P-16/P-20 Councils - All State Profiles
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P-16/P-20 Councils - All State Profiles

P-16 councils were first established in the 1990s to convene state leaders representing early learning (the "P") through the first four years of college (the "16"). More recently, states have extended the intended scope of such councils' work to P-20, to reach doctoral and professional schools (the "20"). The stated goal of P-16 and P-20 councils is to develop a seamless system of education with aligned expectations from the earliest years of a child's development, through the K-12 system, and into and through postsecondary education. This database provides the following information:

1. Name of council: Currently, 38 states have established a P-16 or P-20 council. Two states (Louisiana and Pennsylvania) have two councils convening P-16/P-20 stakeholders, for a total of 40 P-16 or P-20 councils nationwide. An additional five states do not have a P-16 or P-20 council, but have consolidated most or all governance of public education in one or two agencies or boards who essentially perform the function of a P-16 or P-20 council. The names of these governing agencies or boards are designated with an asterisk (*).

Why does it matter?

A focused agenda can reduce the likelihood that time and effort will be spent on duplicative efforts.

Alabama
P-16 Councils
Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time.

Alaska
P-16 Councils
Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time.

Arizona
P-16 Councils
Name of council The Governor's P-20 Council
Coordinating body Office of the governor
Membership

All members are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor. As of May 2008, the council includes 36 voting members. As established in the executive order, membership, at a minimum, must include the following:

Early Learning (Min. 3):
Arizona Early Childhood Development and Health Board (one member)
At least two representatives of the early childhood education community

K-12 Education (Min. 8):
Superintendent of Public Instruction or his designee
At least two career and technical education representatives
At least four K-12 representatives (representing a charter school, middle/junior high school, high school, and classroom teacher)
State board of education (one member)
A representative actively engaged in high school dropout prevention programs or policy
A student representing a high school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
At least three locally elected officials, one of which must be a school board member (also listed under "Government" below)

Postsecondary (Min. 9):
Arizona Board of Regents (one member)
Presidents of the three state universities
No more than four community college representatives (with at least two representing rural community colleges)
A representative of a four-year private postsecondary institution
Student representative of a high school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "K-12" above)

Government (Min. 3):Governor
At least three locally elected officials, one of which must be a school board member (also listed under "K-12" above)

Business (Min. 8):The public, including but not limited to representatives of parent groups, business, industry and philanthropic organizations (at least eight members) (also listed under "Other" below)
Governor's Council on Workforce Policy (one representative)
Arizona Economic Resources Organization (AERO) (one representative)

Other (Min. 1):The public, including but not limited to representatives of parent groups, business, industry and philanthropic organizations (at least eight members) (also listed under "Business" above)
A tribal representative

Ex officio members (Max. 4): Legislature (Not more than four members)

Year started 2005
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding State funds support staff positions. Private and Tribal grants support the council’s initiatives.
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–two full-time FTEs support the council, as do two policy advisors who together provide a third FTE. Various support staff also assist the council.
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing

In December 2006, the P-20 council issued its first set of 32 recommendations to the governor. Since that time, the council has been working aggressively to implement each of those recommendations.

The council’s work is based on five strategic goals that serve as its foundation. These goals include ensuring that:

  • Every child is safe, healthy and ready to succeed
  • Every 3rd grader is able to read at grade level
  • Every 8th grader is prepared to take and pass algebra
  • Every graduating high school student is prepared for work and postsecondary education in the 21st century
  • Arizona’s education system creates a strong pipeline of students who are prepared to build and sustain a knowledge-based economy.

Additionally, the council is focusing its work in seven policy areas, which also serve as the council’s committee structure, and include the following initiatives for 2008:

Education Alignment & Assessment Committee

  • Review assessments, including AIMS and end of course tests.
  • More students taking and passing Algebra I in the 8th grade.
  • Adoption of the more rigorous math standard.
  • Revision of Arizona’s English Language Arts standard.
  • Commissioned the report, “From Education to Work: Is Arizona Prepared? Alignment Project Report,” in 2006 which provided the baseline data for many of the P-20 Council’s recommendations.
  • Facilitated discussions and meetings with and between the Arizona Board of Regents and the State Board of Education to address the issues of alignment of K-12 curriculum, assessments, and graduation requirements that will prepare students for post secondary education and the workforce.

Education and Workforce Pathways Committee

  • Create multiple pathways for students to meet high school graduation requirements.
  • Expand early college options.
  • Enhance the academic content within CTE programs of study.
  • Partnered in hosting the state’s first Summit on 21st Century Skills in October 2007.

Teachers Committee

  • Improve teacher quality.
  • Increase the attraction, retention and supply of STEM teachers.
  • Arizona STEM Center.
  • Completed the report, “Strengthening Teacher Quality and Support: Next Steps for Arizona,” and integrated the recommendations into the work of the P-20 Council (2007).

Data and Graduation Committee

  • Raise the compulsory attendance age.
  • Implement an effective data system.
  • Implement a teacher identifier.

Communications Committee

  • Conduct a public awareness campaign in partnership with education, foundation and business leaders.

Literacy Committee

  • Support teachers by providing strategies to support literacy instruction.
  • Implement a teacher scholarship to increase the number of Arizona teachers with a Reading Endorsement.
  • Conducted three adolescent literacy forums in 2007.

Early Education Ad Hoc Committee

  • Assist in planning and participate in a day-long meeting on aligning early childhood with the early elementary years.
  • Identify recommendations regarding priorities and strategies around early childhood and elementary alignment (P-3) to be incorporated into the work of the Council’s standing committees.
  • Identify recommendations regarding priorities and strategies on aligning early childhood development into the entire P-20 education continuum, to be incorporated into the work of the Council’s standing committees.

Higher Education Ad Hoc Committee

  • Implement Centennial Scholars program.
  • Increase bachelor’s degree production.
  • Facilitate more students going to and graduating from a community college/university
  • Expand collaborative programs (such as 2+2, 3+1, and 2+2+2 agreements).
  • Develop strategies to provide expanded degree programs at community colleges in limited subject areas.
  • Explore the creation of "university centers" on community college campuses.
  • Enhance the transfer of credits between institutions that count toward a degree.
  • Streamline governance of higher education.
  • Commissioned “A Feasibility and Demand Study for the State of Arizona,” to determine gaps in access to degrees in all parts of the state. This work has resulted in a number of collaborative planning efforts including the work of the Arizona Board of Regents, the Arizona Legislature and the P-20 Council itself.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
Notes/Citation: The Council has adopted specific goals such as increasing the state's graduation rate by 12% by 2012, and is working to double the number of bachelor's degrees produced by 2020. In addition, staff utilize a strategic plan to track the Council's progress. The council also tracks the progress of its initiatives by setting baselines and using data to track relevant measures each year.
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body

Governor and the P-20 Council have been the impetus for planning and implementing significant policy changes in the state’s education system and continue this work today. A number of accomplishments, to date, are listed below:

Education Alignment & Assessment:

  • Recommended that the Arizona State Board of Education (SBE) increase high school graduation requirements from two years of mathematics to four, and two years of science to three. The recommendation included increasing the level of mathematics rigor to a level better aligned with college and work readiness. In response, the SBE not only increased the required number of mathematics credits, but also the level of mathematics rigor. Previously, Arizona high school students were required to reach the level of Geometry; under the new requirements, all Arizona high school students will be required to reach the level of Algebra II. The P-20 Council worked with the SBE to bring this recommendation into policy.
  • Provided specific recommendations for the increased rigor of the mathematics standard, which included developing language for 11th-12th grades and a bridge to college level work. This language was entirely new. The P-20 Council is working now to bring recommendations to align Arizona’s English Language Arts standard.
  • Is working to implement the Algebra II End of Course assessment by May 2008.

Teachers

  • As a result of the recommendations made in the Teachers Subcommittee's 2007 report, “Strengthening Teacher Quality and Support: Next Steps for Arizona, Governor Napolitano included teacher pay raises – $100 million and $46 million, respectively – in her 2006 and 2007 budgets.
  • Governor Napolitano’s FY 2008 budget included $4.75 million in grants for STEM teachers and related activities. The State Board of Education received $2.5 million to promote improved pupil achievement in math or science by providing supplemental funding for innovative programs. The Arizona Board of Regents received $2.25 million for scholarships to attract, graduate and retain more teachers in math, science and special education disciplines.
  • The Governor will build and fund a new, centrally located STEM Center that will improve and align STEM education in Arizona to ensure that all Arizona students are prepared to meet the demands of the 21st century. The STEM Center will provide the innovative programs, research, training, and communications that will assist the State in its current STEM education and teaching reform efforts.

