect at the time of course enrollment whether to take the course for college credit only, for high school credit only, or for high school and college credit.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes. However, students/parents must bear the cost of tuition and all other expenses for remedial courses taken by a student at a college or university. Participation in remedial courses is not reflected in district and school public accountability report cards.
CTE component Yes. Each joint vocational school district must offer the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, and at least one dual enrollment program. In addition, each district and building’s public accountability report card must include the number of district or building students who have earned at least three college credits through state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation.
Unique characteristics Nonpublic high schools must provide students with the opportunity to participate in the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program, including Seniors to Sophomores, or a dual enrollment program. Homeschooled students may participate in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. The state provides a base amount of $1 million dollars to cover the cost of nonpublic school student participation in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. If the department of education receives a request for program participation after exceeding that amount, the department, within one week of the receipt of such application, notify the applicant, the applicant's nonpublic school, and the college accepting the applicant (and all subsequent applicants, their nonpublic schools, and colleges accepting them) that funds will not be available for the applicant's participation in the program during the year for which the application was made.

Effective with the 2014-15 academic year, state universities (with exceptions) may permit state residents who first entered grade 9 in the 2010-11 school year to begin undergraduate coursework if the individual completed the Ohio core high school graduation requirements. However, a student who completed at least 10 semester hours or the equivalent at another public postsecondary institution other than a state university in credit-bearing college courses is exempt from this admissions requirement.

Statute provides for the enrollment (or discontinued enrollment) and funding provisions relative to a student who is expelled while participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options.

A college must give priority to its other students regarding enrollment in courses. However, once a student has been accepted in a course as a participant, the institution may not displace the participant for another student.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. Each city, local, exempted village, joint vocational school district and chartered nonpublic high school must provide students in grades 9-12 with the opportunity to participate in a dual enrollment program (i.e., Advanced Placement, early college high school, Post-Secondary Enrollment Options, and any similar program established pursuant to an agreement between a school district or nonpublic high school and an institution of higher education). However, postsecondary institutions are not required to accept eligible students.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private and for-profit two- and four-year institutions may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student participation in the program must be based solely on a college’s established placement standards for credit-bearing courses.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. However, a student first enrolling in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options in grade 9 may not take more than the equivalent of four years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 10 may not take more than the equivalent of three years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Each district, community school (charter school), and nonpublic high school must provide information to all students in grades 8-11 about the dual enrollment programs the district or school offers. Information provided must include (1) program eligibility, including freshman status as locally determined, and acceptance by college, and (2) program options, including enrollment in college courses for college credit, or both high school graduation and college credit, and financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials, and fees for each option.

Each district, community school, and nonpublic high school must document the method by which the notification was made with an underlying purpose and intent to ensure each student eligible for the program is aware of the program and the student's opportunity to participate.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes, for Post-Secondary Enrollment Options. School districts and participating community schools (charter schools) and nonpublic schools must provide counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents before students participate, to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the advantages, possible risks and consequences of participation. Counseling information must include:
  • Program eligibility, including freshman status as locally determined, and acceptance by college
  • Options as to whether the student/parent will
    • bear tuition and other fees and earn college credit only, or high school and college credit
    • have the college reimbursed by the department of education or an alternative funding agreement between the district and institution, and receive high school and college credit
  • Financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials, and fees
  • The process for granting academic credits
  • Criteria for any transportation aid
  • Available support services
  • Scheduling
  • The consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls and the effect of the grade attained in the course being included in the student's grade point average, if applicable
  • The effect of program participation on the student's ability to complete the district's, community school's, or nonpublic school's graduation requirements
  • The academic and social responsibilities of students and parents under the program
  • Information about and encouragement to use the counseling services of the college in which the student intends to enroll
  • Information confirming that the student can take college courses at no cost
  • Encouragement to all students who have the ability to undertake college work, especially gifted students, to seriously consider the program
  • That students participating in the program may enroll in more than one college.
Nonpublic school counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents regarding Post-Secondary Enrollment Options must also include an explanation that funding may be limited and that not all nonpublic students who wish to participate may be able to do so.

The school district, community school, or nonpublic school must document that the student and parent received the aforementioned counseling, and that they understand the responsibilities the student and the student's parent must assume in the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options program. The district, community school or participating nonpublic school must maintain documentation of the counseling required.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Post-Secondary Enrollment Options: Local decision. Public school students may elect:
  • To be responsible for all tuition and the cost of all textbooks, materials, and fees. A student choosing this option elects, at the time of enrollment, to receive only college credit or high school and college credit.
  • For the department of education to reimburse the college, or for the district, community school, STEM school to enter into an agreement for an alternate method to calculate or transmit the amount the institution would be paid for a participating student. However, the department of education will not reimburse a college for a remedial college course (costs borne by student/parent). These options are not available to the student if the student is enrolled full-time in the student's district, community school, STEM school, or nonpublic school.
No school district may charge a student an additional fee or tuition for participation in any dual enrollment program. A postsecondary institution must furnish all textbooks and materials for a course (and may not charge the student for tuition or fees) if the department of education reimburses the institution for the course.

However, if a student earns a nonpassing grade, the district superintendent or head of the community school or STEM school must seek reimbursement from the participant/participant's parent for the amount of state funds paid to the college on behalf of the participant for that college course.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. If a public school Post-Secondary Enrollment Options student elects to pay his/her tuition and other course costs, the school district’s formula ADM reflects that the participant is not enrolled in school anywhere (school receives less than full ADM). If the student elects for the department of education to reimburse the college (only for credit-bearing courses) or to enter into an agreement using an alternate funding formula to calculate or transmit the amount the institution would be paid for a participating student, the district is funded at the same level as it would be for a traditional high school student. The student must bear tuition and other course costs if the student is enrolled as a full-time student in the student's district, community school, STEM school, or nonpublic school.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. The institution receives from the state the lesser of:
  • College tuition base multiplied by the participant's full-time equivalency percentage; or
  • Actual costs that would have been the participant’s responsibility if s/he had enrolled in the college as a postsecondary student independent of the postsecondary enrollment options program multiplied by the participant's full-time equivalency percentage.
The state does not reimburse colleges for remedial courses taken by a secondary school student.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Post-Secondary Enrollment Options students are expected and required to perform at the same level as the college’s regular students.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The chancellor of the board of regents must annually submit a report to the governor and general assembly a report that includes a description of dual enrollment programs offered by school districts, community schools (charter schools), STEM schools, college-preparatory boarding schools, and nonpublic high schools, and post the information on the chancellor’s website. (R.C. § 3333.041(4)) The department of education must also annually compile a list of all institutions participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options or another dual enrollment program, and distribute to all school districts, community schools, STEM schools, and nonpublic schools.

In addition, while not a “graded” measure for purposes of district or school accountability, a district or building’s public accountability report card must include the number of district or building students who have earned at least three college credits through dual enrollment programs, such as Post-Secondary Enrollment Options and state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Ohio's public two- and four-year colleges and universities must accept transfer credit for successfully completed (as defined in transfer policy), college-level courses from Ohio institutions of higher education which are accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Higher Learning Commission or other regional accrediting commissions which have been recognized by the Council On Higher Education Accreditation.

Oklahoma
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Technology center school districts may offer programs designed in cooperation with institutions of higher education that have an emphasis on a focused field of career study, upon approval of the state board and the local board. Students in the 10th grade may be allowed to attend these programs for up to 1/2 of a school day and graduation credit must be given if the courses are taught by a teacher certified in the secondary subject area.
Unique characteristics Accredited private school and home school students may also participate. If a private school is not accredited, students may be admitted under special provisions set forth in state regents policy.

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, in cooperation with the State Board of Education, must actively encourage the concurrent enrollment of high school students of exceptional ability. Providing concurrent enrollment opportunities for area high school students is listed among the general functions of branch campuses.

Tuition waivers for eligible seniors must be granted without any limitation on the number of waivers granted in any year other than the amount of funds available for the program and the number of eligible applicants. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education must establish criteria for prioritizing applicants on the basis of need, timeliness of application, or other factors as determined by the state regents.

In calculating a high school’s grade for public accountability purposes, 1 bonus point is awarded each high school that achieves either a student participation rate of 70% or higher in accelerated coursework or a student performance rate of 90% or higher in accelerated coursework, including concurrent enrollment. For concurrent enrollment performance rate, successful completion is defined as a passing grade of "C" or higher.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. All students must have a letter of recommendation from their counselor, and a signed statement from the high school principal stating they are eligible to satisfy requirements for high school graduation no later than spring of senior year.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Students may only enroll in curricular areas where they have met the ACT assessment requirements for college placement as stated in the State Regents’ Assessment Policy. Institutions will use established ACT scores at or above the State Regents’ established minimums in the four subject areas of science, mathematics, reading and English. A student scoring below the established ACT score in reading is not permitted to enroll in any other collegiate course (outside science, math, and English).
High school seniors and juniors are held to different standards that take into account either ACT/SAT scores OR high school GPA and class rank. Differential benchmarks on all indicators are set for seniors vs. juniors, and for research universities vs. regional universities vs. community colleges. University of Oklahoma (OU) and Oklahoma State University (OSU) are authorized to set higher standards for 12th grade students. Home schooled students and students from unaccredited high schools must simply meet ACT/SAT benchmarks and be 16 or 17 years old.

No public institution may deny concurrent enrollment to any high school student, or student of at least 13 years of age who is receiving high-school-level instruction at home, who meets eligibility requirements, nor may any independent school district prohibit any student who meets eligibility requirements from participating.

A student may continue concurrent enrollment if the student maintains a minimum 2.0 GPA in college courses.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No absolute number of postsecondary credits — either per semester or during a student's high school career — but the total number of high school and college courses a student is taking in a given semester may not equal more than 19 semester credit hours. For purposes of this calculation, one semester high school course is equivalent to three postsecondary credit hours. However, students wishing to go beyond this limit may petition the institution.

Tuition waivers for seniors are limited to a maximum of 6 credit hours per semester.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. The state board and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are required to prepare promotional materials explaining the requirements, features and opportunities of concurrent enrollment and ensure that districts distribute the materials to each student prior to enrollment for each year of high school.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. The college should provide appropriate academic advising prior to and continuing throughout a student’s enrollment.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student/parent, unless the district does not offer enough course selections to allow the student to receive the courses needed to meet the graduation requirements, in which case the district pays tuition, fees, and books for the concurrent enrollment course, and provides transportation.

High school seniors who meet the eligibility requirements for concurrent enrollment are entitled to receive a tuition waiver for a maximum of 6 credit hours per semester. Students receiving a waiver are responsible for fees, books, and supplies.

Statute expresses legislative intent that, for concurrent enrollment courses the district is paying for, the institution charge only the supplementary and special service fees that are directly related to the concurrent enrollment course and enrollment procedures for that student, and that fees for student activities and student service facilities, including the student health care and cultural and recreational service fees, not be charged to such students.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Courses at an off-campus site are taught by regular faculty whose primary educational employment is as a faculty member at the institution delivering the course. Exceptions may be made upon request to the Chancellor. “Regular faculty” is defined as a person qualified for appointment to the full-time faculty of the institution proposing to award credit. All appointments must be recommended by the academic unit awarding the credit.

The department of education must work with school districts in reviewing and approving certain courses taught by districts, including concurrent enrollment courses.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. The State System has a course equivalency matrix that allows students to see how a course will transfer among institutions. The institutions are committed to honoring this agreement.

Oregon
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has multiple programs. "Accelerated college credit programs” include Dual Credit, Expanded Options, Two-plus-Two (CTE), Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs. Dual credit means awarding secondary and postsecondary credit for a course offered in a high school during regular school hours.

Each district must either provide students in grades 9-12 with accelerated college credit programs related to English, math and science, or ensure students have online access to accelerated college credit programs in these subjects.

Unless otherwise noted, policies in this profile refer to the Expanded Options Program or the Dual Credit program.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Dual Credit program)
  • At postsecondary institution (Expanded Options program)
  • Virtual program (Both programs)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes. A district must enter into an agreement with a postsecondary institution that accepts a student for enrollment in a noncredit course.
CTE component Oregon Administrative Rule sets policy for accelerated college credit programs including the “Two-plus-Two” professional technical programs articulated between high schools and community colleges. In addition, eligible courses as defined for the Expanded Options program include courses in career and technical education. 
Unique characteristics Expanded Options: One of the purposes of the Expanded Options Program is to “Increase the number of at-risk students earning college credits or preparing to enroll in post-secondary institutions.” “At-risk student” is defined for these purposes as student who qualifies for free-/reduced-price lunch or as defined by rules adopted by the board if the board has adopted rules to define an at-risk student.

The student’s resident school district must provide any required special education and related services to a student participating in the Expanded Options Program. A post-secondary institution that intends to provide special education and related services to a student in the Expanded Options Program must enter into a contract with the student’s resident school district; this contact must include components set forth in statute.

A district may request a waiver from the department of education from the requirements of the Expanded Options Program. The department must grant the waiver if compliance with program requirements would adversely impact district finances, or does all of the following:
  • Offers a dual credit program, a Two-plus-Two program, an Advanced Placement program, an International Baccalaureate program or any other accelerated college credit program
  • Ensures that at-risk students who participate in the accelerated college credit programs are not required to make any payments for participation in the programs; and
  • Has a process for program participation that allows either all eligible at-risk students to participate, all at-risk students to earn the number of credit hours established in the state board’s credit cap, or allows for an increasing number of at-risk students to participate each school year based on demand and appropriateness, as determined by a district plan.
Dual Credit: The department of education must administer a grant program that provides grants to provide classroom supplies for accelerated college credit programs (i.e., dual credit programs, Two-plus-Two programs, Advanced Placement programs and International Baccalaureate programs).

Statute establishes the Accelerated College Credit Account in the State Treasury, separate from the General Fund. Moneys in the Accelerated College Credit Account are continuously appropriated to the Department of Education for grants to applicant districts, community college districts or state institutions of higher education to provide training to current or future teachers of accelerated college credit courses, provide classroom supplies for such courses, and assist students in paying for books, materials and other costs, other than test fees, related to accelerated college credit programs. Grants may be funds from the Accelerated College Credit Account, or federal funds, or from any other source, public or private.