Education and Workforce Pathways

  • Recommended that the Arizona Department of Education and the State Board of Education (SBE) implement personalized graduation plans. SBE adopted Education and Career Action Plans (ECAP) language into rule in February 2008. An ECAP will be required beginning with the entering freshmen of 2009.
  • Working to enhance the academic content within Career and Technical Education programs of study, in partnership with the Arizona Department of Education. It is expected that the CTE and mathematics standards will be cross-walked in spring 2008.

Literacy

  • Providing scholarships to teachers ranging from $1,500 to $2,000 for teachers to attain the state Reading Endorsement.
  • Created and distributed literacy toolkits for Arizona 4th, 5th and 6th grade teachers through the support of a National Governors Association Grant (2008).
  • Hosted three regional Adolescent Literacy Forums through the support of a National Governors Association Grant (2007).
  • Worked with the Alliance for Excellence in Education in the preparation and presentation of the report, “Improving Adolescent Literacy in Arizona,” (2005) which is the baseline for the work being done by the Literacy Committee.

Higher Education

  • The legislature created an early college scholarship program that provides grants for students graduating early to attend a postsecondary institution (2007).
  • Tripled state’s contribution to student financial aid and developed a scholarship program for private postsecondary students.

Communications

  • Will launch a public awareness campaign in spring 2008. This effort includes major foundations, agencies and interests in a coordinated campaign to raise awareness of the importance of increased educational alignment and attainment to make Arizona more globally competitive.

P-20 Council Related Legislation:
S.B. 1512 (signed by governor into law, 2006) provides $2.5 million additional funding for the Arizona Department of Education to continue development of Arizona’s data system.

S.B. 1045 (signed by governor into law, 2006) requires integration of K-12 student identifier numbers at public universities and community colleges.

H.B. 2206 (bill stalled but included in final budget, 2007) a $2.25 million teacher student loan program was created to encourage more teachers to enter into the mathematics, science and special education teaching fields.

S.B. 1069 (signed by Governor into Law, 2007) established the early graduation scholarship program, which is designed to provide an incentive (financial aid of up to $2,000) for students to graduate early from high school and promptly move into a postsecondary education experience.

State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-20 council: Executive Order 2008-14 (amends and supercedes 2005 Executive Orders 2005-26 and 2005-19); Debra Raeder, Executive Director, Governor's P-20 Council
P-20 council Web site: http://www.governor.state.az.us/P20/

Arkansas
P-16 Councils
Name of council Arkansas Commission for Coordination of Educational Efforts
Coordinating body Leadership of the council rotates between the higher education coordinating office and the department of education.
Membership As established in statute, the 19 members of the commission include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 19):

Early Learning (1):
Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education, Department of Human Services (director or designee)

K-12 Education (6):
Commissioner of Education
Public school administrator
Public school teacher
Arkansas Education Association (member)
Arkansas Association of Educational Administrators (member)
Arkansas School Boards Association (member)

Postsecondary (7):
Director of the Department of Higher Education
President or chancellor of a four-year university
President or chancellor of a two-year college or two-year branch of a four-year university
Member of the board of trustees of a four-year university or system of colleges and universities
Member of the board of trustees of a two-year college or branch
Vice President for Agriculture, University of Arkansas System (also listed under "business" below)
Representative of a predominantly black college or university

Government (1):
Governor or designee
Note: While no legislators serve on the commission, the members representing the Arkansas Education Association, the Arkansas Association of Educational Administrators the Arkansas School Boards Association and a predominantly black college or university must be appointed by legislative leadership from a slate of candidates.

Business (3):
Department of Workforce Education (director)
Arkansas Economic Development Commission (director)
Vice President for Agriculture, University of Arkansas System (also listed under "postsecondary" above)

Other (2): Arkansas Science and Technology Authority (president)
Arkansas Department of Information Systems (director or designee)
Year started 2003 (although some voluntary efforts in place before 2003)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding Commission receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The council is required by statute to provide an annual report to the governor, senate and house education committees, the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and all boards of trustees of public institutions of higher education.

Secondary Reading:

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM):
The commission's 2007 annual report includes the recommendation, in response to 2007 Act 1024 and Act 564: "There must be better qualified teachers and more available resources for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subject areas."

High School Graduation Requirements: In 2007, the commission discussed the possibility of eliminating the opt-out provision for the Smart Core Curriculum, the rigorous graduation requirements that become the default high school curriculum effective with the Class of 2010.

College Readiness: The commission provided the state board of education with recommendations to improve alignment of K-12 and postsecondary math and literacy course standards. These standards were also reviewed by Achieve, Inc. and representatives of postsecondary and K-12 education. The commission is also discussing using the Algebra II end-of-course assessment as a college placement exam.

Dual Enrollment: The commission's 2007 annual report includes the group's recommendation that "More effort needs to be made by the colleges and universities to validate and assure the standards are being met for concurrent enrollment courses, including the credentials of the instructors. This must be specified in writing more precisely than it has been done in the past."

Teacher Shortage/Retention and Teacher Quality: The commission's subcommittee on teacher shortage/retention issued numerous findings and recommendations aimed at increasing the number and retention of K-12 educators serving the state.

The commission's 2007 annual report also provides recommendations on improving teacher quality and the perception of the teaching profession.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The commission is chaired by a member of the Arkansas State University board of trustees.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The state board approved policies to better align K-12 literacy and mathematics standards with postsecondary entrance expectations based on recommendations provided by the Commission for Coordination of Educational Efforts.

The commission's 2007 annual report sets forth recommendations for legislative and rulemaking activity to ensure the quality of dual enrollment courses, including instructor credentials; improve the qualifications of teachers in and increase resources for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subject areas; improve teacher recruitment and retention; and on other areas, including experiential learning, teacher quality and licensure, and length of the school year.
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-16 council: ARK. CODE ANN. § 6-1-301 through -304; Dr. Ken James, Commissioner of Education
P-16 council Web site: No Web site as of March 2008

California
P-16 Councils
Name of council Superintendent's California P-16 Council
Coordinating body State department of education
Membership As of January 24, 2008, the 52 members include the following:

Early Learning:
Preschool California (president)
Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California, Berkeley (director)

K-12 Education:
California State Board of Education (former board member)
California State Parent Teacher Association (president-elect)
California School Boards Association (executive director)
California School Employees Association (member, board of directors)
California Teachers Association (legislative advocate)
California Charter Schools Association (senior vice president)
California Alliance of African American Educators (president)
Claremont Unified School District (director, secondary education)
Garden Grove Unified School District (board member)
Los Angeles Unified School District, Local District 4 (superintendent)
Oak Grove School District, San Jose (superintendent)
Oak Middle School, Los Alamitos Unified School District (teacher)
Montebello Unified School District (teacher)
California GEAR UP (director)
Sacramento County Office of Education (assistant superintendent)
San Bernardino City Unified School District (administrator of program improvement)
San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools (superintendent)
San Francisco Unified School District (superintendent)
San Francisco Education Fund (member, board of directors)
San Mateo Union High School District (teacher)
Alpaugh Unified School District, Tulare County (superintendent)
W.C. Carlé Continuation High School, Konocti Unified School District (teacher of the year)

Postsecondary:Butte College (teacher)
California Community Colleges (vice chancellor, academic affairs)
California State University, Office of the Chancellor (assistant vice chancellor)
California State University, Bakersfield (president)
California State University, Fresno (student)
California State University, Los Angeles (trustee professor)
Sacramento City College (dean, learning resources division)
San Diego State University (professor, assistant to the president)
University of California, Office of the President (provost and executive vice president)
University of California (regent)
University of California, Davis (dean, school of education)

Government:
California State Assembly (speaker)
California State Senate (majority leader)

Business:
Apple, Inc. (strategic relations manager)
California Manufacturers and Technology Association (president)
IBM Global Education Industry (vice president)
Silicon Valley Leadership Group (president and CEO)
Washington Mutual (vice president, corporate and employee giving)

Other:ARCHES (executive director)
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (senior policy officer for education)
Cambridge Education (senior vice president)
Compton Adult School (director)
Education Trust-West (superintendent in residence)
James Irvine Foundation (director of youth programs)
Springboard Schools (educational coach/consultant)
Project Lead the Way, Inc. (director, state and corporate relations)
Great Schools, Inc. (president and CEO)
Silver Giving Foundation (president)
Year started 2004
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16

Made permanent by executive order or statute No-informally established

Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the state department of education budget and by support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–a unit at the California Department of Education supports the work of the council.
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Closing the Achievement Gap: The council's work is focused on closing the achievement gap, defined as the gaps between ethnic groups, between native English speakers and English language learners, between non-economically disadvantaged students and their economically disadvantaged counterparts, and between students without disabilities and students with disabilities.