2013 legislation directs the Oregon Education Investment Board to establish the Guidance and Support for Post-Secondary Aspirations Program, intended in part to increase the number of students who earn a high school diploma and enroll in postsecondary education. To accomplish the purposes of the Guidance and Support for Post-Secondary Aspirations Program, moneys must be distributed to the department of education to create a scholarship fund aimed at increasing access for underserved students to post-secondary institutions by paying for first-year college courses or accelerated college credit programs.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Both programs: Not specified. All school districts are required to provide the opportunity for Accelerated College Credit (i.e., Dual Credit, Expanded Options, Two-plus-Two, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate). Every community college district must make at least one Accelerated College Credit program available to each interested school district within the community college district boundaries.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution (both programs)
  • Other: Expanded Options: A student who has completed course requirements for graduation but who has not received a diploma. The student must be enrolled in an Oregon high school, in grade 11-12 or at least 16 years old at the time of enrollment, and have an educational learning plan.
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student. However, a student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually notify all high school students and their parents of the Expanded Options Program for the following school year. Each school district must establish a process to ensure that all at-risk students and their parents are notified about the Expanded Options Program. Districts must establish a process to identify students who have dropped out and make it a priority to provide these dropouts with information about the Expanded Options Program. Districts must send information about the program to the last known address of the student's family. (O.R.S. § 340.020) Districts must also notify students who transfer into the district after the notification date, or return to high school after dropping out. 

The notification must include information about: 
  • Financial arrangements for tuition, textbooks, equipment and materials
  • Available transportation services
  • The effect of enrolling in the Expanded Options Program on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements
  • The consequences of failing or not completing an eligible post-secondary course
  • The requirement that participation in the Expanded Options Program is contingent on acceptance by an eligible post-secondary institution
  • School district timelines affecting student eligibility and duplicate course determinations.
Administrative code identifies additional elements the notice must include.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Expanded Options: Yes. Prior to an eligible student beginning an eligible postsecondary course, the district must notify the student of the number and type of credits the student will be granted upon successful completion of the course. If there is a dispute between the district and the eligible student regarding the number or type of credits the district will grant or that the district has granted for a particular eligible postsecondary course, the student may appeal the district's decision using an appeals process adopted by the district board.

Dual Credit: In accordance with the Oregon Dual Credit Standards, postsecondary institutions must outline specific course requirements and prerequisites for dual credit programs. They must also provide high school students with a student guide that outlines students’ responsibilities as well as guidelines for the transfer of credit.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Tuition and/or fee payment varies based upon the program and courses offered. 

Dual Credit: State. The legislature appropriates funds to reimburse FTE costs to institutions based on participation reports; these funds are distributed by the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development. Local decision as to whether students are charged registration/transcription fees.

Expanded Options: Local decision.  Expanded Options programs were developed to ensure “at-risk” student participation in Accelerated College Credit Programs are provided at no cost to the student. Tuition and fees are negotiated between the school district and the postsecondary institution to pay required instructional costs of the student. A student may apply to the resident district for reimbursement for any textbooks, fees, equipment or materials required for a postsecondary course. A postsecondary institution that receives payment through the negotiated financial agreement may not charge a student for tuition, fees and other required instructional costs associated with the student’s enrollment in a course. 

A charter school that elects to participate in the Expanded Options Program must negotiate and pay actual instructional costs associated with student participation directly to the postsecondary institution. 
 
Accelerated College Credit Program Grant: The department of education must administer a grant program that provides grants to assist students in paying for books, materials and other costs, other than test fees, related to accelerated college credit programs. These grants are available to any Accelerated College Credit program as administered by the local educational agency (school district or postsecondary institution).
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Expanded Options: Not applicable—courses are taken only at postsecondary institutions.

Dual Credit: Yes. Participating school districts and postsecondary institutions must develop written agreements based on the policies described in administrative rule regarding dual credit programs. Agreements must include criteria regarding approval of courses, selection and approval of instructors, admissions, procedures, counseling, monitoring, and evaluation. Standards for teachers of lower division collegiate courses must include a master's degree in a subject area closely related to that in which the instructor will be teaching; however, in subject areas in which individuals have demonstrated their competencies and served in professional fields and in cases in which documentation to support the individual's proficiency and high level of competency can be assembled, the master's degree requirement may be waived by the college president or substituted according to the community college's personnel policy.

The Oregon Dual Credit Standards include standards for curriculum, faculty, students, and assessment: 
  • College or university courses administered through a dual credit program are catalogued courses and approved through the regular course approval process of the sponsoring college or university. These courses have the same departmental designation, number, title, and credits as their college counterparts, and they adhere to the same course descriptions.
  • College or university courses adminstered through a dual credit program are recorded on the official academic record for students at the sponsoring college or university.
  • College or university courses administered through dual credit programs reflect the pedagogical, theoretical and philosophical orientation of the colleges’ and universities’ sponsoring academic departments.
  • Instructors teaching college or university courses through dual credit meet the academic requirements for faculty and instructors teaching in postsecondary institutions as stipulated by the respective academic departments.
  • The postsecondary institution provides high school instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and dual credit administrative requirements before certifying the instructors to teach the college/university courses.
  • Instructors teaching dual credit sections are part of a continuing collegial interaction, through professional development, seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institutions’ faculty and dual credit administration. This interaction addresses issues such as course content, course delivery, assessment, evaluation, and professional development in the field of study.
  • High school students enrolled in courses administered through dual credit programs are officially registered or admitted as degree-seeking, non-degree or non-matriculated students of the sponsoring postsecondary institution.
  • Postsecondary institutions outline specific course requirements and prerequisites.
  • High school students are provided with a student guide that outlines their responsibilities as well as guidelines for the transfer of credit.
  • Dual credit students are held to the same standards of achievement as those expected of students in on-campus sections.
  • Every section of a course offered through dual credit is regularly reviewed by faculty from that discipline and dual credit staff to assure that grading standards are consistent with those in on-campus sections.
  • Dual credit students are assessed using similar methods (e.g. papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs, etc.) as their on-campus counterparts.
Program reporting requirement
Yes. School districts and Education Service Districts must annually report Achievement Compact data to the Oregon Education Investment Board. The Achievement Compact includes a measure for reporting students earning nine or more college credits. Due to the Mandate Relief projects affirmed in Senate Bills 560 and 800 in 2011, school districts are not currently required to report data on Expanded Options programs. 
 
Postsecondary Achievement Compacts include a measure for reporting on the postsecondary students who are dual enrolled in Oregon high schools. Each community college annually reports on the Reimbursable Section Count, FTE, unduplicated headcount, and credits earned in dual credit and Two-plus-Two programs. Data on community college Accelerated College Credit programs is collected through the Oregon Community College Unified Reporting System, a collaboratively designed and maintained base of data relating to the seventeen Oregon community colleges. In addition, postsecondary institutions annually update the Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development with information relating to program names, registration fees, tuition and fees costs per credit, and instructor requirements.
Program evaluation component Yes. Dual Credit students and their non-Dual Credit peers are compared with respect to subsequent academic performance and persistence to goal. In 2008 the Oregon University System Office of Institutional Research, in collaboration with the Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, undertook a Dual Credit in Oregon pilot study to evaluate dual credit instruction. After it appeared, the Joint Boards of Education, acting through the Unified Education Enterprise, directed that it be repeated every two years with the aim of establishing a protocol by which to assess the effectiveness of dual credit programs. 

In addition, at the discretion of the Joint Boards of Education in 2009 the Dual Credit Oversight Committee was formed. This committee, consisting of administrators, faculty, and program coordinators from Oregon’s high schools, community colleges, and public universities, was charged with implementing the program application and certification process for Oregon’s dual credit programs to align with the Oregon Dual Credit Standards.  In July 2012 the Higher Education Coordinating Commission (HECC) assumed the role of the Joint Boards of Education in statute). 
 
The Oregon Dual Credit Standards are based upon the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships accreditation standards.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Pennsylvania
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes. However, program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds.
Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Secondary credit. Postsecondary credit must be awarded if the concurrent student enrolls in the postsecondary institution at which the concurrent student took a concurrent course, and may be awarded if the concurrent student enrolls in a postsecondary institution other than the one at which the concurrent student earned the credits.

In addition, a student in a charter school, nonpublic school, private school or home education program must be permitted to enroll in concurrent courses in the concurrent enrollment agreement approved by the student's school district of residence, provided that the charter school, nonpublic school, private school or home education program awards secondary credit for a successfully completed concurrent course.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
CTE component Yes. Students in area vocational-technical schools may participate in concurrent enrollment programs. Concurrent enrollment program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds.

In addition, vocational programs must submit evidence of compliance with provisions in administrative code, including evidence that articulation exists between secondary and postsecondary institutions within a service area and that a system exists promoting seamless transition to ensure the maximum opportunity for student placement including opportunities for concurrent enrollment, dual enrollment, or other strategies that promote acquisition of postsecondary credit while still in high school. Evidence includes articulation agreements and concurrent or dual enrollment agreements.
Unique characteristics Students in charter schools operating in a school entity, nonpublic or private schools for which the entity provides free transportation, and students in home education programs are also eligible to participate, provided the charter school, nonpublic school, private school or home education program awards secondary credit for a successfully completed concurrent course. Districts must provide such schools/programs with written notice of the availability of concurrent enrollment programming in the district. School districts are eligible for concurrent enrollment grant funds for students in charter schools, nonpublic schools, private schools or home education programs.

Upon request of a board of school directors of a school entity, the department of education must provide technical assistance in the development of concurrent enrollment agreements and concurrent enrollment programs.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. Private two- and four-year colleges, private licensed schools, and four-year private postsecondary institutions may also participate.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Postsecondary placement test scores, and demonstrated readiness for college-level coursework, as determined by the postsecondary institution.
  • Not specified. Any additional criteria set forth in the agreement between the school district or area vocational-technical school and the participating postsecondary institution.
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. The results of nationally available achievement tests or other standardized tests included in the participating school entity's local assessment system, and satisfactory progress toward fulfilling applicable secondary school graduation requirements, as determined by the school entity.
A student who does not meet the eligibility requirements set forth in a concurrent enrollment agreement between a school entity and postsecondary institution may enroll in concurrent courses by meeting alternate criteria agreed upon by the school entity and the eligible postsecondary institution. In addition, each concurrent enrollment agreement must also include a description of minimum performance criteria, in courses offered by the school entity and in concurrent courses, required for students to remain in the concurrent enrollment program.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes — no more than 24 postsecondary credits in any school year.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No. However, the department of education must publish promotional materials on its website that school districts and area vocational-technical schools may use to inform parents and students about the requirements, features and opportunities of concurrent enrollment programs. To the extent that the department provides school entities with printed promotional materials for dissemination, the department must make such materials available, upon request, to any charter school, nonpublic school, private school or home education program.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Combination of student’s district and student/parent. A school entity (district or an area vocational-technical school) pays the portion of total approved costs for which it is provided grants by the department of education, and students/parents pay the remainder. To defray—but not eliminate—district costs for concurrent enrollment students, the department provides grants to applicant school districts with an approved concurrent enrollment program, as well as a supplemental grant amount for an applicant district with a low-income concurrent enrollment student. The supplemental grant amount is equal the cost of tuition, books and fees for which a low-income concurrent student is responsible for a course.

A school entity is not responsible for paying any portion of the total approved costs for any concurrent student enrolled in a charter school, nonpublic or private school, or home education program in excess of the grants provided by the department of education.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds.*
How state funds participating high schools Equal, with qualifications. A district receives full state funding for a student if the district pays the student’s tuition, fees, and textbooks. If the district does not pay the student’s tuition and fees, the district receives a prorated amount of state funding based on the amount of time that the student spent in the classroom.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Each concurrent enrollment agreement between a school district or area vocational technical school and a postsecondary institution must include a description and explanation of the criteria used to determine concurrent courses offered by the postsecondary institution. The agreement must provide that the course is identical to that offered when concurrent students are not enrolled—including the use of an identical curriculum, assessments and instructional materials—and enforcement of identical prerequisite coursework requirements as enforced when concurrent students are not enrolled.

A school district or area vocational school employee who meets all qualifications for an adjunct faculty member at the eligible postsecondary institution may teach a concurrent enrollment course.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Program reporting requirement Yes, for districts and area vocational-technical schools receiving state funding for concurrent enrollment programs. Each such entity must report
  • The eligible postsecondary institution(s) with which the school entity has established a concurrent enrollment program
  • The number of participating students
  • The number of students participating in a concurrent enrollment program who are enrolled in early college high school, middle college high school or gateway to college programs
  • The courses offered through a concurrent enrollment program
  • The total approved cost for each concurrent course
  • The total amount of funds received from the department through concurrent enrollment grants
  • The number of concurrent students enrolled in charter schools, nonpublic schools, private schools or home education programs.

The department of education must develop an annual report on concurrent enrollment programs using the aforementioned information submitted by school entities. The annual report must be provided to specified legislative leaders, and published on the department website.

The department of education must also make an annual report to the governor and legislative leadership on the operations of community colleges. The report must include, among other data, dual enrollment participation.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. However, community colleges, member institutions of the state system of higher education and state-related institutions may not refuse to recognize and award credit for a concurrent course simply because the credit was earned through a concurrent enrollment program.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*

Rhode Island
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No

CTE component Yes. High school career and technical education programs must use combinations of traditional and career-and-technical education courses, as well as project-based and work-based experiences and/or dual enrollment to provide experiences needed to move students through high school to completion and success in postsecondary education and careers. In addition, career and technical schools are subject to the requirements of the statewide dual enrollment policy.
Unique characteristics Legislation directs the department of elementary and secondary education to develop targeted dropout prevention interventions "or identify appropriate existing methods for school districts" in which the dropout rate, as calculated by the department, exceeds 15%. These interventions may include "[a]lternative programs designed to reengage dropouts including dual enrollment courses at the community college level" and offering full course fee waivers for free- and reduced-lunch students enrolled in dual credit courses.