The council has formed subcommittees focused on four themes (language below borrowed from January 2008 council report):

(1) Access, or the extent to which all students have equitable access to basic conditions, such as qualified, effective teachers; rigorous, curriculum based on the state academic content standards; "safety nets" and accelerated interventions.
(2) Culture and Climate, or the extent to which the learning environment is safe, promotes a sense of belonging, and fosters strong, positive relationships among students, among school staff and between the school and home/community.
(3) Expectations, or the extent to which a culture of excellence exists for students and adults alike, so that a common, high standard is the norm for all students, and getting all of them to meet those high standards is a responsibility embraced by the school community.
(4) Strategies, or the extent to which evidence-based or promising teaching, leadership, and organizational practices are employed by practitioners at all levels in areas such as delivery of standards-aligned instructional programs, standards of professional practice, needs-based allocation of resources, collegial accountability and collaboration, articulation across grade spans, and leadership development.

High School: The first issue the council addressed, high school reform, was the subject of a February 2007 report providing the council's recommendations for state policy changes.

Professional Development: The council issued a September 2007 report providing essential questions, research and recommendations on teacher, support staff and administrator professional development.

The council has also developed a three-year (2007-2009) plan of activities to address the achievement gap.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by a trustee professor from California State University, Los Angeles.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body No policy changes have been enacted to date. However, legislation introduced in 2008 reflects recommendations issued by the P-16 council. All language below reflects bill text as of March 19, 2008

A.B. 2759 expresses legislative intent to consolidate and streamline education programs serving children ages 3-5.

S.B. 1629 expresses legislative intent to establish a commission to create an early learning quality improvement system.

A.B. 100 expresses legislative intent to enact a Kindergarten-University Public Education Facilities Bond Act of 2008, to become operative only if approved by the voters at the November 2008 statewide general election.

A.B. 2391 allows elementary and secondary teachers in districts receiving incentive funding through the Mathematics and Reading Professional Development Program to fulfill up to 40 of the 80 hours of required professional development in such areas as data analysis, alignment of assessment and instruction, implication of data analysis and its effect on increasing pupil achievement, impact on pupil success through diagnostic teaching, differentiating instruction through pacing and complexity, grouping as an aid to instruction, and statewide and local data management systems.

In addition, state efforts outside legislation will augment California's data system (CALPADS), to create a statewide student unit records database linking early learning records through K-12 through postsecondary. The enhanced data system will also house teacher assignment data allow teachers access to information to develop interventions for individual students. Recommendations issued by the P-16 council have informed development of this aligned data system.
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-16 council: Jose Ortega, Administrator, P-16 Policy Development, California Department of Education
P-16 council Web site: http://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/pc/

Colorado
P-16 Councils
Name of council The Governor's P-20 Education Coordinating Council
Coordinating body Office of the governor
Membership All members are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor (executive order does not specify minimum or maximum number of members, or role groups from which members must be selected). As of April 2008, the 31 voting members include the following:

Early Learning:
Mile High Montessori (executive director)

K-12 Education:
Kit Carson School District (superintendent)
Mesa Valley County 51 School District (superintendent)
Martin Luther King, Jr. Early College (principal)
Cherry Creek School District (superintendent)
Littleton Public Schools (assistant superintendent)
Denver Public Schools (board member)
Boulder Valley Schools (teacher)
Colorado Education Association (past president)
Adams 12 School District (counselor)
Colorado Department of Education (director, English Language Acquisition Unit)
The Classical Academy (president)
Colorado Assocation for Career and Technical Education (executive director)
North Conejos School District (board president)
Colorado Statewide Parent Coalition (executive director)

Postsecondary:
Colorado State University at Pueblo (president)
Metropolitan State College Board of Trustees (chair of board of trustees)
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center (associate vice chancellor of student services)
Western State College (provost)
Community College of Aurora (president)
Platt College (president)
Fort Lewis College (professor - geology)
University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (professor - mathematics)
Colorado State University (assistant vice president, Student Success)
University of Denver (former chancellor)
University of Colorado at Boulder (dean)
University of Northern Colorado (dean)

Government:
Lieutenant govenor

Business:
A business representative will be appointed

Other:
Bonfils-Stanton Foundation (president)
Colorado Uplift (executive director)

Ex officio members:
Colorado Department of Education (commissioner)
Colorado State Board of Education (chair)
Colorado Commission on Higher Education (chair)
Colorado Department of Higher Education (executive director)

In addition, the council has five subcommittees, comprised of both voting members of the council as well as participants who have voting privileges on their respective subcommittees but not on the council as a whole. Subcommittee members who are not full P-20 council members include legislators, state board members and "invited advisors" representing various role groups, such as K-12 education, higher education, the foundation community and various local and state-level youth and education advocacy organizations around the state.
Year started 2007 (prior Colorado Education Alignment Council created by executive order in 2005 and dissolved in October 2006 by former governor Bill Owens)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the Daniels Fund, the Donnell-Kay Foundation, the Rose Community Foundation, the El Pomar Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) grant from Intel Corporation all help support the work of the council.
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–a full-time FTE in the governor's office supports the council. The governor's education policy advisor also devotes a portion of his time to staffing the council, as does a staffer for each of the five subcommittees, who work for the the governor's office, the lieutenant governor's office, the University of Colorado at Denver, College in Colorado, and the Colorado Children's Campaign.
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The council has created subcommittees on P-3; data and accountability; dropout prevention and recovery; educator recruitment, preparation and retention; and preparation and transitions [to postsecondary]. The council released recommendations in each of these areas in November 2007.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Two members–the lieutenant governor and the president of Colorado State University at Pueblo–co-chair the council.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body Recommendations issued by the council in 2007 have been written into the 2008 legislation below.

H.B. 1364: Establishes the Data Protocol Development Council to design and implement a protocol for the collection, storage and sharing of unit records among various state agencies. Also provides for the assignment of a unique student identifier to children enrolled in state- or federally-subsidized early childhood education services. (Signed into law May 14, 2008.)

H.B. 1370: Establishes the School Counselor Corps Grant Program to provide districts with grants to improve access to quality counseling in high schools, with the goal of increasing the number of students who
complete high school and who are prepared for, apply to and enter postsecondary education. Provides grant funds may be used to hire additional counselors, provide professional development to counselors and other staff, and offer other services to improve high school counseling. (Signed into law May 27, 2008.)

H.B. 1388: Amends the Public School Finance Act of 1994 to make various provisions, including increased funding for the Colorado Preschool Program and increased funding of full-day kindergarten, as recommended by the P-20 council's P-3 committee. (Signed into law May 22, 2008.)

S.B. 65
: Establishes the "Alternative Teacher Compensation Plan Act." Establishes a competitive grant program to provide funding to districts to support development and implementation of a district-designed alternative teacher compensation plan. (Postponed in house appropriations committee.)

S.B. 212: Establishes the "Preschool to Postsecondary Education Alignment Act." Makes numerous provisions related to school readiness and P-12 alignment of curricula, standards and assessments to ensure students' postsecondary and workforce readiness by the end of grade 12, and review of postsecondary admissions standards and placement tests to ensure alignment with the state postsecondary and workforce readiness definition. Provides for admission and placement of students demonstrating postsecondary readiness in credit-bearing courses in public postsecondary institutions.

Requires the chief state school officer and state higher education executive officer to convene regional P-20 meetings at least annually with specified early learning, K-12 and postsecondary stakeholders to help implement school readiness and alignment of curricula, standards and assessments to ensure students' postsecondary and workforce readiness. (Signed into law May 14, 2008.)

State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-16 council: Executive order 003 007; Janet Lopez, Deputy Director, Governor's P-20 Council
P-16 council Web site: http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite?c=Page&childpagename=GovRitter%2FGOVRLayout&cid=1187772339688&p=1187772339688&pagename=GOVRWrapper

Connecticut
P-16 Councils
Name of council Connecticut's PK-20 Council
Coordinating body Interim management team (as of April 2008 is handling details with Achieve)
Membership In the process of being expanded
Year started 2008 (although some efforts started in 2006)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
Advisory only or has authority To be determined
Source of council's funding To be determined
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing To be determined
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor To be determined
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None as of April 2008
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils To be determined
Sources PK-20 council: Barbara Westwater, Chief, Bureau of Curriculum and Instruction, Connecticut State Department of Education
PK-20 council Web site: http://www.ctdhe.org/P20/default.htm

Delaware
P-16 Councils
Name of council Delaware P-20 Council
Coordinating body State department of education
Membership As established in statute, the 12 members include the following:

Early Learning:
Delaware Early Care and Education Council (chair)

K-12 Education:
Secretary of Public Education ( = Delaware chief state school officer)
State Board of Education (president)

Postsecondary:
Delaware State University (president)
Delaware Technical and Community College (president)
University if Delaware (president)
Wesley College (president)

Government:
Governor
House Education Committee (chair)
Senate Education Committee (chair)

Business:
Business Roundtable Education Committee (chair)
Delaware State Chamber of Commerce (president)
Year started 2003
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order

Notes/Citation: While the council was initially created by executive order in 2003, 2005 legislation established the council in statute.

Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the state department of education and state board of education budgets.
Council meets at least once a quarter Not quarterly, but at least three times a year (subcommittees meet more frequently).
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–a state board policy analyst supports the council. Department of education staff also provide support as necessary.
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Early Learning: The Professional Development for Early Care and Education subcommittee was created in December 2007.

P-16 Data System: The Higher Education Data Cube subcommittee "was created to facilitate the creation of a data cube to link information between high schools, the Department of Education and institutions of higher education to be accessed by key people in schools, districts and colleges. These data will help personnel at all levels to identify areas that need improvement to insure student success from high school to college" (P-20 council Web site).  

Closing the Achievement Gap: One of the primary objectives of the Achievement Gap Action Group (AGAG) was to adopt a measure to "minimize the fluctuations in the gap that resulted when looking at different groups of students each year" (P-20 council Web site). To that end, the committee "has issued 5 annual 'Awareness to Action' reports on tracking the achievement gap in Delaware schools. In addition, with funding from the State Board of Education, AGAG sponsored and worked with the Research and Development Center on the Correlates of Achievement data base for all middle and high schools" (minutes of December 3, 2007 group meeting).

AGAG held its last meeting in December 2007; the new Delaware College Access Network subcommittee (DE-CAN - see more information below) subcommittee was established in January 2008 with some of the AGAG members, as well as members from the Rodel Foundation and higher education representatives.

High School Graduation Requirements: The committee, formed in September 2005 after a commissioned Achieve report suggested the state should increase its graduation expectations in English language arts and math, and make other requirements more specific. The committee issued recommendations that were presented to the state board of education in summer 2006. The regulations approved by the board that summer reflect the recommendations provided by the subcommittee. A 2006 report, "Updating Delaware's High School Graduation Requirements," details the recommendations and next steps for the state.

College Access and Success: The Delaware College Access Network (DE-CAN) subcommittee was created in January 2008. As stated in the minutes of the subcommittee's January 25, 2008 meeting, "The primary mission of DE-CAN is to strengthen the preparation of public school students in Delaware to ensure their college readiness and ability to succeed in work readiness programs, as well as degree attainment from two- and four-year college degree programs." The minutes state the following five objectives for the group:

1. Develop and strengthen public support for increasing academic rigor
2. Support student access to a state-wide network of college preparatory activities.
3. Develop a community-wide academic support infrastructure.
4. Use data to measure student access and success in higher education.
5. Develop a financial plan to support DE-CAN.

Dual Enrollment: The dual enrollment subcommittee was established to set a statewide dual enrollment policy, as part of the work to be conducted under the National Governors Association Honor State grant to Delaware. The subcommittee's work in 2006-2007 resulted in the issuing of an October 2007 report that set forth the subcommittee's recommendations on a number of policy issues related to dual enrollment/dual credit. 

State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Notes/Citation: State has not set P-16 performance goals per se, but has set goals of the P-16 council, available at http://www.doe.state.de.us/info/P20council/goals.shtml
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is co-chaired by the president of the state board of education and the secretary of education.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The revised high school graduation requirements approved by the state board of education in August 2006 were a direct result of recommendations proposed by the graduation requirements subcommmittee.

K-12 student databases can now connect to higher education databases, thanks to the work of the data subcommittee.

The dual credit committee's work is ongoing, but change has not yet taken place. Higher education officials are now working together to establish a common matrix of courses that are offered and that are recognized for postsecondary credit (i.e., English 101 taken at Institution A is recognized for English credit at Institution B).

State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-20 council: Gov. Ruth Ann Minner Executive Order #47; DEL. CODE ANN. tit. 14, § 107; Valerie Woodruff, Secretary of Public Education
P-20 council Web site: http://www.doe.state.de.us/info/P20council/default.shtml

District of Columbia
P-16 Councils

Florida
P-16 Councils
Name of council State Board of Education and Board of Governors of the State University System*

Constitutional amendments approved by voters in 1998 authorized the reorganization of Florida's education system. These changes were codified in 2000 as the Florida Education Governance Reorganization Act of 2000. The act requires the governor to appoint a seven-member state board of education with authority for education from Prekindergarten through graduate school education, as well as authority to appoint the commissioner of education. Effective January 7, 2003, the act additionally eliminated numerous commissions and boards (including the Board of Regents) and reassigned their authority to the Florida Board of Education. The 2002 rewrite of the education code created the K-20 Education Code. However, a successful 2002 constitutional amendment created the Board of Governors to oversee the state university system; these changes were codified in 2003 and subsequent legislation. The roles of the Board of Governors and its staff continue to be sorted out in legislative and Board actions.
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
Sources P-16: FLA. STAT. ch. 1000.01-1000.4, 1007.01, 20.115; Jay Pfeiffer, Deputy Commissioner of Accountability, Research and Measurement, Florida Department of Education

Georgia
P-16 Councils
Name of council Alliance of Education Agency Heads
Coordinating body Office of the governor (Office of Student Achievement)
Membership The 7 members of the alliance include:

Early Learning (1):
Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning (commissioner)

K-12 Education (2):
State Superintendent of Schools
Georgia Professional Standards Commission (executive director)

Postsecondary (3):
Chancellor of the University System of Georgia
Department of Technical and Adult Education (commissioner)
Georgia Student Finance Commission (president) and GA College 411

Government (1):
Governor's Office of Student Achievement (executive director)
Year started 2006 (although 1996 saw then-governor Zell Miller's creation of state's–and nation's–first P-16 council, the Georgia P-16 Council, which became the Education Coordinating Council in 2000-2002)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding As of May 2008, funding is included in the budgets of the participating agencies.
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–plans are underway to hire a full time staff person to support the Alliance.
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing

The Alliance has set five goals:

1. Increase high school graduation rate, decrease high school drop-out rate, and increase postsecondary enrollment rate.

2. Strengthen teacher quality, recruitment, and retention.

3. Improve workforce readiness skills.

4. Develop strong education leaders, particularly at the building level.

5. Improve the SAT/ACT scores of Georgia students.

State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
Notes/Citation: A workplan has been completed for Goal I ("increase high school graduation rate, decrease high school drop-out rate, and increase post-secondary enrollment rate"). A workplan for Goal II ("strengthen teacher quality, recruitment, and retention") is under development, as of May 2008.
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the state superintendent of education.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-16 council: Candace C. Sommer, Community Relations Manager, Department of P-16, Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia; Dana Tofig, Director, Communications, Georgia Department of Education
P-16 council Web site: http://www.gaeducationalliance.org/, http://www.usg.edu/p16/

Hawaii
P-16 Councils
Name of council United for Learning: The Hawaii P-20 Initiative
Coordinating body Leadership team (comprised of the Good Beginnings Alliance Executive Director, the superintendent of the Hawai'i Department of Education, and the University of Hawai'i President)
Membership As of February 2008, the council includes 30 members, who are the head or designee of the following organizations:

Early Learning:
Good Beginnings Alliance
Hawai'i Association for the Education of Young Children
Kamehameha Schools (also represents K-12 education and "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

K-12 Education:Hawai'i State Department of Education (HIDOE)
Hawai'i Association of Independent Schools (also represents postsecondary and Catholic schools)
Hawai'i Board of Education
Hawai'i Government Employees Association (bargaining agent for K-12 principals)
Hawai'i Parent, Teachers, Students Association
Hawai'i State Teachers Association
Hawai'i Teachers Standards Board
Joint Venture Education Forum
Kamehameha Schools (also represents early learning and "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

Postsecondary:University of Hawai'i (UH), including

    • UH Board of Regents
    • UH College of Education
    • UH Professional Assembly (labor union for UH faculty)
    • UH System Academic Affairs (planning and policy office for 10-campus system)

Hawai'i Association of Independent Schools (also represents Catholic schools)

Government:Governor's Office (policy analyst attends on the governor's behalf)
State House of Representatives (Chairs of K-12 and higher education committees)
State Senate Education Committees (Chairs of K-12 and higher education committees)
U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye's Office (Chief of staff attends on behalf of the state's senior U.S. senator)

Business:Chamber of Commerce of Hawai'i
Hawai'i Business Roundtable
Pacific Resource Partnership (Nonprofit trust fund created in 1987 "to promote the benefits of union carpentry from unionized contractors") (language from 2005 P-20 strategic plan)

Other:Hawaii Alliance for Arts Education
Kamehameha Schools (represents "other" interests by virtue of community outreach services).

Other council members can be recommended to the leadership team via the executive director.