Each student must have an individual learning plan (ILP) developed no later than the 6th grade to help students identify and meet their academic, career, and personal/social goals. The ILP must document the student's college and career interests and learning supports, as well as additional educational opportunities, such as dual enrollment.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Not specified. However, each LEA must offer pathways that include Advanced Placement (AP) courses, career and technical programs, dual enrollment, and opportunities for extended applied learning (e.g., internships, job shadowing, and community service learning). 
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified
Cap on number of credits students may earn No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No, for on-campus dual enrollment courses. However, information on quality providers of online dual enrollment courses must be coordinated between RIDE and higher education to ensure that families and students are aware of acceptable course work that meets both graduation requirements and higher education acceptance and dual enrollment credit recognition.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy

Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Not set in state policy
How state funds participating high schools Not defined
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not applicable--courses offered only at postsecondary institutions. Instructors of online dual enrollment courses must be appropriately qualified from an accredited postsecondary institution.
Program reporting requirement Yes. School districts must annually report to the department of elementary and secondary education the number of students, the number of credits enrolled in at postsecondary institutions, the name of the institution, and the dollar amount the district is allocated for this program. Beginning in 2016, the department must annually provide a report to the governor and house and senate leaders that contains the above information by district and in the aggregate.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear

South Carolina
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Technical education courses may be taken under dual enrollment agreements.
Unique characteristics Dual enrollment students must be guaranteed convenient geographic and electronic access to student and academic support comparable to what is accorded on-campus students, including access to library resources. Students must also have reasonable access to the course instructor outside regular classroom hours either in person, via phone, or electronically.

Institutions must cooperate with each other in offering dual enrollment courses in a particular geographic area.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Minimum GPA. Only for course sections in four-year institutions and two-year regional campuses of the University of South Carolina.
  • Written approval/recommendation. High school principal or designee
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Only for technical colleges.
  • Not specified. An individual college or university may establish additional criteria for admission.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. "The number of college-level courses completed in these dual enrollment offerings will vary according to the student's ability and work ethic."
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Student/parent, unless otherwise specified in local school district policy.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Courses must be equivalent in content and rigor to the equivalent college courses offered to college students and taught by appropriately credentialed faculty. Courses must also be comparable in expected outcomes, syllabus, textbook(s), teaching methodologies, and assessment strategies to the traditional postsecondary course. Courses must be approved by the institution’s chief academic officer or designee.

The chief academic officer or designee is also responsible for selecting and evaluating all dual enrollment faculty, using Southern Association of Colleges and Schools criteria as minimal requirements, and ensuring standards of student evaluation and faculty evaluation are comparable to those required of other sections of the same courses.Orientation and evaluation of instructors teaching dual enrollment course sections rests with the appropriate academic department of the respective institution of higher education. The chief academic officer or designee must assure consistency and comparability of both orientation and evaluation across the institution. To assure comparability, academic departments must provide instructors with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty liaison.

Dual enrollment instructors must participate in the institution’s expected, relevant professional development and evaluation activities. Traditionally-delivered (non-online) dual enrollment offered in high schools should only be offered within reasonable commuting distance of the institution to facilitate on-site evaluation and supervision.

Dual enrollment courses should use the same assessment methods as traditional course offering. The college faculty in the relevant department must approve formative and summative assessment strategies and tools.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Each institution must develop an annual report on dual enrollment offerings that demonstrates compliance with policy and procedures, to be submitted to the Division of Academic Affairs and Licensing of the Commission on Higher Education. Each technical college must send its annual report to the State Technical College System office, which must assemble a summary report for the technical college system and transmit it and the 16 institutional reports to the CHE. The commission on higher education must in turn publish an annual report on dual enrollment offerings in the prior year by public postsecondary institutions.
Program evaluation component Yes. The chief academic officer of the institution of higher education offering the course is responsible for the review of student performance prior to the continuation of the course and the instructor in subsequent semesters.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes, provided a general education course is on the list of universally transferable courses maintained by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. For technical education courses, dual enrollment credit must transfer to other public institutions if the student enrolls in a technical college after high school which allows for such a course to be counted toward an associate degree, diploma, or certificate.

South Dakota
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program No title. A high school student may enroll in an institution of higher education or a postsecondary vocational education institution. The board of regents policy manual uses the terms “dual credit” and “dual enrollment” for courses offered in the high school.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Not specified. Both may be earned. However, since board of regents policy provides that having all students in a dual enrollment course enrolled for college credit may be difficult in smaller school districts, at a minimum more than 50% of the students in a high school-based dual enrollment course must be enrolled for college credit.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. Postsecondary vocational education institutions may accept students in grades 10-12 as special students.
Unique characteristics None identified
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet ACT college-ready benchmarks in all subtests; or
  • Meet undergraduate admissions requirements (ACT or coursework); or
  • If a high school senior, rank in the upper one-half of their class or score at or above the 50th percentile on a nationally standardized, norm-referenced test, such as the ACT or SAT; or
  • If a high school junior, rank in the upper one-third of their class or score at or above the 70th percentile on a nationally standardized, norm-referenced test, such as the ACT or SAT.
And
  • Student in grades 11-12, although students in lower grades can participate if they demonstrate they are prepared to do college-level work.
The first two options are preferred, but alternatives commonly used by colleges and universities are also included. In addition, students enrolling in math or composition must meet placement requirements established in policy.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. District may cover all or a portion of tuition and fees; the student is responsible for paying any tuition/fees not paid by the district and any other costs.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for dual credit/dual enrollment courses offered in high schools. A high school-based dual enrollment course must be taught by a high school teacher who has been approved by the university and who meets the standards used by the institution to hire adjuncts in the discipline. While a Master’s degree in the subject/discipline teaching is preferred, faculty typically must have a Master’s degree with 15 graduate hours in the subject discipline/taught.

A faculty member in the discipline of the course from the credit granting university must be assigned to and actively engaged as a mentor for the high school teacher.

The faculty of the institution granting credit must develop the course syllabus. College courses require a minimum of 15 class hours (one hour equals 50 minutes) of class time for each semester credit hour. Additional class hours for science laboratories must be specified.

The preferred validation of student learning in the high school-based dual enrollment course for the Regental system is via the national AP or CLEP exam instruments. An acceptable alternative is a student evaluation and assessment system developed jointly by the discipline faculty of the university and the high school teacher. Under this arrangement, high school students are expected to demonstrate the same mastery of the college course as is required of college students who take the course on campus.
Program reporting requirement Not set in state policy
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No. Postsecondary institutions must award credit only if the college credit is granted by a university with which the South Dakota Board of Regents has a dual credit agreement, or the college credit is granted by an institution accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships (NACEP).

Tennessee
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State offers several avenues. Dual Credit program means a postsecondary course, taught in a high school by certified secondary instructors, the successful completion of which prepares a student to sit for a postsecondary challenge examination, administered under the supervision of postsecondary faculty or a consortium approved certified secondary instructor. The student's score on the challenge examination is used by a postsecondary institution to determine the granting of postsecondary credit towards a diploma or a certificate or an associate or baccalaureate degree.

A Dual Enrollment program allows a student to enroll in postsecondary courses for high school and postsecondary credit.

No title: A student may enroll in a course at a postsecondary institution or offered online by the institution. The student may receive high school credit for participating in such courses in accordance with local board policy. State funds to the local school system may not be diminished because of the student's participation.

Early admission into college may be considered for a 12th grader with a minimum 3.5 GPA and ACT composite score of at least 25. A student must have written endorsement from the principal, counseling staff and the participating postsecondary institution. Freshman coursework taken at the institution will substitute for the courses which the student needed for graduation from high school. The student is awarded credit for the senior year after having completed the freshman year in college.

Responses in this profile are specific to dual credit and dual enrollment.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
  • Other.  At a facility owned or leased by an education partner, if any
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual credit and dual enrollment: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes. A community college may develop a cooperative innovative program targeted to high school students who need postsecondary remediation. Such a student, upon certification by the community college of the student's successful participation and upon admittance to the postsecondary institution, must be deemed to need no further remediation.

A college of applied technology may develop a cooperative innovative program targeted to high school students who may need remediation in technical math and reading upon enrollment in a college of applied technology. If the remediation is successful, upon admittance to any college of applied technology, the student must be deemed to need no further remediation.
CTE component Yes. The Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education must oversee the development of a statewide high school to postsecondary agreement building on aligned, secondary college-and-career technical pathways to specific postsecondary programs of study and that includes early postsecondary credit.
Unique characteristics Private and home school students may apply for a Dual Enrollment Grant.

Statute creates an Office of Postsecondary Coordination and Alignment in the division of career and technical education in the department of education, and a Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education. The office is assigned various duties in statute related to early postsecondary credit and dual credit, including making recommendations to the consortium for cooperative innovative education for the development of specific early postsecondary credit opportunities.

The consortium is charged with (1) developing and implementing a program to align secondary and postsecondary courses, (2) developing and implementing early postsecondary credit opportunities, and (3) Create marketing channels to advise students of early postsecondary education opportunities (i.e., dual enrollment, dual credit, Advanced Placement (AP), College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and International Baccalaureate). The consortium may create an advisory committee to examine best practices in cooperative innovative education, suggest options to promote early college credit opportunities, and advise the consortium on workforce needs. The advisory committee must invite and encourage the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Tennessee Business Roundtable and the Tennessee Independent College and Universities Association to participate in the advisory committee's activities.

Statute also directs the consortium to review, by July 2013, existing dual credit pilot projects, determine the viability of these courses for statewide implementation, and implement viable courses. The consortium must also develop and implement statewide postsecondary courses, with accompanying challenge examinations, that reflect common learning outcomes established among the postsecondary institutions that already have the course in the individual institution's academic inventory. The initial statewide early postsecondary credit opportunities and their assessments must be piloted on a statewide basis in the 2013-2014 school year in high schools that opt in. In succeeding years additional early postsecondary credit opportunities, including dual enrollment, must be developed as funds are made available.

The consortium, in cooperation with the office of postsecondary coordination and alignment, must develop a strategic plan for the establishment of statewide dual enrollment and dual credit opportunities.

The LEA and the participating postsecondary institution must determine for each course the length of time of instruction, which may be that required for public schools, or that required for the attainment of postsecondary learning outcomes.

It is the intent of the general assembly that funding for Tennessee HOPE scholarships, Tennessee HOPE access grants and Wilder-Naifeh technical skills grants take priority over funding for dual enrollment grants. Subject to legislative appropriations and laws regarding funding shortfalls from the net proceeds of the state lottery, the award for a credit hour taken under a dual enrollment grant must be determined by TSAC and may not exceed the cost per credit hour of courses taken at community colleges in the state university and community college system.

For a home-school student to be eligible for a General Assembly Merit Scholarship (GAMS), the student must, among other criteria, be enrolled in at least four college credit courses totaling at least 12 credit hours and earn a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. (Public and private school students are not subject to this requirement.)

If a dual credit or dual enrollment program has an education partner that is a public body, the program may use state, federal and local funds allocated or appropriated to that body. Use of funds is subject to any limitations or restrictions placed on those funds by federal or state law or local ordinance. The county governing body in a county where a program is located may nevertheless appropriate funds to a program approved under this chapter. The LEA and the cooperating public postsecondary institution are strongly encouraged to seek funds from sources other than state, federal and local appropriations.

A dual credit or dual enrollment program must comply with the campus’ laws and policies regarding the education of students with disabilities, and must comply with all statutes, regulations, policies and guidelines regarding student discipline.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, the office of postsecondary coordination and alignment must encourage LEAs throughout the state, including those in rural areas, to offer early postsecondary credit classes (i.e., dual enrollment, dual credit, Advanced Placement (AP), College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and International Baccalaureate).
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements Dual Enrollment: Not set in state policy. However, to be eligible for a Dual Enrollment Grant, a student must be in grades 11-12 and meet other eligibility criteria.

Early admission: Early admission into college may be considered for a 12th grader with a minimum 3.5 GPA and ACT composite score of at least 25.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy. However, a student's participation in the Dual Enrollment Grant program, which covers up to 2 courses per semester during grades 11 and 12, is limited to the remaining amount of time normally required to complete the high school diploma, from the time of initial participation in the program. The grant is available for the regular fall and spring semester, and for summer semesters prior to graduation from high school for those students who did not exceed the maximum award during the regular school year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. The office of postsecondary coordination and alignment must make available to students, their parents, and other stakeholders, prior to students enrolling in an early postsecondary credit course, the requirements for receipt of credit at each postsecondary institution and the transferability of credits among public postsecondary institutions. High schools must also disseminate to students taking a dual credit class information on the acceptance of challenge examinations and on each postsecondary institution’s awarding of postsecondary major credit or elective credit for the course.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition State. If a program is funded through local, state or federal funds appropriated to an LEA, then no fee may be charged by the LEA or a public postsecondary institution to any student participating in the program.

A dual enrollment grant, funded from net proceeds of the state lottery, is available to an applicant public or private high school junior or senior who is not ineligible for a state lottery-funded grant, has been a Tennessee resident for at least one year prior to application, and has been admitted to a postsecondary institution. A grant recipient may enroll in one lower-division course per semester at an eligible institution, and may enroll in a 2nd course per semester if the student has a minimum 3.0 GPA for high school work completed before dual enrollment, and has earned the minimum ACT or SAT score to qualify for a Tennessee HOPE scholarship. Financial assistance for a 2nd course per semester reduces the amount of any subsequent award of the Tennessee HOPE scholarship on a dollar per dollar basis.

A recipient may reapply for a grant in a subsequent semester if the student continues to meet all eligibility requirements and has a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75 for all postsecondary courses attempted under a grant. Courses completed through a dual enrollment grant do not count against semester hour/academic year limitations for receipt of a HOPE scholarship.
How state funds participating high schools Not defined
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Dual Enrollment: Courses must demonstrate equivalent postsecondary course learning outcomes and equivalent faculty preparation in order for the course to be taught in the high school.

Dual Credit: College courses offered at the high school during the regular school day must be taught by licensed teachers or bona fide college instructors approved by the local school system and the postsecondary institution.

Any high school may replicate a dual credit class that is offered by a public four- or two-year institution or college of applied technology and approved by the consortium. Any consortium-approved dual credit class must include a postsecondary challenge examination, which students must pass with a cut score at least equal to the receiving institution’s minimum, to receive postsecondary credit. Prior to consortium approval of a dual credit class, representatives from the University of Tennessee and the board of regents must consult with faculty members at institutions in the major or program for which the class is designed as to whether approving the class would have any negative consequences on the institution or program’s accreditation. The consortium must consider faculty members’ concerns in its determination on approval of classes and cut scores.

The chancellor of the board of regents and the president of the University of Tennessee (or designees) must convene postsecondary faculty to develop common learning outcomes and statewide challenge examinations, conduct reliability and validation activities to assure the quality and fairness of the examinations, establish cut scores, and report student scores to the division of career and technical education in the department of education. Validation requirements for postsecondary credit through a dual credit course must be determined by the postsecondary institutions and their respective governing boards.

The Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education is charged with establishing a process for developing challenge examinations consistent with the most current “Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing” developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association and National Council on Measurement in Education, resulting in a statewide challenge examination program for designated postsecondary courses. The office of postsecondary coordination and alignment must develop a secure database to allow postsecondary institutions to review scores from dual credit course challenge examinations, to evaluate scores for potential postsecondary credit.

Any public institution of higher education may request the consortium to review a dual credit course and its challenge examination, if the institution perceives the course or its assessment to possess deficiencies. A public higher education institution may also challenge a high school’s right to continue offering a dual credit course should a perceived deficiency be demonstrated within the high school. The consortium must review the dual credit course, assessment or high school, and work with the high school(s) to remove any deficiencies. The consortium may also request that the class at a high school be withdrawn for the dual credit process until such deficiencies are corrected.

The consortium may not approve a program if the program in any way adversely affects an institution’s accreditation.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The commissioner of education must publish an annual report, which must include a list of the dual enrollment courses taken by students in each LEA and a list of the dual enrollment courses taken by students in each of the LEA's schools that serve grades in which dual enrollment courses could be taken. The number of students taking dual enrollment courses and the percentage of students successfully completing dual enrollment courses must be reported by LEA and by school. This report must be distributed to (1) The governor; (2) The members of the general assembly; (3) The members of the state board of education; (4) State and local news media; (5) Local directors of schools; (6) Local boards of education; (7) Presidents of state and local education associations; (8) Presidents of state and local school board associations; (9) State and local parent-teacher organizations; (10) County mayors; (11) Mayors; (12) Local chambers of commerce; (13) Members of local legislative bodies; and (14) Local public libraries.

In addition, the Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education must annually report to the house and senate education committees. The report must include a description of each program and an evaluation of its success. It must also include a report by (1) the board of regents and the trustees of the University of Tennessee of the number of students who receive early postsecondary credit and who are retained and graduate, and (2) the office of postsecondary coordination and alignment of the effectiveness of the secondary institutions in meeting the purposes of § 49-15-101, including participation numbers, graduation rates of the participants, and the number of students continuing into postsecondary education within one (1) year of graduation.
Program evaluation component Yes. Success of a program must be measured by high school retention rates, high school completion rates, high school dropout rates, certification and associate and baccalaureate degree completion, admission to four-year institutions, post-graduation employment in career or study-related fields, employer satisfaction of employees who participated in and graduated from the programs and other measures as the consortium finds appropriate. The Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education must evaluate programs for success, establish best practices and lessons learned from successful programs and provide assistance to LEAs and postsecondary institutions seeking to implement a program by replicating or adapting a successful program designed elsewhere or through creation of a new program. The consortium’s annual report to the house and senate education committees must include participants’ graduation rates, and the number of students continuing into postsecondary education within 1 year of graduation.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes. Dual enrollment courses listed in the Tennessee Transfer Pathways are recognized for transfer credit by all Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) institutions. Courses listed as general ed. typically meet all TBR institutions’ requirements; the link identifies those recognized only at specific institutions.

A peer institution (i.e., four-year, two-year, or college of applied technology) must award the student credit for a dual credit course if the student passes the course’s challenge examination with a score equal to or higher than the cut score required by the institution. However, each higher education institution awarding the credit determines whether the class credit is applied toward a major or the requirements of a specific program, or as an elective. A postsecondary institution may also set the cut score on the challenge examination results that is required for the award of credit in a major or a specific program or as an elective at the institution.

Participating high schools and postsecondary institutions developing unique dual credit or dual enrollment opportunities (outside statewide courses) must notify students prior to such dual credit course being taught of the availability of transfer of the course.

Private postsecondary institutions are encouraged to assess the statewide agreement produced by the consortium and determine which courses, if any, qualify for award of college credit at the institution. If a private institution determines a course qualifies for award of college credit, the institution, in addition to any institutional publication made of this fact, may notify the department of education of the potential for award of college credit for such course at the institution, for the department to disseminate this information to LEAs for notification of high school students.

Texas
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State policy primarily uses the term dual credit, but also uses concurrent enrollment, joint high school and college credit, articulated postsecondary courses/articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit courses, and dual enrollment to refer to high school students’ enrollment in postsecondary coursework for both secondary and postsecondary credit. In other sections of statute, concurrent enrollment applies to a postsecondary student enrolled at more than one institution at the same time. A district and public two- or four-year institution may enter into an agreement to offer any such courses.

A public junior college may enter into an agreement with a school district or private high school (within or outside the junior college district’s service area) to offer a course through which students may receive high school and junior college credit.

A public junior college may also enter into an articulation agreement with one or more school districts in the junior college district to provide a dropout recovery program to persons under age 26. The junior college must offer advanced academic and transition opportunities, including dual credit and college preparatory courses. This profile does not include details about dropout recovery programs.
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual credit, concurrent enrollment, joint high school and college credit, articulated postsecondary courses/articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit courses, and dual enrollment: Both

Administrative code also allows for contractual agreements between school districts and public two-year colleges, for colleges to provide instruction in courses to high school students for award of high school credit only.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Yes. Each school district must partner with at least one institution of higher education to develop and provide 12th grade courses in college preparatory mathematics and English language arts. A course may be offered for dual credit at the institution of higher education’s discretion.

Public colleges may not offer remedial and developmental courses for dual credit.
CTE component Yes. To meet the requirement that districts offer the equivalent of at least 12 credit hours of college credit in high school, a district may offer a program may offer the opportunity to earn credit for a course or activity, including an apprenticeship or training hours, that is approved by the higher education coordinating board, satisfies a requirement for earning an industry-recognized credential or certificate or an associate degree, and for which a student may earn credit toward both the student's high school diploma and postsecondary academic requirements.

2013 legislation creates the Texas Workforce Innovation Needs Program, to provide selected school districts, and public and private postsecondary institutions with the opportunity to establish innovative programs to prepare students for careers for which there is demand in the state. An applicant school district or institution must submit a plan that must, to the greatest extent appropriate for the grade or higher education levels served under the program, either: (1) focus on engagement of students in competency-based learning as necessary to earn postsecondary credentials, or (2) incorporate CTE courses into dual enrollment courses.

The comptroller is authorized to grant for the development of new CTE courses or programs at public junior colleges and public technical institutes. Such a grant may be used to support courses, including dual credit courses, to prepare students for employment in occupations identified by local businesses as being in high demand. In awarding a grant, the comptroller must primarily consider the potential economic returns to the state from the development of the career and technical education course or program. The comptroller may also consider whether the course or program offers new or expanded dual credit CTE opportunities in public high schools.

The state education agency must biennially update a state plan for career and technology education. The plan must include procedures designed to ensure that districts provide, to the greatest extent possible, opportunities for CTE students to enroll in dual credit courses designed to lead to a degree, license, or certification.
Unique characteristics The institution of higher education in closest geographic proximity to a public high school as substantially below the state average in the number of graduates enrolling in higher education institutions must enter into an agreement with that high school to develop a plan to increase students’ college-going rates. Under the plan, the institution must actively engage with local school districts to provide access to rigorous, high-quality dual credit opportunities for qualified students as needed.

Each school district receives an annual allotment of $275 for each student in average daily attendance in grades 9-12. With certain exceptions, a district or campus must use such funds for any of five purposes, including implementing or administering a program that encourages students to pursue advanced academic opportunities, including early college high school programs and dual credit, Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate courses.

Statute directs the commissioner to establish by rule an academic distinction designation for districts and campuses for outstanding performance in attainment of postsecondary readiness. The criteria the commissioner adopts for the designation must include, among others, percentages of students who completed a dual credit course or an articulated postsecondary course provided for local credit.

A student may earn a performance acknowledgment on the student's diploma and transcript by satisfying the requirements for that acknowledgment adopted by the state board by rule. An acknowledgment under this subsection may be earned for outstanding performance in a dual credit course.

The state board must establish a process to review and approve an applied STEM course to satisfy a math or science course otherwise required under the foundation high school program. The applied STEM course must qualify as a dual credit course or an articulated postsecondary course provided for local credit or articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit course provided for state credit.

The commissioner of higher education and the commissioner of education, in consultation with the comptroller and the Texas Workforce Commission, may award a grant of up to $1 million to an institution of higher education to develop advanced mathematics and science courses to prepare high school students for employment in a high-demand occupation. (Definition of “high-demand occupation” for these purposes jointly determined by the commissioner of higher education, the commissioner of education, the comptroller, and the Texas Workforce Commission.) An institution of higher education must work in partnership with at least one independent school district and a business entity in developing a course under this grant. A course developed for these purposes must be offered for dual credit.

Students in dual credit courses must have access to the same or comparable support services that are afforded college students on the main campus. The college is responsible for ensuring timely and efficient access to such services (e.g., academic advising and counseling), to learning materials (e.g., library resources), and to other benefits for which the student may be eligible.

Students pursuing the distinguished achievement high school program (a.k.a. advanced high school program) must achieve any combination of four “advanced measures,” one of which is college academic courses, including those taken for dual credit, and advanced technical credit courses, including locally articulated courses, with a grade of 3.0 or higher.

For courses offered through an agreement with a public junior college and a school district or private high school: Private school students and home school students may also participate. The public junior college must apply the same criteria and conditions to each student wishing to enroll in the course without regard to whether the student attends a public school or a private or parochial school, including a home school.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, each school district must offer the equivalent of at least 12 credit hours of college credit in high school, which may be offered through Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, dual credit, articulated postsecondary courses provided for local credit or articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit courses provided for state credit, or any combination thereof. Institutions are not required to offer dual credit courses.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From the high school principal or other school official designated by the school district.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Students must meet all the college's regular prerequisite requirements designated for that course (e.g., minimum score on a specified placement test, minimum grade in a specified previous course, etc.).
  • Not specified. For courses provided through an agreement between a public junior college and a school district or private high school, the public junior college must apply the same criteria and conditions to each student wishing to enroll in the course without regard to whether the student attends a public school or a private or parochial school, including a home school. Postsecondary institutions and school districts may impose additional eligibility requirements.
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Student must demonstrate college readiness by achieving the minimum passing standards under the provisions of the Texas Success Initiative on relevant section(s) of an assessment instrument as approved by the board, or demonstrate that he/she is exempt under the provisions of the Texas Success Initiative. Alternatively, a student may also demonstrate eligibility by (1) achieving a minimum designated Level 2 final phase-in score on the Algebra II end-of-course assessment and/or the English II reading or English II writing end-of-course assessments, relevant to the courses to be attempted, or (2) achieving a combined score of 107 on the PSAT/NMSQT with a minimum of 50 on the critical reading and/or mathematics test relevant to the courses to be attempted, or (3) achieving a composite score of 23 on the PLAN with a 19 or higher in mathematics and English. A student is eligible to enroll in workforce education dual credit courses he/she achieves the designated minimum final phase-in score on the Algebra I end-of-course assessment and/or the English II reading or English II writing end-of-course assessments relevant to the courses to be attempted.
For courses offered through a partnership between a secondary school and public two-year college: Student eligibility requirements established in partnership agreement.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes — 2 courses a semester. Exceptions may be made by the principal and postsecondary partner's chief academic officer for students with outstanding academic performance and capability, as demonstrated by grade point average, SAT or ACT scores, or other criteria.

For courses offered through an agreement with a public junior college and a school district or private high school: Yes — three courses per academic year if the student's high school falls outside the junior college district’s service area.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. Districts must annually notify parents of students in grades 9-12 of opportunities to earn college credit, including through dual credit programs and joint high school and college credit programs. The notification must include the name and contact information of any public or private entity offering a college credit program in the district. A school district may provide this notification on the district's website.

In addition, during the first school year a student is enrolled in a high school, and again during each successive year of enrollment in high school, a school counselor must provide information to the student and the student's parent on the availability of programs in the district under which a student may earn college credit, including Advanced Placement programs, dual credit programs, joint high school and college credit programs, and International Baccalaureate programs.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Dual credit: Yes. Students in dual credit courses must be eligible to utilize the same or comparable support services afforded college students on the main campus. The college is responsible for ensuring timely and efficient access to such services (e.g., academic advising and counseling).

Courses offered through partnerships between secondary schools and public two-year colleges: Yes. The partnership agreement must address provision of student learning and support services.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. Higher education institutions and junior colleges with which a district has entered into an agreement may waive all or a portion of tuition and fees. If the institution does not provide a waiver, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.

Tuition and fees must be waived for a dual credit student under the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board must develop outreach programs to ensure that eligible students in grades 9-12 are aware of the availability of this exemption from tuition and fees
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal, with qualifications. A college may only claim funding for students earning college credit in core curriculum, career and technical education, and foreign language dual credit courses.

For a junior college offering a course through an agreement with a school district or private high school, the contact hours attributable to the high school student’s enrollment are included in the contact hours used to determine the junior college's proportionate share of the state money appropriated and distributed to public junior colleges, unless it is a physical education course.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Dual credit: Yes. The college selects dual credit instructors. These instructors must be regularly employed faculty members of the college or meet the same standards (including minimal requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) and approval procedures used by the college to select faculty responsible for teaching the same courses at the main campus of the college. The college must supervise and evaluate instructors of dual credit courses using the same or comparable procedures used for faculty at the main campus of the college. The college must ensure that a dual credit course and the corresponding course offered at the main campus of the college are equivalent with respect to the curriculum, materials, instruction, and method/rigor of student evaluation. These standards must be upheld regardless of the student composition of the class.

Regular academic policies applicable to courses taught at the college's main campus must also apply to dual credit courses (i.e., appeal process for disputed grades, drop policy, the communication of grading policy to students, when the syllabus must be distributed, etc.)