Year started 2002
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the budgets of the University of Hawaii System and state department of education, as well as federal and private foundation grants.
Council meets at least once a quarter No. Meetings were formerly quarterly, but are now held on a semi-annual basis.
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing

P-3 Initiative: "Capturing the Momentum," supported by a $10 million, eight-year grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, "will support the development of high quality, culturally sensitive learning environments in early childhood through grade 3 settings and classrooms," with the goal that all third graders will read on grade level. The project will replicate and provide support for successful community-based and state-level initiatives already in place. A fact sheet provides additional information on the effort.

Longitudinal Data: The council has completed a contract with Cal-PASS to conduct preliminary analysis of longitudinal data in the state. If the pilot proves successful, the council will continue to develop "HI-PASS" for Hawaii–creating unique student identifiers to make possible longitudinal tracking of cohorts from high school to postsecondary. Such a data system will allow the state to measure the impact of high school reforms on  students' postsecondary outcomes.

High School to Postsecondary Transitions: Multiple efforts, including:

  • American Diploma Project, which assists member states in developing and implementing rigorous high school curricula, college-ready standards and assessments, and accountability for high school and postsecondary success. As part of this effort, the council is supporting a proposal to increase the rigor of the state's more advanced "Recognition Diploma."
  • GEAR UP state grant to foster college readiness and access among low-income students, beginning in the middle grades. These efforts include hosting college awareness month in January and such other efforts as free tax preparation (to facilitate completion of the FAFSA), college planning workshops and financial aid nights.
  • Achieving the Dream, a multi-state initiative to support retention of traditionally underserved students in community colleges.

Postsecondary Entry/Completion: The council voted at its November 2007 meeting that the group's long-term measurable goal would be to increase the proportion of working adults in Hawaii with a 2- or 4-year degree to 55% by 2025. (If the status quo were maintained, a projected 43.7% working adult Hawaiians would meet this benchmark.) The council staff are developing plans to backwards map from the goal to set intermediate benchmarks (such as high school graduation rate, college participation and completion rates, rate of adults returning to education, etc.) and communicate about the goal.

State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
Notes/Citation: At the November 2007 meeting, council members voted that the P-20 council's long-term goal would be to increase the proportion of working adults in the state with 2- or 4-year degrees to 55%.
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Meetings are chaired by an individual chosen from the Leadership Team (comprised of the president of the University of Hawai'i, the state superintendent of education and the executive director of the Good Beginnings Alliance).
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body No policy changes have been enacted to date. However, 2007 S.B. 688 directs the P-20 council to "develop and initiate plans for education in Hawaii in the twenty-first century" and appropriates funds toward this end for FY07-08 and FY08-09.

In addition, because of the state's participation in the American Diploma Project, the council may lobby the Hawaii Board of Education for policy changes.
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-20 council: United for Learning: The Hawai'i P-20 Initiative Strategic Plan: 2006-2010; Kathy Jaycox, P-20 Senior Associate, United for Learning: The Hawaii P-20 Initiative, Tammi Chun, Executive Director, United for Learning: The Hawaii P-20 Initiative
P-20 council Web site: http://p20hawaii.org/

Idaho
P-16 Councils
Name of council State Board of Education*

The Idaho State Board of Education oversees both K-12 and postsecondary education (K-20), fulfilling the function of a P-16 council.
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
Sources P-16: Idaho State Board of Education Web site http://www.boardofed.idaho.gov/ ; IDAHO CODE § 33-107; Mark Browning, Chief Communications Officer, Idaho State Board of Education

Illinois
P-16 Councils
Name of council Illinois P-20 Council
Coordinating body Office of the governor
Membership As established in statute, the 27 voting members include the following:

Early Learning, K-12 and Postsecondary (6):Six members representing pre-kindergarten through grade 20 teachers, community college and public university faculty.

K-12 Education (2): Two members representing local school administrators and school board members

Postsecondary (3): One member representing community colleges
One member representing four-year independent colleges and universities
One member representing public four-year universities

Government (6):
Govenor (or designee)
Four members of the General Assembly (one appointment each by speaker, house and senate minority leaders, senate president)
Representative of local government

Business (5):Five members appointed by statewide business organizations and business trade associations

Other (5):
Education research expert

Representative of:
Civic leaders
Trade unions
Nonprofit organizations or foundations
Parents' organizations


Ex officio members (individual or his/her designee) (9):
State Superintendent of Education
Executive Director of the Board of Higher Education
President and CEO of Illinois Community College Board
Executive Director of the Illinois Student Assistance Commission
Co-chairpersons of the Illinois Workforce Investment Board
Director of Commerce and Economic Opportunity
Chairperson of the Illinois Early Learning Council
President of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy
Year started 2008 (June 1, 2008 is effective date of 2007 legislation creating Illinois P-20 Council; voluntary efforts in place before 2008.)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding The council's work is funded through state appropriations and supported by the governor's office, in coordination with relevant state agencies, boards and commissions.
Council meets at least once a quarter Not determined as of March 2008
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Not determined as of March 2008
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Not determined as of March 2008
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. While statute states the governor or his designee will chair the council, it had not been determined as of March 2008 whether the governor or his designee would fill this role.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date (effective date of legislation creating P-20 council is July 1, 2008)
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-20 council: 105 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/22-45; Kristin Richards, Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of Governor Rod Blagojevich
P-20 council Web site: http://www2.illinois.gov/p20council/Pages/default.aspx

Indiana
P-16 Councils
Name of council Indiana's Education Roundtable
Coordinating body Office of the governor and state superintendent
Membership Statute does not specify a minimum or maximum number of members. Statute does specify appointments are to be made jointly by the Governor and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and requires a balance of membership between business/community and K-12/higher education. (As of May 2008, there are 13 members each representing K-12/postsecondary and business/community, but the state superintendent is considered a "government" rather than "K-12" representative, which may give the appearance of an imbalance to external database users.) Additional appointments from the General Assembly are made by legislative leadership and require representation of both political parties.

Membership has ranged from 23-34 members. Lists of members going back to the Roundtable’s inception can be found at www.edroundtable.state.in.us (scroll to the bottom of Members Web page for previous years).

As of April 2008, the 33 voting roundtable members include the following:

K-12 and Postsecondary (15): Superintendent of Public Instruction
Various members representing teachers, teacher unions, principals, superintendents, school business officials, local school boards, and public and independent universities

Government (5):

Governor
House Education Committee (chair and ranking minority member)
Senate Education Committee (chair and ranking minority member)

Business/Community (13): Various members representing private business and industry, state business/manufacturing associations, local foundation, local government (mayors and city councils), the Catholic community, and youth-serving organizations.

Ex officio members:Two members of the Indiana State Board of Education serve as non-voting members of the Roundtable.
Year started 1998 (year council began meeting on voluntary basis; enabling statute was enacted in 1999)
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding Legislative appropriation and foundation funds. In 2005-2007, Indiana received a National Governors Association Honor State grant, which helped support the council's work.
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The Education Roundtable adopted Phase I of "Indiana's P-16 Plan for Improving Student Achievement" in October 2003.

The 2003 plan includes the following 10 components (more details on each component in the plan):

Early Learning and School Readiness
Academic Standards, Assessment and Accountability

School and District Leadership and Governance

Eliminating Achievement Gaps and Ensuring Academic Progress for All Students

Dropout Prevention

Ensuring College/Workforce Success

Higher Education and Continued Learning

Teaching and Learning

Communication

Effective Use of Technology and Efficient Use of Resources
In addition:

Rigorous High School Curriculum: The Education Roundtable heads up the Indiana Core 40 Scholars Initiative, the state's version of the State Scholars Initiative program, which invites business leaders into schools to make presentations to 8th graders on the importance of completing a challenging high school curriculum in achieving future academic and career goals. Students agree to complete a rigorous high school curriculum.

The Education Roundtable is leading Indiana's participation in the American Diploma Project.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes–the council is co-chaired by the governor and the state superintendent.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body

Indiana’s Education Roundtable is charged with ensuring the state has world-class academic standards for student learning. The Roundtable led the comprehensive work to adopt new expectations for English/language arts, mathematics and science in 2000 and social studies in 2001 that ranked the state’s standards among the very best. The Roundtable continues to maintain this high quality through an on-going cycle of rigorous review and benchmarking. Updated standards for English/language arts were adopted in 2006, Social Studies in 2007 with mathematics scheduled for 2008 and science 2009.

The Roundtable completed work in April 2008 on the state’s Core Standards – to explicitly highlight the "big ideas" all students must understand at the end of each grade-level and content area and to connect key concepts across the K-12 curriculum – giving proper weight to the essential skills students need to advance.

The Roundtable has the ongoing responsibility for setting passing scores for the state’s assessments to measure student achievement against the standards.

Many of the "Next Steps" called for in the P-16 Plan for Improving Student Achievement have been realized through the work of the Education Roundtable. Acting on recommendations called for by the Education Roundtable,

The state has put policies in place to ensure all students are prepared for college and workforce success:

  • Indiana’s requirements for high school graduation have been aligned with the demands of college and work.
  • The state’s differentiated diploma requirements have been externally benchmarked and are now among the best in the nation.
  • Indiana Core 40 has become the default high school course and credit requirement for all students (effective Class of 2011).
  • Core 40 End-of-Course Assessments have been developed and implemented to focus on quality and consistency of Core 40 courses.
  • Core 40 completion is now the minimum college admissions requirement for the state’s 4-year universities (effective fall 2011).

Significant state high school dropout policies have been enacted, including:

  • Prevention policies – new dropout age, revoking driver’s licenses and work permits, early warning sign information via the Annual School Performance Report.
  • Intervention policies – School Flex to provide more options for students to stay in school and additional alternatives to dropping out, Double Up and PL 185 to provide more opportunities for students to see themselves as college materials and to get a jump start on college.
  • Recovery policies – Fast Track to provide more incentives and greater options for students who already made the mistake of dropping out of high school to get back on track to learning.

In addition, in response for Roundtable recommendations for increased early learning, Governor Daniels pushed for and was successful at moving state policies and funding to provide full-day Kindergarten.

State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-16 council: IND. CODE ANN. § 20-19-4-1 et seq.; Cheryl Orr, Staff Liaison, Indiana’s Education Roundtable
P-16 council Web site: http://www.in.gov/edroundtable/

Iowa
P-16 Councils
Name of council State Board of Education*

Although the Iowa Learns Council was created by executive order in 2003 by former Governor Vilsack, the council has not been reconvened by the new gubernatorial administration.

However, the state board of education oversees early childhood, K-12, community colleges, and all teacher and administrator preparation programs in the state, fulfilling at least part of the function of a P-16 council.
Sources P-16 council: Governor Vilsack Executive Order 30; Judy Jeffrey, Director of Education, Iowa Department of Education
P-16 council Web site: http://www.state.ia.us/iowalearns/

Kansas
P-16 Councils
Name of council Governor's P20 Education Council
Coordinating body Office of the governor
Membership As established in the executive order, the 14 voting members of the council include:

Early Learning (1):
Kansas Children's Cabinet
K-12 Education (6):
Kansas State Board of Education (2 members)

One representative from each of the following:
-Kansas Parent Teacher Association
-A Kansas teachers association
-United School Administrators of Kansas
-Kansas Association of School Boards

Postsecondary (3):
Kansas Board of Regents (2 members)
Kansas Association of Independent Colleges

Education and/or Business (4): Four at-large governor appointees from the state's business and industry or education community

Ex officio members (7): Secretary of Commerce
Chairs of house and senate education committees
Ranking minority members of house and senate education committees
Commissioner of Education
President/CEO of Kansas Board of Regents
Year started 2008
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding No outside funds. The department of education and board of regents will provide any necessary financial support.
Council meets at least once a quarter Not determined as of April 2008
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Not determined as of April 2008.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
Notes/Citation: However, the April 2008 executive order directs the council to "establish benchmarks to promote the council's commitment to success."
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The April 2008 executive order specifies that the governor will appoint the chair of the council.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date (executive order issued March 2008)
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
Sources P-20 council: Executive Order 08-05; Kate Wolff, Deputy Director of Governmental Affairs, Office of Governor Kathleen Sebelius
P-20 council Web site: http://www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=2880

Kentucky
P-16 Councils
Name of council Kentucky P-16 Council
Coordinating body Leadership of the council rotates between the state higher education coordinating board (Council on Postsecondary Education) and state board of education; during the year that one entity chairs the council, the other entity provides staff support.
Membership As of March 2008, the 18 members include the following:

Early Learning (1):
Director, Early Childhood Development, Kentucky Department of Education

K-12 Education (7):
Commissioner of Education
Kentucky Board of Education (3 members)
Education Professional Standards Board (2 members = chair and executive director)
Office of Career and Technical Education (executive director)

Postsecondary (5):
Council on Postsecondary Education (4 members = president and 3 CPE members)
Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (executive director)

Government (1):
Secretary, Education Cabinet

Business (2):
Department for Workforce Investment (commissioner)
Workforce Investment Board (a business and labor representative)

Other (2):
Kentucky Adult Education (vice president)
Representative of local P-16 councils
Year started 1999
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
List of issues/initiatives council is addressing P-16 Data System: The P-16 council endorsed the creation of a data system linking K-12 and postsecondary student records. Various other data initiatives in which the P-16 council played a role, including the revised high school feedback report, are outlined in the September 2007 report, Kentucky P-16 Collaboration: A Review After Eight Years.

High School Graduation Requirements: The council strongly advocated for the enhanced graduation requirements approved by the state board of education in February 2006.

Transitions from High School to Postsecondary: In 2000-2001, the council convened teams of K-12 teachers and administrators and postsecondary faculty to develop recommendations on what P-12 educators, postsecondary institutions (including colleges of education) and classroom teachers at all levels should do to reduce the need for postsecondary remediation in English and math. Focus groups of parents, employers, labor leaders, students who had participated in postsecondary remediation, and chief academic officers of public postsecondary institutions reviewed the recommendations and provided their suggestions. The council endorsed these recommendations, some of which were included in the Kentucky Board of Education's 2006 revised high school graduation requirements.

In 2001, Kentucky was selected as one of the five pilot states for the American Diploma Project (ADP). When the benchmarks were released in 2004 at the end of the pilot, Kentucky postsecondary institutions agreed on college-ready skills that would guarantee placement in credit-bearing courses in English and math. The P-16 council endorsed this postsecondary placement policy. Students who can demonstrate achieving these benchmarks in English and mathmatics through threshold ACT scores or their equivalents are guaranteed placement into credit-bearing courses at postsecondary institutions throughout the state.

The P-16 council has been a vehicle for various other initiatives on transitions to postsecondary, outlined in the September 2007 report, Kentucky P-16 Collaboration: A Review After Eight Years.

Postsecondary Access and Success: The September 2007 report, Kentucky P-16 Collaboration: A Review After Eight Years outlines a variety of efforts on which the P-16 council has served as the vehicle, such as the state GEAR UP grant, "Go Higher" campaign to encourage postsecondary enrollment, and regional stewardship program.

Teachers/Administrators: The P-16 council has been a vehicle for numerous activities outlined in the September 2007 report, Kentucky P-16 Collaboration: A Review After Eight Years. They include yearly teacher quality summits, 2+2 teacher preparation agreements, participation in the State Action for Educational Leadership Project (SAELP), a Title II teacher quality enhancement grant and development of the principals' academy as directed by 2006 legislation.

E-Learning and Online Resources: The September 2007 report, Kentucky P-16 Collaboration: A Review After Eight Years details various online efforts in which the P-16 council has had a hand, including www.kyeducators.org, the Kentucky Early Mathematics Testing Program, Kentucky Virtual Schools, the Go Higher Web portal, the Kentucky Education Network and the Kentucky Learning Content Repository.

Communications: The P-16 council endorsed a statewide public communication campaign to promote postsecondary education for all Kentuckians.
State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
Notes/Citation: The state has established the goal of doubling the number of bachelor degree holders in Kentucky between 1997 and 2020, to 580,000 by 2020. More details are available on the Council on Postsecondary Education Web site http://cpe.ky.gov/doublethenumbers/. The Council on Postsecondary Education CPE holds itself accountable for college readiness of Kentuckians. In addition, as of March 2008, the P-16 council is working on developing P-16 indicators of progress.
Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Chairmanship alternates between the Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) and the Kentucky Board of Education (KBE). In 2008, the council is chaired by a member of the state board of education.
Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body Most of the following information is quoted from the Council on Postsecondary Education Web site

P-20 Data System: The P-16 council endorsed the creation of a P-20 data system. While the development of the data system is in progress as of April 2008, inclusion of individual student identifiers in all high school transcripts has been completed.

Teaching Quality/Math and Science/Middle Grades: The P-16 council endorsed large-scale projects to improve mathematics and science teaching in the middle schools.

High School Student Attitudes: The P-16 council endorsed a large-scale statewide survey of high school age youth about their attitudes toward postsecondary education.

High School/Postsecondary Alignment and Transitions: The P-16 council sponsored Kentucky's participation in the American Diploma Project (ADP) to help align high school graduation standards with specified postsecondary and employment needs. ADP participation led to the establishment of a statewide postsecondary placement policy, revision of high school graduation requirements and accountability assessments, and revision of adult education curricula.