Courses offered through partnerships between secondary schools and public two-year colleges: The partnership agreement must address faculty qualifications, provision of student learning, and grading criteria.

Online courses: The Texas Education Agency evaluates and approves all electronic courses. If funds are insufficient to pay for evaluating and approving all courses submitted for approval, the agency must give priority to five types of courses, including courses that allow a student to earn college credit or other advanced credit.

Administrative code specifies the qualifications and professional development requirements applicable to secondary and college instructors offering electronic dual credit courses.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Districts must annually report to the Texas Education Agency the number of students, including CTE students, who have participated in the college credit program (i.e., dual credit,  articulated postsecondary courses, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, etc.), the number of courses in which students have enrolled, and the college credit hours students have earned.

The higher education coordinating board must maintain for each public junior college, public technical institute, and public state college an online resume for the institution designed for use by legislators and other interested policy makers. The resume must include the percentage of students who are enrolled in one or more dual credit courses at the institution for the most recent state fiscal year for which the information is available (and compare to the previous year and last five years for which information is available).
Program evaluation component Yes. Every local board must establish annual performance goals related to enrollment in advanced courses, including dual or college credit courses, Advanced Placement, and/or International Baccalaureate. Local boards must annually review data on the district's progress on enrollment in advanced courses, disaggregated by race, gender and socioeconomic status.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear. Each institution of higher education must adopt a policy to grant undergraduate course credit to entering freshmen who have successfully completed one or more college courses while in high school. Policy does not specify whether credit must be applied toward institution’s general core or major requirements, or may only be awarded for elective credit.

Utah
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Concurrent Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institutio
  • Other (two options: videoconferencing and Technology-intensive concurrent enrollment (TICE). TICE courses are designed as either hybrid courses, having a blend of different learning activities available both in classrooms and online, or may be offered exclusively online. These courses must facilitate articulation, transfer of credit, and when possible, use open source materials available to all state institutions of higher education in order to reduce costs. Statute sets the course fee for an online concurrent enrollment in 2012-13 at $350, to be adjusted beginning with the 2013-14 school year in accordance with the percentage change in value of the weighted pupil unit from the previous school year.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. Concurrent enrollment courses may be career and technical education. In addition, statute directs Utah State University Eastern and Snow College to each maintain a strong career and technical education curriculum at their campuses and within the regions they serve, to work with school districts and charter schools in developing an aggressive concurrent enrollment program, and to provide for open-entry, open-exit competency-based career and technical education programs at no cost to secondary students, that emphasize short-term job training or retraining for immediate placement in the job market and serve the geographic area encompassing specified school districts.
Unique characteristics The legislature must, subject to budget constraints, annually increase the money appropriated to the state board for concurrent enrollment based on (1) enrollment growth from additional students enrolled, courses offered, and credit hours taken, and (2) the percentage increase in the value of the weighted pupil unit.

The board of regents, after consultation with LEAs, must provide the Utah State Office of Education with proposed new course offerings, including syllabi and curriculum materials by November 30 of the year preceding the school year in which courses are to be offered. Concurrent enrollment funding is provided only for 1000 or 2000 level courses unless a student's SEOP identifies a student's readiness and preparation for a higher level course. This exception must be individually approved by the student's counselor and the LEA's concurrent enrollment administrator. Concurrent enrollment funding cannot fund unilateral parent/student initiated college attendance or course-taking.

Concurrent enrollment course offerings must reflect the strengths and resources of the respective schools and institutions and be based on student needs.

Concurrent enrollment courses may be offered to high school students only by the state institution of higher education in the corresponding geographic service region, as designated by the state board of regents. If the state institution of higher education in the corresponding service region chooses not to offer a concurrent enrollment course requested by a local board or charter school governing board, another state institution of higher education may offer the concurrent enrollment course. Courses delivered through technology are not subject to the corresponding geographic service region requirement.

Board of regents rules regarding concurrent enrollment courses taught at high schools must ensure collaboration among institutions of higher education, in the statewide offering of both general education and high demand career and technical education courses, including via technology.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. An appropriate assessment is administered prior to participation in English and math courses. Students must meet same prerequisites as for the same campus-based course by the sponsoring institution.
  • Not specified. In negotiating annual contracts, LEAs and institutions establish student eligibility requirements, which must be sufficiently selective to predict a successful experience for students. Regents policy under review as of February 2014 provides these locally-established requirements may include student GPA, ACT score, or a placement score that predicts success, letters of recommendation, approval of high school and college officials, appropriate placement assessments in math and English, and completion of course prerequisites.
  • Students in grades 11-12
  • Other. Parental permission. Students must also have a current student education/occupation plan (SEOP) on file at the participating school.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Yes. State reimbursement to LEAs may not exceed 30 semester hours per student per year.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. The state board and the board of regents must work together to effectively advise high school students on registering for concurrent enrollment courses. LEAs and institutions must coordinate advice and information provided to a prospective or current concurrent enrollment student. Advising must include providing information on general education requirements at higher education institutions and helping students and parents efficiently choose concurrent enrollment courses to avoid duplication or excess credit hours. The annual concurrent enrollment contract between an LEA and an institution must provide for the entity responsible for parent notification about concurrent enrollment purpose(s) and student and family privacy protections.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Combination of state and student/parent. Students may only be charged fees or partial tuition. Participating postsecondary institutions, districts and charter schools receive a portion of a state appropriation for concurrent enrollment that supports the costs of offering the program. Each institution may charge a one-time per student per institution admissions application fee, and partial tuition of up to $30 per credit hour for each concurrent enrollment course for which a student receives college credit, paid directly to the institution, or if a course is taught by high school instructor in a public school facility, tuition of up to $10 per credit hour. If a course is taught through video conferencing, an institution may only charge up to $15 per credit hour for the concurrent enrollment course for which the student receives credit. Students eligible for free-/reduced price lunch may be charged no more than $5 per credit hour for each course for which the student receives college credit.

Payment of the one-time fee satisfies the general admissions application fee requirement for a full-time or part-time student at an institution so that no additional admissions application fee may be charged by the institution in situations of continuous enrollment.

Fees do not include reasonable lab costs, expenses for textbooks and consumable curriculum materials that are required only for USHE credit or grades. All non-USHE related student costs or fees related to concurrent enrollment classes, which may include consumables, lab fees, copying, and material costs, as well as textbooks required for the course, are subject to fee waiver consistent with R277-407-6 (which requires LEAs to provide for adequate waivers or other provisions in lieu of fee waivers to ensure that no student is denied the opportunity to participate in a class or school-sponsored or supported activity because of an inability to pay a fee). LEAs are responsible for these waivers. The contract between the USHE institution and the district may address the responsibility for fee waivers.
How state funds participating high schools Equal, provided the student is enrolled in a concurrent enrollment program, and is earning high school and postsecondary credit. LEAs are reimbursed only for courses on the master list.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Indeterminate – dependent on the state allocation for the concurrent enrollment program, which is based on a formula established in 53A-17a-120.5.
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Public school teachers teaching concurrent enrollment courses in high schools must first be approved as adjunct faculty and be supervised by the institution. Public school educators must have secondary endorsements in the subject area(s) they teach and meet highly qualified standards for their assignment(s). High school teachers with adjunct or part time faculty status must be included as fully as possible in the academic life of the supervising academic department. LEAs and institutions must share expertise and professional development, as necessary, to adequately prepare teachers at all levels to teach concurrent enrollment students and content, including both federal and state laws specific to student privacy and student records. The annual concurrent enrollment contract between an LEA and an institution must provide for discussion and training, as necessary, to all concurrent enrollment instructors about student information, student records laws, and student confidentiality.

Postsecondary faculty who are not K-12 teachers and who have significant unsupervised access to K-12 students must complete a criminal background check.

Course content, procedures, and teaching materials in concurrent enrollment programs must be approved by the appropriate department or program at an institution of higher education in order to ensure quality and comparability with courses offered on postsecondary campuses. Institutions must additionally take responsibility for examinations and program monitoring, and all procedures and materials to ensure quality and comparability with courses offered on the campus. Course outlines, texts and other materials needed, and the administrative and supervisory services, professional development, and reporting mechanisms to be provided by each party to the contract are established by LEAs and institutions in the negotiation of annual contracts. Each LEA must provide an annual report to the state office of education (1) regarding supervisory services and professional development provided by a USHE institution, and (2) indicating that all concurrent enrollment instructors are in compliance with certain faculty quality criteria.

The number of courses offered for concurrent enrollment must be kept small enough to ensure coordinated statewide development and professional development activities for participating teachers.
Program reporting requirement Yes. The school performance report (public accountability report card) for each school and charter school (to be aggregated at the district and state level) must include the number of students taking Advanced Placement and concurrent enrollment courses, and the number and percent of concurrent enrollment students who receive college credit for the course.

Each LEA must provide an annual report to the state office of education (1) regarding supervisory services and professional development provided by a USHE institution, and (2) indicating that all concurrent enrollment instructors are in compliance with certain faculty quality criteria.

The board of regents must annually report to the legislature’s higher education appropriations subcommittee on concurrent enrollment participation and growth, including data on what higher education tuition would have been charged for the hours of concurrent enrollment credit granted, and on any partial tuition paid by concurrent enrollment students not eligible for free-/reduced-price lunch.

The state board and board of regents must also annually report to the public education appropriations subcommittee an accounting of the money appropriated for concurrent enrollment, and a justification of the statutorily-established split of program funds between local boards/charter schools and the board of regents.

The board of regents must provide a requesting higher education institution that participates in concurrent enrollment a report listing each public high school student who was enrolled in a concurrent enrollment course and admitted to the requesting higher education institution, including the student’s name and unique identifier, the student’s school and district or charter school, the course name of each concurrent enrollment course taken by the student, the higher education institution from which the student took each course, all the credits the student earned in each concurrent enrollment course, and the courses in which a student earned a “C” or higher.
Program evaluation component Yes. The state board and the board of regents must work in close cooperation in evaluating the concurrent enrollment program.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes

Vermont
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs. The Dual Enrollment program includes college courses offered on the campus of an accredited postsecondary institution and on a secondary school campus, and may include online courses.

A secondary technical student may be enrolled in postsecondary technical courses if the enrollment is accepted by the postsecondary institution and approved by the district of residence as being in the student’s best interests.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Dual Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Dual Enrollment)
  • Virtual program (may be but is not required to be offered) (Dual Enrollment)
  • Not specified (Technical)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual Enrollment: Both. A student may but is not required to receive secondary credit for a course the district approved but did not pay for. A school district may not withhold approval or credit without reasonable justification.

Technical: Secondary credit. Programs must "provide an opportunity for" the student also to receive postsecondary credit, but policy does not specify that both high school and postsecondary credit are automatically awarded.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Dual Enrollment: Yes. A student enrolled in a Vermont career technical center is eligible to participate in dual enrollment programs.

Technical: Yes. A secondary technical student may be enrolled in postsecondary technical courses if the enrollment is accepted by the postsecondary institution and approved by the district of residence as being in the student’s best interests. The school board awarding graduation credits must consider the recommendation of the regional advisory board, regional technical center school district board, or any other authorized alternate governing board and must provide an opportunity for the secondary student also to receive postsecondary credit.
Unique characteristics Dual Enrollment: Private school students (to which the student's district of residence pays publicly funded tuition on the student’s behalf) and home-schooled students may also participate, as can a student in a public school in another state or an approved independent school that is designated as the public secondary school for the student's district of residence.

The Vermont State Colleges and the University of Vermont must work together to provide dual enrollment opportunities throughout the state.

Secondary schools must identify and provide necessary support for participating students and continue to provide services for students with disabilities, provide support for a seamless transition to postsecondary enrollment upon graduation.
The Vermont Agency of Education must manage or may contract for the management of the Dual Enrollment Program in Vermont by:
(1) Marketing the Dual Enrollment Program to students and their families
(2) Assisting secondary and postsecondary partners to develop memoranda of understanding, when requested
(3) Coordinating with secondary and postsecondary partners to understand and define student academic readiness
(4) Convening regular meetings of interested parties to explore and develop improved student support services
(5) Coordinating the use of technology to ensure access and coordination of the Program
(6) Reviewing program costs
(7) Evaluating all aspects of the Dual Enrollment Program and ensuring overall quality and accountability
(8) Performing other necessary or related duties.

The Secretary must develop, publish, and regularly update guidance, in the form of technical assistance, sharing of best practices and model documents, legal interpretations, and other support designed to help school districts provide students, beginning no later than in 7th grade, with career development and postsecondary planning resources to ensure they are able to take full advantage of flexible pathways to graduation opportunities, including dual enrollment.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Dual Enrollment: Mandatory

Technical: Voluntary
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Dual Enrollment: Both. A private institution accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges or another regional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education may also participate.

Technical: Two-year
Student eligibility requirements
  • Not specified (Technical)
  • Student in grades 11-12 (Dual Enrollment)
  • Other (Dual Enrollment). Dual enrollment must be element in the student's personalized learning plan. The secondary school and the postsecondary institution must also determine the student is sufficiently prepared to succeed in a dual enrollment course, which can be determined in part by the assessment tool or tools identified by the participating postsecondary institution.
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Dual Enrollment: Not set in state policy. However, one of the duties of the agency of education relative to the program is to convene regular meetings of interested parties to explore and develop improved student support services.

Technical: Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Dual Enrollment: An eligible student may enroll in up to 2 dual enrollment courses for which the student/parent are not required to pay tuition. District of student’s residence pays tuition—tuition rate is either 20% or 90% of Community College of Vermont rate depending on whether course is taught by secondary or postsecondary instructor. State pays 50% of tuition from the Next Generation Initiative Fund. A school district may enter into a contract to offer dual enrollment through a public or private postsecondary institution that is not affiliated with Vermont State Colleges or the University of Vermont; institution may be in or out of state. District may negotiate terms different from those set forth in statute, including the amount of tuition to be paid.

Once district has paid for two courses, student/parent is responsible for tuition. A school district may choose to pay for more than two courses per eligible student, but the state will not pay 50% of tuition for those additional courses.