The council promoted the development of the Kentucky Early Mathematics Testing Program, which provides diagnostic testing to high school students to help them identify academic deficiencies that they should correct before entering college.

The P-16 council also sponsored a $20+ million statewide GEAR UP grant to prepare economically disadvantaged middle school students for college.

In addition, the P-16 council sponsored statewide teams of P-12 teachers and postsecondary faculty in mathematics and literacy who recommended consistent expectations for student learning to reduce the need for postsecondary remediation.

Teaching Quality: The P-16 council promoted funding proposals for innovative approaches to teacher education and endorsed statewide symposia of chief academic officers and deans of arts and sciences and education to improve the preparation and teaching effectiveness of P-12 teachers.

Distance Learning and Teaching Quality: The P-16 council coordinated involvement of the Kentucky Virtual University in projects to extend the access of education to students of all ages and to expand professional development opportunities for teachers.
State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Legislation requires the creation of local P-16 councils through competitive grants. As stated in statute, each local P-16 coucil must "promote the preparation and development of teachers, the alignment of competency standards, and the elimination of barriers that impede student transition from preschool through baccalaureate programs." The RFP for local council formation sets forth the eligible applicants, required activities, and other elements related to the local councils. 

Local P-16 councils must report annually on their activities and recommendations "to its members and the institutions they represent, the Kentucky Board of Education, the Council on Postsecondary Education, and the Education Professional Standards Board."

As of March 2008, there are 20 local councils, and one local council in development.
Sources P-16 council: KY. REV. STAT. ANN. § 164.033; Dr. Dianne Bazell, Assistant Vice President, Academic Affairs, Council on Postsecondary Education
P-16 council Web site: http://www.cpe.ky.gov/committees/p16/

Louisiana
P-16 Councils
Name of council Louisiana maintains two councils that convene P-16 stakeholders: (1) the Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence and (2) the High School Redesign Commission. Both are included in this database.
Coordinating body Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: Office of the governor

High School Redesign Commission: State department of education/state board and office of the governor
Membership Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: The 36 members of the commission include:

K-12 Education (14):
State Superintendent of Education
Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (2 members)
Two district superintendents (one rural, one urban)
Elementary, Middle and High School Principal of the Year
Elementary, Middle and High School Teacher of the Year
Personnel director
School board member
Topic specialist - K-12 education

Postsecondary (14):
Commissioner of Higher Education
Board of Regents (2 members)
Louisiana Community and Technical College System
University president
University provost
Three university deans
Two university faculty members
PK-16+ Coordinator
Pre-service teacher
Topic specialist - higher education

Government (3):
Governor's education policy advisor
Senate (President of the Senate's designee)
House education committee (chair)

Business/Community (5):
Five representatives of business and the community at large


High School Redesign Commission:
As provided in statute, the 42 members of the commission (effective with the enactment of 2008 H.B. 721) include:

K-12 Education (23): State superintendent of education or designee
State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (four members)
2004 Louisiana High School Teacher and High School Principal of the Year
A recent public high school graduate

One representative from each of the following:
-Louisiana Federation of Teachers
-Louisiana Association of Educators
-Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana
-Louisiana Association of Special Education Administrators
-Louisiana Parent-Teacher Association
-Louisiana Nonpublic School Commission

Two representatives from each of the following:
-Louisiana Association of School Superintendents
-Louisiana Association of Principals
-Louisiana Association of School Executives

Four representatives of the Louisiana School Boards Association

Postsecondary (5):
Commissioner of higher education or designee
Board of Regents (chairman or designee)
University of Louisiana System (president or designee)
Louisiana Community and Technical College System (president or designee)
Dean of a college of education of a Louisiana public college or university

Government (3):
Govenor or designee
House and Senate education committee chairs or designees

Business (3): Department of Labor (secretary or designee)
Louisiana Workforce Commission (chairman or designee)
Louisiana Task Force on Workforce Competitiveness (two members)

Business, Civic, Labor or Community (4):
Four representatives from business, civic, labor or community organizations

Other (3): Office of Youth Development (deputy secretary or designee)
Adult Learning Task Force (two members)
Year started Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: 1999

High School Redesign Commission: 1994
Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.)
  • P-16
    Notes/Citation: The High School Redesign Commission is P-16 in scope.
  • P-16+
    Notes/Citation: The Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence is P-16+ in scope.
Made permanent by executive order or statute
  • Yes—statute
    Notes/Citation: The High School Redesign Commission began meeting on a voluntary basis in 1994, was established by executive order in 1999, and was established in statute in 2005.
  • No—informally established
    Notes/Citation: The Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence is a voluntary partnership.
  • Advisory only or has authority Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: Advisory only

    High School Redesign Commission: Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: The council's work is viewed as a joint effort of the governor's office, board of regents and board of elementary and secondary education (BESE), with each agency providing support where available. So, for example, the governor's office has provided telephone lines, the board of regents helps cover travel costs and costs for speakers when necessary, and the BESE has provided support for specific needs that fall under its purview.

    High School Redesign Commission: Funds to cover travel costs are provided by the budget of the High School Redesign Office in the department of education.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: Yes–the commission meets 5-6 times between the months of September to May.
    High School Redesign Commission: Yes–the commission's meeting schedule varies between 4-6 meetings a year.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: No

    High School Redesign Commission: No, although agency staff, including the Director of High School Redesign in the department of education, support the commission on an as-needed basis.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: The commission focuses on the recruitment, preparation and certification of teachers and educational leaders. Their work to redesign all teacher and educational leadership preparation programs at all public and private universities in the state has included creating a new certification structure, strengthening undergraduate programs, and developing three new alternative teacher certification pathways, including the Practitioner Teacher Program.

    High School Redesign Commission: The commission's 2006 report provides recommendations in six areas of high school reform. These areas include: 

    • High School Redesign: The commission has issued recommendations on state policies related to the creation of small learning communities, 9th grade, and linking high school redesign with accountability.
    • Early Warning Systems, Remediation and Credit Recovery: Efforts on this front are in the implementation phase. An early warning system database has been developed. State funds have been allocated to provide credit recovery, and the commission will be evaluating methods of ensuring the credit recovery initiative is implemented consistently across the state and meets student needs, while maintaining the quality of courses students receive. The commission has also been involved in the development of a grade 9 initiative, which involved 54 schools in the 2007-2008 school year and that will continue (and hopefully expand, depending on funding), in the 2008-2009 school year.
    • Helping Students Prepare for College: Based on the commission's recommendations and with the commission's support, the state is working to develop an education and career planning Web site, and to provide training to adults to help students use the Web site. In addition, the state is hoping to expand access to career/technical education (CTE) through dual enrollment (including the TOPS Tech Early Start program) and close collaborations with business and industry via job shadowing and internship programs. The commission works closely with individuals involved in TOPS Tech so that the diploma requirements and scholarship criteria are aligned.
    • Ensuring Rigor and Relevancy in the High School Curriculum: The commission has issued recommendations on increasing the rigor of courses all students must complete for high school graduation, and on implementing end-of-course exams to ensure that course content across the state meets equally high expectations.
    • Dual Credit: The commission has recommended that the state increase access to dual credit opportunities for college-bound as well as workforce-bound students. As a result, the state is piloting a statewide dual enrollment program and is expanding postsecondary learning opportunities through Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate.
    • Communications/Building Public Support: With the commission's support, the state is pursuing various activities to communicate high school redesign efforts to various stakeholders and the general public. These communications efforts are informed by focus groups with business and industry representatives, parents, and others, along with roundtable committees of business leaders and community and technical colleges. In late 2007-early 2008, state officials also met face-to-face or in conference calls with district superintendents and other interested policymakers about high school redesign effort. Department staff hope to go out into the field to address questions from various stakeholders: What does HS redesign mean to you as a parent, business leader, etc. Development of the Web site and work in the field have just begun as of May 2008, and will continue through the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence has set the goal of increasing the number of teachers prepared by the state university system by 15%. In 2005, the High School Redesign Commission established the following goals for 2015: (1) Increase the graduation rate from 62% to 80% and reduce the dropout rate from 6.9% to 3.5%; (2) Increase access to postsecondary education from 41% to 51%; (3) Increase readiness for postsecondary education, as demonstrated by increasing the number of students scoring 18+ on the ACT English section from 67% to 72% and on the ACT math section from 29% to 34%; and (4) Enhancing graduates' workforce readiness by increasing the number of graduates earning Academic and/or Career Technical Endorsements from 5.4% to 31.2%.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: No. The commission is co-chaired by a member of the board of regents and the board of elementary and secondary education (BESE).

    High School Redesign Commission: No. The commission is chaired by the chair of the board of elementary and secondary education (BESE).
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: The redesign of all teacher preparation and educational leadership preparation programs at all public and private universities is a direct result of the recommendations of this commission.