Technical: District
How state funds participating high schools Not defined
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Not defined
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Dual Enrollment: Yes. When a course is offered at a high school, the public postsecondary institution must retain authority to determine course content and work with the secondary school to select, monitor, support, and evaluate instructors.

Technical: Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Dual Enrollment: Yes. The public postsecondary institution must send data related to student participation and success to the secretary of education and send data to the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation necessary for the Corporation's federal reporting requirements. The secretary must annually report to the house and senate education committees regarding the Dual Enrollment Program, including data relating to student demographics, levels of participation, marketing, and program success. (16 V.S.A. § 944(c)(3) and (j))

Technical: No
Program evaluation component Dual Enrollment: Yes. Each secondary school must collect enrollment data as prescribed by the secretary of education for longitudinal review and evaluation. In addition, one of the program duties of the Vermont Agency of Education is to evaluate all aspects of the program and ensure overall quality and accountability.

Technical: No
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Unclear

Virginia
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program Dual Enrollment
Where courses provided
  • At high school (for some community college courses)
  • At postsecondary institution
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit No
CTE component Yes. CTE regulations provide that a “program of study” or “plan of study” may include the opportunity for students to participate in dual or concurrent enrollment programs or other ways to acquire postsecondary education credits.
Unique characteristics Home schooled students may also participate. (While private school students' participation is not governed by statute, regulations, or the Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment, some colleges do allow private school students to take dual enrollment courses.)

Through the Virginia Index of Performance (VIP) incentive program, the state board recognizes schools and school divisions that are annually increasing student enrollment in dual enrollment, AP or IB courses toward the state goal of 30%. An increase toward this goal earns a high school one VIP bonus point for the Board of Education Distinguished Achievement Award or Board of Education Excellence Award, and meets state goal for Governor’s Award for Educational Excellence.

Students who complete the requirements for an Advanced Studies Diploma or Advanced Technical Diploma with an average grade of “B” or better, and successfully complete college-level coursework that will earn the student at least nine transferable college credits in dual enrollment or other options receive the Governor's Seal on the diploma.

Dual enrollment courses do not count toward accumulation of the 125% credit hour threshold, after which a postsecondary student who continues to be enrolled after completed 125% of the credit hours needed to satisfy the degree requirements for a specified undergraduate program is charged a surcharge for each additional semester enrolled.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Mandatory. All local boards must implement an agreement for postsecondary attainment with a community college, specifying the options for students to complete an associate's degree or a one-year Uniform Certificate of General Studies concurrent with a high school diploma. The agreement must specify the credit available for dual enrollment and Advanced Placement courses.

In addition, students must have access to at least three college-level courses for degree credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or Cambridge courses, or any combination thereof.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both. In addition, each public institution of higher education must commit to the governor and the general assembly to offer dual enrollment programs in cooperation with high schools.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From high school principal
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12 (for community colleges)
  • Other (for community colleges: parental permission, and achieving minimum score on English/writing, reading, and math on the Virginia Placement Test (VPT), Compass, Asset, PSAT, SAT, ACT, or SOL)
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Yes. All local boards must have a plan to notify students and their parents of the availability of dual enrollment and Advanced Placement classes, the International Baccalaureate Program, and Academic Year Governor's School Programs, and the qualifications for enrolling in such classes and programs. This plan must include notification to students and parents of the agreement with a Virginia community college to enable students to complete an associate's degree or a one-year Uniform Certificate of General Studies concurrent with a high school diploma.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Local decision. However, schools and colleges are encouraged to provide dual enrollment opportunities at no cost to students or their families.

In October 2013, the Advisory Council of Community College Presidents approved a policy on tuition payment for students in VCCS dual enrollment courses taught in the high school by a high school teacher with appropriate VCCS credentials to teach the college course. Under the policy, to be implemented no later than the 2015-2016 school year, full tuition and fees must be paid the community college, but the minimum amount to be reimbursed the school division is 60%. Dual enrollment reimbursement rates may be increased up to 100% based on specified options.

Dual-enrollment high school students who have not previously received a Virginia Guaranteed Assistance Program (VGAP) award must be considered for an initial VGAP award provided they meet all of the initial award eligibility requirements.

Any high school student not otherwise qualified for in-state tuition who is enrolled in community college courses for high school and community college credit pursuant to an agreement between the high school and community college must be charged the same tuition as is charged to any Virginia resident.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for community college courses. Colleges must ensure that all dual enrollment courses are equivalent to the other instruction offered by the college, in terms of course objectives, course syllabi, level and rigor of content, evaluation of students, textbooks, student outcomes and assessment and faculty evaluation.

Faculty must be selected and employed by the participating community college and must meet SACS [Southern Association of Colleges and Schools] and state board for community colleges faculty hiring criteria (SACS requires faculty teaching associate degree courses designed for transfer to four-year institutions to hold a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the discipline).

All dual enrollment arrangements under the Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment must include formal mechanisms to evaluate faculty effectiveness and student success. Dual enrollment instructors must be evaluated using the guidelines adopted for all adjunct faculty members. A copy of the evaluation results must be given to the designated district representative. Student evaluations of all dual enrollment adjunct instructors must be held each semester for each course offered. Student evaluation results must be shared with the dean, program lead, faculty member, and designated district representative.
Program reporting requirement Yes. Each secondary school’s School Performance Report Card must include the percentage of students who take college-level courses, including dual enrollment courses.
Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Washington
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has multiple programs:

Dual Credit is generally defined as a program, administered by either an institution of higher education, a high school, or contractual agreement between the two, through which 11th and 12th graders apply to a participating institution of higher education to enroll in courses or programs and simultaneously earn high school and college credit.

Running Start allows students to apply to a participating institution of higher education to enroll in courses or programs offered by the institution.

College in the High School programs, governed by a local contract between the district and the institution of higher education, allow students to earn high school and college credit.

Community and technical colleges may contract with local common school districts to provide occupational and academic programs for high school students.

The state also has a participation in high school completion pilot program that allows a student under age 21 who has completed all graduation requirements except exit exam requirements to enroll in courses or a program of study made available by a participating community or technical college.

Unless otherwise noted, policies in this profile refer to dual credit generally, Running Start, or College in the High School.
Where courses provided Dual Credit:
  • Not specified
Running Start:
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution
  • Virtual program. Students may take Running Start, University of Washington extension, Washington Online, and other online programs for college credit.
College in the High School:
  • Not specified
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned All programs: Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Running Start: No

College in the High School: Not set in state policy
CTE component  Dual Credit generally : Yes. Community and technical colleges are required to establish agreements with high schools and skill centers to offer dual high school and college credit for secondary CTE courses, and may create dual credit agreements with high schools and skill centers located outside the college district boundary or service area. If a community or technical college has created an agreement with a high school or skill center to offer college credit for a secondary CTE course, all community and technical colleges must accept the course for an equal amount of college credit. All approved preparatory secondary CTE programs must either allow students to earn dual credit for high school and college through Tech Prep, Advanced Placement, or other agreements or programs, or lead to a certificate or credential that is state or nationally recognized by trades, industries, or other professional associations as necessary for employment or advancement in that field.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction, the workforce training and education coordinating board, the state board for community and technical colleges, and the council of presidents shall work with local school districts, workforce education programs in colleges, tech prep consortia, and four-year institutions of higher education to develop model career and technical education programs of study, by definition, include opportunities for students to earn dual high school and college credit.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must develop and conduct an ongoing CTE campaign to increase awareness among teachers, counselors, students, parents, principals, school administrators, and the general public about the opportunities offered by rigorous CTE programs. Messages in the campaign must emphasize CTE as a high quality educational pathway for students, including for students who seek advanced education that includes a bachelor's degree or beyond. The office must include in the campaign information about CTE course equivalencies and dual credit for high school and college.

Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the superintendent of public instruction must periodically review and approve district CTE plans. To receive approval, a district plan must demonstrate that approved CTE programs maximize opportunities for students to earn dual credit for high school and college. The office of the superintendent of public instruction is also required to establish performance measures and targets and monitor the performance of CTE programs in specified areas, including students earning dual credit for high school and college. If a school district fails to meet the performance targets, the office of the superintendent of public instruction may require the district to submit an improvement plan. If a district fails to implement an improvement plan or continues to fail to meet the performance targets for three consecutive years, the office of the superintendent of public instruction may use this failure as the basis to deny the approval or reapproval of one or more of the district's CTE programs.

Running Start: Yes. Students may enroll in vocational or nonvocational coursework.
 
Unique characteristics Running Start: Home-schooled and private school students may also participate. Once a pupil has been enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student. Once a pupil has been enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student.

A community or technical college may issue a high school diploma or certificate. A Running Start participant who completes an associate’s degree must be awarded a high school diploma from the college upon written request from the student.

Dual credit generally: 2013 H.B. 1642 encourages each local board to adopt an academic acceleration policy for high school students, under which the district automatically enrolls each student who meets the state standard on the high school statewide student assessment in the next most rigorous level of advanced courses offered by the high school. Students who successfully complete such an advanced course are then enrolled in the next most rigorous advanced course, with the objective that students will eventually be automatically enrolled in courses that offer the opportunity to earn dual credit for high school and college. Districts must notify students and parents regarding the academic acceleration policy and the advanced courses available to students, and provide parents an opportunity to opt out of the academic acceleration policy and enroll a student in an alternative course.

The 2013 legislation, subject to appropriation of funds, also establishes the academic acceleration incentive program, to award funds to support teacher training, curriculum, technology, examination fees, and other costs associated with offering dual credit courses (i.e., College in the High School, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Examination (AICE), Tech Prep, online courses). Running Start students do not generate an incentive award. Half of appropriated funds must be awarded via competitive grants on a one-time basis for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. (To be eligible, districts must have adopted an academic acceleration policy.) Priority in awarding grants must be given high schools with a high proportion of low-income students, and high schools seeking to develop new capacity for dual credit courses rather than proposing marginal expansion of current capacity. The remaining half of funds must be awarded districts as an incentive award for each student who earned dual credit for courses offered by the district’s high schools in the previous school year. Districts must distribute the award to the high schools that generated the funds. The award amount for free- and reduced-price lunch students who earn dual credits must be set at 125% of the base award for other students. A student who earns more than one dual credit in the same school year counts only once for the purposes of the incentive award. The office of the superintendent of public instruction must report to the education policy committees and the fiscal committees of the legislature, by January 1st of each year, information about the demographics of the students earning dual credits in the schools receiving grants under this section for the prior school year.

Institutions of higher education are encouraged to review their policies and procedures regarding financial aid for students enrolled in dual credit programs (i.e., programs administered by a high school or postsecondary institution for 11th and 12th graders to enroll in an institution’s courses or programs and earn high school and college credit). Institutions are also encouraged to implement policies and procedures providing students enrolled in dual credit programs with the same access to institutional aid, including all educational expenses, as provided to resident undergraduate students.

Each institution of higher education, including technical colleges, must deposit a minimum of 3 ½% of revenues collected from tuition and services and activities fees in a locally-held institutional financial aid fund. Moneys in the fund must be used only for specified purposes, including to provide financial aid to high school students enrolled in dual credit programs. Moneys from this fund may be used for all educational expenses related to a student's participation in a dual credit program including tuition, fees, course materials, and transportation.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must compile information about online learning programs for high school students to earn college credit and place the information on its website. Examples of information to be compiled and placed on the website include links to purveyors of online learning programs, comparisons among various types of programs regarding costs or awarding of credit, advantages and disadvantages of online learning programs, and other general assistance and guidance for students, teachers, and counselors in selecting and considering online learning programs. The office must use the expertise of its Digital Learning Department and Washington Online to provide assistance and suggest resources.

The superintendent of public instruction and the office of student financial assistance must develop advising guidelines to assure that students and parents understand that college credits earned in high school dual credit programs may impact eligibility for financial aid.

A high school that demonstrates improvement in its dropout prevention score in comparison to baseline school year may receive a PASS program award. The office of the superintendent of public instruction must determine the amount of PASS program awards based on appropriated funds and eligible high school, to provide an award to each eligible high school commensurate with the degree of improvement in the high school's dropout prevention score and the high school’s size. A high school must use 90% of an award for dropout prevention activities, which the school principal must determine after consultation with parents and certified school staff. Among the activities for which a school may use PASS funds are (1) Outreach and counseling to students identified as at risk of dropping out of school, or who have dropped out of school, to encourage them to consider alternatives such as running start and other options for completing a high school diploma, and (2) Preapprenticeship programs or running start for the trades initiatives.

Districts in Washington and community colleges in Idaho and Oregon may enter into cooperative agreements to allow 11th and 12th grade students to earn high school and postsecondary credit. Such agreements must adhere to RCW 28A.600.310 through .360 and 28A.600.380 through .400. A district agreement may allow the community college to accept an amount less than the statewide uniform rate set in RCW 28A.600.310(2) if the community college does not charge students tuition and fees. To the extent feasible, such agreements must permit students to attend the community college without paying tuition or fees. Agreements may not permit community colleges to charge nonresident tuition and fee rates. Agreements must ensure that students may enroll only in courses transferable to the Washington two-year, tribal and select four-year institutions from which students in traditional dual enrollment programs would earn postsecondary credits.

The state’s Student Achievement Council must collaborate with the appropriate state agencies and stakeholders, including the state board of education, the office of the superintendent of public instruction, the state board for community and technical colleges, the workforce training and education coordinating board, and the four-year institutions of higher education to improve student transitions and success including recommending policies that require coordination between or among sectors such as dual high school-college programs, and awarding college credit for advanced high school work.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary All programs: Voluntary

Dual Credit generally: While offering of dual credit is voluntary, 2013 legislation encourages each local board to adopt an academic acceleration policy for high school students, under which the district automatically enrolls each student who meets the state standard on the high school statewide student assessment in the next most rigorous level of advanced courses offered by the high school. Students who successfully complete such an advanced course are then enrolled in the next most rigorous advanced course, with the objective that students will eventually be automatically enrolled in courses that offer the opportunity to earn dual credit for high school and college. The legislation provides funds
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Dual Credit: Both

Running Start: Two-year and select four-year institutions if the governing board decides to participate (Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Washington State University, and the Evergreen State College are authorized. The Evergreen State College does not participate at this time). Accredited tribal colleges may also participate.

College in the High School: Both. Accredited tribal colleges may also participate.
Student eligibility requirements Dual Credit:
  • Not specified
Running Start:
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution
  • Student in grades 11-12
College in the High School:
  • Not specified. The high school and institution of higher education together define student eligibility criteria.
  • Student in grades 11-12
Cap on number of credits students may earn Running Start: Yes. Running Start dollars will fund no more than a maximum of 15 quarter credits (1.0 FTE) per term, assuming no more than .2 FTE enrollment in the high school. A student first enrolling in grade 11 may not take more than the equivalent of two years' coursework; a student first enrolling in grade 12 may not take more than the equivalent of one year's coursework.

College in the High School: Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Programs generally: Yes. Each high school and any other school serving grade 9 must deliver to each parent of a student in any grades 9-12 information about entrance requirements and availability of local programs offering college credit, including Running Start, College in the High School, Advanced Placement, Tech-Prep, skill centers, and International Baccalaureate programs. The information may be included with other information the school regularly mails to parents. In addition, each senior high school and any other public school that includes 9th grade must include the names and contact information of other public or private entities offering such programs to its 9th through 12th grade students if the school has knowledge of such entities.

In addition, high schools must ensure that parents and students have opportunities to learn about online learning programs, such as Running Start, University of Washington extension, Washington Online, and other programs and providers that meet qualifications to offer courses that high schools may accept for credit toward graduation requirements or that offer courses generally accepted for credit by public institutions of higher education in Washington. High schools must also ensure teachers and counselors have information about these online learning programs and are able to assist parents and students in accessing the information.

Running Start: Yes. Districts must provide general information about Running Start to all students in grades 10-12 and to their parents, including information about the opportunity to enroll in the program through online courses available at community and technical colleges and other state institutions of higher education.

College in the High School: Yes. Participating districts must provide general information about the College in the High School program to all students in grades 10-12 and to those students’ parents.
Counseling/advising is made available to students Running Start: Yes. Institutions of higher education, in collaboration with relevant student associations, must aim for students who can benefit from fee waivers for low-income students to take advantage of these waivers. Institutions must make every effort to communicate to students/families the benefits of the waivers and provide assistance to students/families on how to apply. To the greatest extent possible, institutions must: (1) Incorporate information about waivers into financial aid counseling, admission information, and individual billing statements, and (2) use all means of communication, including web sites, online catalogues, admission and registration forms, mass e-mail messaging, social media, and outside marketing to ensure that information about waivers is visible, compelling, and reaches the maximum number of eligible students and families.

College in the High School: Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Running Start: Combination of state and student/parent, although funds paid by the state through districts are not deemed tuition or operating fees. The superintendent of public instruction allocates funds appropriated for basic education to school districts for purposes of making payments to postsecondary institutions, and for granting school districts 7% thereof to offset program related costs. Each participating district transmits to the institution of higher education an amount per each full-time equivalent college student at statewide uniform rates for vocational and nonvocational students. The superintendent of public instruction, participating institutions of higher education, and the state board for community and technical colleges shall consult on the calculation and distribution of the funds.

At community or technical colleges, in lieu of tuition and fees, students pay all other mandatory fees. The state board for community and technical colleges may authorize a fee of up to 10% of tuition and fees. All other institutions of higher education may charge students a fee of up to 10% of tuition and fees, in addition to technology fees, in lieu of tuition and fees. In both instances, fees must be prorated based on credit load.

Institutions must make fee waivers available to low-income students, and establish written policies to determine low-income students before offering the fee waiver. Institutions must make every effort to communicate to students and their families the benefits of the waivers and provide assistance to students and their families on how to apply. Information about waivers must, to the greatest extent possible, be incorporated into financial aid counseling, admission information, and individual billing statements. Institutions also must, to the greatest extent possible, use all means of communication, including websites, online catalogues, admission and registration forms, mass e-mail messaging, social media, and outside marketing to ensure that information about waivers is visible, compelling, and reaches the maximum number of eligible students and families.

In 2018, the joint legislative audit and review committee must complete a systematic performance audit of the tuition-setting authority granted to the governing boards of four-year public institutions of higher education, in order to evaluate the impact of institutional tuition-setting authority on student access, affordability, and institutional quality. The audit must include an evaluation of the various outcomes for each four-year institution of higher education, including changes in enrollments in the Running Start and other dual enrollment programs. The audit must also include recommendations on whether to continue tuition-setting authority beyond the 2018-19 academic year. In conducting the audit, the auditor must solicit input from key higher education stakeholders, including students and their families.

College in the High School: Not specified. The institution of higher education may charge tuition to participating students.
How state funds participating high schools Running Start: Reduced funding

College in the High School: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Running Start: Reduced funding. The college receives 93% of basic education funding for teh portion of eligible FTE, with 7% retained by local school districts to offset program-related costs.

College in the High School: Not specified
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Running Start: Courses taught by postsecondary faculty

College in the High School: Yes. Full-time and part-time faculty at institutions of higher education, including adjunct faculty, are eligible to teach program courses.
Program reporting requirement All programs: Yes. The office of the superintendent of public instruction, in collaboration with the state board for community and technical colleges, the Washington state apprenticeship and training council, the workforce training and education coordinating board, the student achievement council, the public baccalaureate institutions, and the education data center must annually report to the education and higher education committees of the legislature regarding participation in dual credit programs (including but not limited to Running Start, College in the High School, Tech Prep, International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement, and Cambridge program. The report must include:
  • Data on student participation rates and academic performance
  • Data on the total unduplicated head count of students enrolled in at least one dual credit program course
  • The percentage of students who enrolled in at least one dual credit program as percent of all students enrolled in grades 9-12.
Data must be disaggregated by race/ethnicity, gender, and receipt of free/reduced-price lunch.

The office of the superintendent of public instruction must also annually report to the education policy committees and the fiscal committees of the legislature, information about the demographics of the students earning dual credits in the schools receiving grants for the prior school year through the academic acceleration program, to support costs associated with offering dual credit courses (i.e., College in the High School, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Examination (AICE), Tech Prep, online courses) Running Start students do not generate an incentive grant award but are included in annual reports.

In addition to the data on student enrollment in dual credit courses mentioned above, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must collect and post on the Washington state report card website the rates at which students earn college credit through a dual credit course (i.e., 3 or higher on AP exam, 4 or higher on IB exam, students who successfully complete a Cambridge advanced international certificate of education (AICE) exam, students who successfully complete a course through the College in the High School program, students who satisfy the dual enrollment and class performance requirements to earn college credit through a Tech Prep course, and students who successfully complete a Running Start course.

College in the High School: The institution of higher education must maintain participant enrollment information separately from other enrollment information. The institution may not include enrollees in official enrollment reports, nor may such persons be considered in any enrollment statistics that would affect higher education budgetary determinations.

Program evaluation component All programs: Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Running Start: Yes. Running Start courses in the general transfer agreement are recognized in the same manner as traditional postsecondary courses. However, each public instiution in the state varies in general distribution requirements.

College in the High School: Not set in state policy

West Virginia
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has three programs: Dual Credit and Dual Enrollment courses both mean a credit-bearing college course offered at a high school by an institution of higher education. The West Virginia EDGE (Earn a Degree, Graduate Early) allows students to take approved career/technical courses offered by high schools or Career and Technical Centers that are common to courses offered by the community and technical colleges for college credit. Students earn credit by passing a qualifying exam. Early Enrollment (a.k.a. Early Entrance) allows public two- and four-year institutions to offer college courses delivered primarily to high school students.

In addition, the state provides for early admission, defined as high school students enrolled in a college-level course. Policies pertaining to early admission are not included here.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Early Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Early Enrollment)
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and West Virginia EDGE: Both

Early Enrollment: Postsecondary credit. High schools determine if high school credit is offered for these courses.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit All programs: No
CTE component Yes. Bridgemont Community and Technical College, Mountwest Community and Technical College, Pierpont Community and Technical College, and Kanawha Valley Community and Technical College are authorized to deliver technical courses that are part of a certificate or associate degree program as early entrance or dual credit courses.

The West Virginia EDGE program is entirely for CTE courses. The presidents of the community and technical colleges facilitate the formation of community and technical college/career and technical education consortia. Each consortium includes representatives of community and technical colleges, public career and technical education centers and state baccalaureate institutions offering associate degrees. Each consortium is responsible for increasing the integration of secondary and post-secondary curriculum and programs that are targeted to meet regional labor market needs, including implementing seamless programs of study such as West Virginia EDGE. In addition, each consortium must develop a compact outlining strategies and procedures for achieving stated goals. Each compact must include implementation of the West Virginia EDGE Program.
Unique characteristics Dual Credit: A system of points on an index is used to assess annual performance measures for state accreditation of high schools and approval of school systems. For schools and districts that do not meet AYP, bonus points or credits are awarded for advanced placement percentages, dual credit completers and international baccalaureate completers. A high school is awarded exemplary accreditation status when all of a number of performance measures are met, including that the percentage of students who successfully complete Advanced Placement, dual credit, and honors classes is at least 5%.

Early Enrollment and Dual Credit: The total headcount enrollment in early admission and dual credit courses is a performance indicator for community and technical colleges.

West Virginia EDGE: The Community and Technical College District Planning Consortium must annually review the approved EDGE course listing to ensure the accuracy of information provided to students and parents.

Courses at postsecondary campuses generally: High schools are permitted to make “take-out” lunches for students attending college programs, and claim such lunches for reimbursement. Provision of such lunches is at the discretion of SFAs (School Food Authority, or governing body that is responsible for the administration of one or more schools and has the legal authority to operate a breakfast or lunch program).
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Early Enrollment: Voluntary. However, state two-year colleges and four-year colleges and universities are directed to work collaboratively with schools to increase educational opportunities and standards for potential college students. Among these efforts are institutional initiatives to provide more opportunities for high school students to complete college courses.

West Virginia EDGE: Mandatory
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Both

West Virginia EDGE: 2-year

Early Enrollment: Both
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation (Early Enrollment)
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution (Early Enrollment)
  • Student in grades 11-12 ((West Virginia EDGE and Early Enrollment)
  • Not specified (Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment)
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition All programs: Student/parent, district or 3rd party

Dual Credit: In practice, varies from county to county – some counties pay the tuition in other counties the student pays the tuition, however the tuition is at a reduced cost.

West Virginia EDGE: Postsecondary institution

Early Enrollment: Student/parent. However, to increase access, an institution may establish a special tuition structure for high school students, which must be set at at least three-fourths of the rate of the lowest regular off-campus rate established by any West Virginia public higher education institution. All high school students must be charged the special tuition or the regular tuition/fees approved for the institution granting the credit. The credit-granting institution may not use its own resources to pay any student's assessed tuition/fees. Except for tuition/fee waivers in third party sponsored agreements, no tuition/fee waivers are to be granted.
How state funds participating high schools Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Students are funded at a higher level. County boards get an additional 1% of the average PPOR (per pupil operating revenue) X # of students enrolled in dual credit or other advanced courses (AP/IB).

West Virginia EDGE: Equal

Early Enrollment: Equal, with qualifications. When a high school teacher teaches an early enrollment course during the regular school day the institution granting the credit may reimburse the high school/county board of education for the instructor's service.
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions All programs: Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes, for all programs.

Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Early Enrollment: A dual credit course must meet both the specified course content standards and objectives for secondary offerings and the college course requirements.

West Virginia EDGE: Career and technical centers and high schools must submit secondary course or technical program content standards and objectives (CSOs) to community and technical colleges (CTC) for evaluation and alignment with specific CTC course learner outcomes for validation for EDGE credit. Appropriate secondary level teachers and/or department of education personnel must participate in the evaluation, alignment and EDGE credit validation process with CTC faculty and academic administrators. If a state and/or national certification exam is available and required by the secondary school or career-technical center, such certification exams must be deemed as sufficient documentation that students passing these exams meet CTC course learning outcomes, and must be approved for EDGE credit. In the absence of a state/national certification exam, secondary teachers work with CTC faculty to determine if the CSOs of the secondary technical course match the learning outcomes of the CTC course. If a secondary course is approved for EDGE credit by this means, the secondary teacher agrees, as part of the validation process, to document that the high school student has achieved the appropriate skill level for awarding EDGE credit. EDGE course teachers must also attend the EDGE orientation led by the Tech Prep Consortium Coordinator. Regulations also detail the college responsibilities in ensuring the quality of EDGE courses.

Early Enrollment: A course must meet the same rigorous standards as those required for on-campus instruction, to maintain institutional accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association and to assure institutional credibility. Courses must utilize college-approved syllabi, texts, assignments and assessments. Faculty for these courses will be evaluated by college personnel using the same processes as for other college faculty. The higher education institution must facilitate communication between the appropriate academic department and the early enrollment faculty member to assure quality. Faculty teaching early enrollment courses must meet the minimum faculty credential requirements as specified by the college and as approved by the department and chief academic officer of the college or university. The institution must assign adjunct/part-time faculty status to high school teachers teaching college courses. Employment of any early enrollment adjunct/part-time faculty must be consistent with any institutional, statewide and regional accreditation standards for employment of adjunct/part-time faculty.
Program reporting requirement Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: No

West Virginia EDGE: Yes. The program is administered by the Assistant State Superintendent of the Division of Technical, Adult and Institutional Education, who must develop or adapt an existing comprehensive relational database and data analysis system for student tracking to ensure consistent, reliable data relevant to program goals are available. The assistant state superintendent must also track and evaluate EDGE outcomes across all eight community and technical college/career and technical education consortia districts and create a standardized reporting procedure for collecting consistent EDGE data at the state level. He/she must also (1) document the number of students who enroll in the program, specific courses taken, student course and final exam grades, the number who earn EDGE credits and, of these, the number who apply the credits toward degrees or certifications at state community and technical colleges, and (2) collect and analyze data relevant to initiative goals and objectives, and prepare an annual report for the Legislative Oversight Commission on Education Accountability.

The Chancellor's Office and individual two-year institutions must maintain an up-to-date listing of all secondary and/or career-technical center courses approved for EDGE credit, including the amount of credit for each course, and make this listing available through links from the system and institutional websites to the EDGE website maintained by the department of education.

Early Enrollment: Yes. Each participating institution must maintain a record of the courses and enrollments for such courses and submit reports in compliance with requirements set forth by the specifications of the WV Data Policy Advisory Council, the Council for Community and Technical College Education and Higher Education Policy Commission.
Program evaluation component Yes, for West Virginia EDGE. The purpose of the annual data report described under “Institutional Reporting Requirement” is to analyze program outcomes to demonstrate to what degree the initiative has met goals and objectives articulated in statute.
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits No

Wisconsin
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has five programs that fall under the umbrella of dual enrollment or concurrent enrollment:

The Youth Options program allows students in grades 11 and 12 not enrolled in a technical college to enroll in an institution of higher education.

Course Options, created by 2013 Act 20, extends existing open enrollment policy to students seeking admission at a public or nonprofit postsecondary institution or tribal college.

Section 118.15(1)(b) of the schools code permits a student who is at least 16 or is an at-risk student to attend a technical college in lieu of high school or on a part-time basis if the student and parent agree in writing that the student will participate in a program leading to his/her high school graduation. The district board of the technical college district in which the child resides must admit the child. Every technical college district board must offer day class programs satisfactory to meet the requirements of these provisions to receive state aid.

Section 118.55(7r) of the schools code is in the same section of code as the Youth Options program, but is considered a separate program for purposes of this analysis due to differing program eligibility requirements, processes, etc. Section 118.55(7r) allows a student in good academic standing who is not an at-risk student to enroll in a technical college.

Dual Enrollment programs are programs or courses of study designed to provide high school students the opportunity to gain credits in both technical college and high school, including transcripted credit programs or other educational services provided by contract between a school district and a technical college.
Where courses provided Youth Options:
  • At high school
  • At postsecondary institution. Courses taught primarily at postsecondary institution.
Course Options and Section 118.15(1)(b): At postsecondary institution

Dual Enrollment: Not specified. In practice, courses are typically by high school teachers in the high school.

Section 118.55(7r): At postsecondary institution

UW Colleges Online offers courses for high school/college credit.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Youth Options: Not specified. On the application submitted to the institution of higher education, the pupil must specify whether he or she will be taking the course or courses for high school credit or postsecondary credit. A district must determine whether the course is comparable to a course offered in the school district, whether the course satisfies any of the high school graduation requirements, and the number of high school credits to award the pupil for the course, if any. A district must grant high school credit if the postsecondary course meets any high school graduation requirements. Administrative code identifies additional conditions under which a district may approve or deny awarding high school credit for a course.

Course Options: Not specified

Section 118.15(1)(b): Postsecondary only. Courses taken at a technical college through this program do not fulfill high school graduation requirements unless the state superintendent has approved the course for that purpose.

Dual Enrollment: Both

Section 118.55(7r): Not specified. Postsecondary credit is awarded. The student’s local board must notify the student if a course does not meet the high school graduation requirements and whether the course is comparable to a course offered in the school district. If the pupil disagrees with the school board's decision regarding comparability of courses or satisfaction of high school graduation requirements, the pupil may appeal the school board's decision to the state superintendent.
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit All programs but 118.55(7r): Not set in state policy

118.55(7r): No
CTE component Yes. “Dual enrollment programs” are programs or courses of study designed to provide high school students the opportunity to gain credits in both technical college and high school, including transcripted credit programs or other educational services provided by contract between a school district and a technical college. (38.28(1m)(am)) Course Options, 118.15(1)(b), and 118.55(7r) also allow students to enroll in a technical college.
Unique characteristics Dual Enrollment: 2013 Act 20 (A.B. 40) directs the technical college system board to establish a formula for allocating an amount to each technical college district based on a district's performance in the 3 previous fiscal years on specified criteria, including participation in dual enrollment programs.
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Youth Options: Unclear

Course Options: Voluntary. If an institution rejects an application, it must include in the notice the reason for the rejection. In addition, a school board must reject a student’s application if the board determines the course conflicts with the student’s individualized education program, and may reject the application if the board determines the course does not satisfy a high school graduation requirement, or does not conform to or support the student’s academic and career plan.

Section 118.15(1)(b): Mandatory

Dual Enrollment: Voluntary

118.55(7r): Voluntary. A school board may refuse to permit a pupil to attend a technical college if the pupil is a child with a disability, and the board determines that the cost would impose an undue financial burden on the school district. A technical college district board may reject an application from a pupil with a record of disciplinary problems, as determined by the district board.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Youth Options and Course Options: Both. Private, nonprofit institutions and tribal colleges may also participate.

Section 118.15(1)(b), Dual Enrollment, and Section 118.55(7r): 2-year
Student eligibility requirements Youth Options:
  • Student in grades 11-12.
  • Other. May not be attending a technical college through 118.55(7r) or 118.15(1)(b)
Course Options:
  • Not specified. A student’s parent submits an application to the educational institution on a form provided by the department.
Section 118.15(1)(b):
  • Other. Student must be a Wisconsin resident (or a nonresident, and district board of attendance approves the enrollment), be at least 16 or an at-risk student, and student and parent must agree in writing that the student will participate in a program leading to his/her high school graduation. A technical college district board may admit a student under age 16 if the student is a Wisconsin resident or approved nonresident, has parent’s written permission, will not be attending the technical college district school during the normal school day.
Dual Enrollment: Not specified

118.55(7r):
  • Written approval/recommendation. Written approval of parent.
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must meet course prerequisites.
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Pupil who is not a child at risk, who is in good academic standing and who notifies board of intent to attend a technical college by specified date
Cap on number of credits students may earn Youth Options and 118.55(7r): Yes. A school board may adopt a policy limiting the number of credits the board will pay for to the equivalent of 18 postsecondary semester credits per pupil. A postsecondary institution’s admissions policies may not restrict the number of courses a student takes.

Course Options: Yes. A student may attend no more than 2 courses at any time.

Dual Enrollment: Not set in state policy

Section 118.15(1)(b): No — student may enroll as part- or full-time student.
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities Youth Options and 118.55(7r): Yes. Each board must provide information about programs to all students in grades 9-11.

All other programs: No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Youth Options and 118.55(7r): Limited. A local board must inform the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian if the pupil's timetable for graduation may be negatively affected if the student participates in the program.

All other programs: Not set in state policy
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Youth Options: If a course is taken for high school credit and is not comparable to a course offered by the district:

If student attends an institution in the University of Wisconsin system: School district pays the actual cost of tuition, fees, books and other necessary materials directly related to the course. If the student attends a private institution, the district pays the lesser of (1) The actual cost of tuition, fees, books and other necessary materials, or (2) An amount determined by dividing the state total net cost of the general fund in the previous school year by the state total membership in the previous school year, dividing that quotient by the statewide average number of high school credits taken by full-time pupils in the previous school year, as determined by the state superintendent, and multiplying that quotient by the number of high school credits taken by the pupil at the private institution of higher education.

A student is not responsible for any portion of tuition or fees for a course taken for high school credit if the local board has determined the course is not comparable to a course offered in the school district. However, a student is responsible for tuition and fees if the local board determines the course is comparable to a course offered in the district.

Youth Options and Section 118.55(7r): A student taking a course for postsecondary credit only is responsible for all course costs. If a student fails a course or does not complete a course, the student or parent must reimburse the local board for the amount paid on the student’s behalf. If the amount is not reimbursed, the student is ineligible for any further participation in the program.

Course Options: The district pays the cost of providing the course, calculated in a manner determined by the department. The institution may not charge or receive from the student or district any additional payment.

Section 118.15(1)(b) and Dual Enrollment: Student/parent

Section 118.55(7r) only: School district pays tuition, books and course fees for courses that are taken for high school credit; a pupil is not responsible for any portion of tuition or fees for a course taken for high school credit. The district is not responsible for charges for any courses comparable to courses offered in the school district. If the student is a child with a disability, the payment must be adjusted to reflect the cost of any special services required for the pupil.
How state funds participating high schools All programs: Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions All programs but 118.55(7r): Not defined

118.55(7r): Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Not set in state policy
Program reporting requirement Youth Options, 118.15(1)(b), and 118.55(7r): Yes. A common or union high school district must file a verified annual school district report with the department, which must include the students attending a technical college under s. 118.15(1)(b) and an institution of higher education or a technical college under Youth Options, or a technical college under 118.55(7r).

Course Options and Dual Enrollment: Not set in state policy

Section 118.15(1)(b) and 118.55(7r): The technical college system board must, in consultation with the state superintendent, develop a uniform format for district boards to use in reporting the number of pupils attending district schools under section 118.15(1)(b) and 118.55(7r). The technical college system board must annually report to the department of administration, department of children and families, department of public instruction, and department of workforce development, and to the legislature, by school district:
  • The number of pupils who attended district schools under ss. 118.15(1)(b) and 118.55(7r)
  • The type and number of credits earned
  • The number of persons who applied for admission to a technical college in the previous school year, who previously earned technical college credit under s. 118.55(7r) and who applied for admission within one year of graduating from high school
  • The courses given in high schools for which a pupil may receive technical college credit and the number of pupils enrolled in the courses for technical college credit in the previous school year.
  • Any other information considered relevant by the board.

The Milwaukee board must file a verified annual report with the department, which must include the number of students attending a technical college under Section 118.15(1)(b), disaggregated by school, grade, gender and ethnicity.

Program evaluation component Not set in state policy
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Not specified

Wyoming
Program Basics
Statewide policy in place Yes
Definition or title of program State has two programs. Statute provides for the offering of "post secondary education enrollment options." Two avenues for student participation fall under that term. A Concurrent Enrollment course is taught by a high school instructor approved as community college adjunct faculty, and teaching said course as part of their duties as a district employee. Dual Enrollment credit is given to high school students who complete college-level courses for which the community college hires and pays the instructor, and in which the school district agrees to allow high school credit.
Where courses provided
  • At high school (Concurrent Enrollment)
  • At postsecondary institution (Dual Enrollment)
  • Virtual program
  • Other. An off-campus center or at a site meeting safety and accessibility requirements under the instruction of a faculty member, or a higher education center that is part of a college outreach cooperative education services agreement entered into by one or more community college districts and one or more school districts, or a facility other than a high school maintained by the school district.
Postsecondary and/or secondary credit earned Both
Students may take developmental/remedial coursework for dual credit Not set in state policy
CTE component Yes. A district may apply to the department of education for state funds to plan, develop, and implement a career-technical education demonstration project as a new or an expansion to any existing high school career-vocational education program in the district. Funds for two-year implementation of demonstration projects must, among other purposes, provide opportunities for work-based learning and dual enrollment in related post secondary courses.
Unique characteristics Distance education grant funds are available to assist school districts, community colleges, and the University of Wyoming with developing distance education course(s), including dual enrollment courses, available from the WSN (Wyoming Switchboard Network).
Access
Offering mandatory or voluntary Voluntary. However, while offering is not mandated for every district, each school board, in conjunction with the University of Wyoming, community college boards, or other accredited postsecondary institutions must make postsecondary education options programs reasonably accessible to eligible students.
College partners can be 2-year/4-year/both Both options: Both. Other accredited postsecondary institutions may also participate. The University of Wyoming offers dual enrollment.
Student eligibility requirements
  • Written approval/recommendation. From designated school official
  • Meet entrance requirements set by postsecondary institution. Student must meet course entrance requirements/course prerequisites.
  • Student in grades 11-12
  • Other. Parental permission
Cap on number of credits students may earn Not set in state policy
Students/parents must be notified of dual enrollment opportunities No
Counseling/advising is made available to students Yes. Each high school/college partnership must have a contact person for overseeing the program in both the high school and college. The liaision is responsible for coordinating advisement, course schedules, regular and standardized communications, course transferability, and support services. Each partnership must also coordinate support services that include, but are not limited to, tutoring, technical assistance, library resources, counseling, advising and peer support. Each student and his/her parent must sign the Community College‐High School Dual/Concurrent Registration Form and discuss student responsibility and transfer of credits.
Finance
Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Student's district. A postsecondary institution may not assess any fee from the participating student for textbooks, materials, student services or any other fees otherwise assessed and collected from students attending the institution.
How state funds participating high schools Equal
How state funds participating postsecondary institutions Equal
Ensuring Program Quality
Instructor and course quality component Yes. Responsibility for the quality of dual and concurrent enrollment courses lies with the postsecondary institution. A concurrent enrollment course (taught by high school instructor appointed adjunct faculty by a community college) must be approved by the community college as having equivalent course content, learning objectives and work assignments as an existing college course, as determined by community college faculty. The Manual of Procedures for Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Courses specifies: "College faculty members and high school teachers shall engage in yearly discussions to assure use of equivalent syllabi, assignments, and end‐of‐course assessments as those used in courses taught on campus. College faculty members and high school teachers must
address common expectations and review student work on a regular basis. Courses shall be reviewed annually to assure quality."

Through the Wyoming Adjunct Professor Loan Repayment Program (WAPLR), the Wyoming Community College Commission makes funds available to high school teachers who require additional coursework to qualify as adjunct instructors under the concurrent enrollment policies of a community college district or the University of Wyoming. A loan recipient may repay the loan without cash payment by teaching at least one concurrent enrollment course for a minimum of two years, beginning the fall following completion of the courses necessary to qualify the individual to teach a concurrent enrollment course. The school district must annually verify the applicant is teaching a concurrent college level credit-bearing course.
Program reporting requirement Yes. A district (or board of cooperative educational services) and a postsecondary institution must annually file a report with the community college commission on student participation and completion and on revenues and expenditures for program activities for the immediately preceding school year. The commission must then annually report to the joint education interim committee, the community colleges, the department of education and the University of Wyoming on statewide program revenues, expenditures and student participation and completion.
Program evaluation component Yes. 2010 legislation provides that a major component of state policy development from consensus discussions led by the community college commission must include the establishment and maintenance of a data system compiling student enrollment, completion and outcome information for dual and concurrent enrollment programs. Efforts must be coordinated with the transcript center within the department of education, and the longitudinal data collection effort under the Hathaway student scholarship program. The Manual of Procedures for Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Programs clarifies that these data on "success in subsequent academic coursework, persistence of post‐secondary programs toward certificate and/or degree completion" are "to assist schools and colleges in assessment of student course outcomes".
Transferability
Public postsecondary institutions required to accept credits Yes

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