    As a result of the commission's recommendations, the state's teacher certification structure has changed. The state formerly offered a 1-8 and high school certification; this has been replaced with certifications for grades PK-3, 4-5, and 6-12.

    The commission was also instrumental in the development of three new pathways for individuals to become certified as teachers through an alternative certification process. The Blue Ribbon commission issued recommendations which were subsequently developed into policy by the board for elementary and secondary education and the board of regents.

    High School Redesign Commission: The rigorous Louisiana Core 4 Curriculum was approved by the state board (BESE) in 2007 as the default high school curriculum, beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2008-2009 school year (Class of 2012). This more challenging curriculum was approved based on recommendations made by the commission.

    The BESE decision to award grant funds to support 54 Grade 9 Academies beginning in the 2007-2008 school year was based on the commission's recommendation.

    A commission recommendation informed the BESE's 2007 decision to incorporate a "graduation index" into high school accountability systems. Schools are awarded additional points for each student who complete college-level coursework (dual enrollment, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate) or who earns a high school diploma with an academic endorsement or career concentration.

    Commission recommendations informed various BESE's 2007 policy changes regarding remediation and credit recovery. Revised policies allow students in danger of failing due to excessive absences to make up missed time in class sessions held outside the regular class time, and permit students who have failed a course to take a proficiency exam for that course. A 2007 BESE policy change also added a new section to state regulations, allowing districts to implement credit recovery programs for students who have failed a course.

    The state board action in 2006-2007 to begin implementing end-of-course assessments in a variety of disciplines was also influenced by the commission's recommendation.

    As a result of the commission's recommendations, the state is (as of May 2008) contracting with a public relations firm, and will be launching Web site that will provide user-friendly access to information about high school redesign in the state.

    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: No. While a couple local (district/university) PK-16+ councils remain from earlier efforts, they are not closely linked to the blue ribbon commission. The commission is currently considering efforts to revitalize/expand a network of local/regional PK-16+ councils.

    High School Redesign Commission: No. High school redesign coordinators (connected to the state-level high school redesign commission) are in place in four of the eight regions of the state. As of May 2008, the department is hoping to receive funds allowing high school redesign coordinators to be placed in the other four regions of the state.
    Sources Blue Ribbon Commission for Educational Excellence: Jeanne Burns, Associate Commissioner for Teacher Education Initiatives, Governor's Office/Board of Regents
    Commission Web site: http://www.doe.state.la.us/Lde/bese/856.html, http://asa.regents.state.la.us/TE/brc

    High School Redesign Commission: LA. REV. STAT. ANN. § 17:3951; Kathy Mouton, Executive Director of High School Redesign, Louisiana Department of Education
    Commission Web site: http://www.doe.state.la.us/lde/hsr/2045.html

    Maine
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Pre-K through Adult Advisory Council
    Coordinating body No information available as of May 2008.
    Membership As established in the executive order, the 15 voting members of the advisory council include:

    K-12 Education (3):
    Commissioner of Education
    State Board of Education (two members)

    Postsecondary (6):
    University of Maine System (chancellor)
    University of Maine System Board of Trustees (chair or designee)
    Maine Community College System (president)
    Maine Community College System Board of Trustees (chair or designee)
    Maine Maritime Academy (president)
    Maine Maritime Academy Board of Trustees (chair or designee)

    Government (1):
    Legislative Youth Advisory Council (representative)

    Business (4): Four members of the business community

    Other (1): Maine Adult Education Association (representative)

    Ex officio members (3): Department of Administrative and Financial Services (commissioner)
    Department of Labor (commissioner)
    State Planning Office (director)
    Year started 2008. However, alignment efforts have been undertaken in the past, including a 2004 executive order establishing the Task Force to Create Seamless Pre-Kindergarten Through Sixteenth Grade Educational Systems. In 2005, the task force submitted its final report, which included specific recommendations for creating seamless P-16 education systems.
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority No information available as of May 2008.
    Source of council's funding No information available as of May 2008.
    Council meets at least once a quarter No information available as of May 2008.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No information available as of May 2008.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The April 2008 executive order charges the council with recommending to the governor a plan that:
    • Furthers the goal of increasing the percentage of adults with a four-year degree to 30%
    • Furthers the goal of raising the high school-to-college rate to 70%
    • Leverages pre-K through adult resources and technologies
    • Finds further efficiencies in education administration at all levels.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The advisory council is to recommend to the governor a plan for increasing the percentage of adults with a four-year degree to 30% and for increasing the high school-to-college rate from 55% to 70%.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the commissioner of education.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date. However, the April 2008 executive order establishing the council requires the council to submit a report to the governor by January 1, 2009, that includes recommendations and "any legislation necessary to implement recommendations."
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: Executive Order 12 FY 08/09; Wanda Monthey, Team Leader/Policy Director, P-20 Team: Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, Maine Department of Education
    P-20 council Web site: None available as of May 2008

    Maryland
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P-20 Leadership Council
    Coordinating body Leadership team (executive committee that includes the office of the governor, state department of education, University System of Maryland, state higher education commission, department of business and economic development, and department of labor, licensing and regulation)
    Membership As established in the executive order, the 35 voting members of the council include the following:

    Early Learning (1):
    Expert in early childhood education

    K-12 Education (7):
    State Superintendent of Schools
    State Board of Education (member)
    Expert in career and technology education (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
    Representative of:
    -local superintendents
    -local boards of education
    -K-12 teachers
    -K-12 principals

    Postsecondary (14):
    Secretary of Higher Education
    Chancellor of the University System of Maryland
    Chairman of the Maryland Higher Education Commission
    Expert in career and technology education (also listed under "K-12" above)
    Two representatives of community colleges
    Two representatives of independent colleges or universities
    Representative of public institutions of higher education outside the University System of Maryland
    Representative of college or university deans with responsibility for a STEM discipline
    Four representatives of the University System of Maryland

    Government (1):
    Governor or designee

    Business (7):
    Secretary of Labor, Licensing and Regulation
    Secretary of Business and Economic Development
    Chair and Executive Director of the Governor's Workforce Investment Board
    Three representatives of the business community

    Undefined (max. 6):
    Up to six additional members appointed by the governor
    Year started 2007 (replaces earlier voluntary K-16 Leadership Council)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing As of April 2008, the P-20 council has had one meeting, so development of the council's agenda is in the early stages. However, the council's efforts will be focused on improving student achievement and promoting workforce skills through a statewide approach that ensures every student has a chance to succeed in school and in the workplace (cf. Executive Order 01.01.2007.20).

    Work is underway to respond to the governor's charge to address:

    Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): The council's first task force will be appointed in spring 2008 and will focus on STEM. The task force will include high-level representatives of P-12 and higher education, business, and governmental agencies.

    Career and Technical Education (CTE)

    The Critical Role of the Principal
    The impact of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process in Maryland in 2008 has increased the urgency of addressing these issues.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: Executive Order 01.01.2007.20; Patricia A. Foerster, Education Policy Advisor, Office of the Governor
    P-20 council Web site: http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/divisions/leadership/programs/P-20_Partnership/

    Massachusetts
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time.

    Michigan
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State Board of Education*

    The state board has many direct supervisory duties in connection with local school districts and community colleges and indirect coordinating duties for the four-year state colleges and universities.
    Sources P-16: http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,1607,7-140-5373-10506--,00.html

    Minnesota
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Minnesota P-16 Partnership
    Coordinating body Rotates according to which entity is chairing the council (i.e., higher education, K-12). The council is currently chaired by the president of the University of Minnesota through 2009. Prior to that, the council was chaired by the head of the Minnesota State College and University System; before then, the commissioner of education chaired the council. The next chair will most likely be a K-12 entity.
    Membership The 2007-2009 council membership includes 21 organizations, with each organization represented by one voting member (usually the organization's chief executive officer). An executive team of leaders from six organizations leads the council, under the auspices of the chair and vice chair.

    K-12 Education:
    Minnesota Association of Charter Schools
    Minnesota Association of School Administrators
    Minnesota Association of Secondary School Principals
    Minnesota Department of Education
    Minnesota Elementary School Principals Association
    Minnesota Independent School Forum
    Minnesota Parent Teacher Association
    Minnesota School Boards Association

    Postsecondary:
    Minnesota Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
    Minnesota Career College Association
    Minnesota Office of Higher Education
    Minnesota Private College Council
    Minnesota State Colleges and Universities
    University of Minnesota

    Business:
    Minnesota Business Partnership
    Minnesota Chamber of Commerce

    Other:Citizens League 
    Education Minnesota
    Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota
    Minnesota Council on Foundations
    Minnesota Minority Education Partnership
    Year started 2002
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the budgets of participating agencies.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The following are council priorities during the current chairmanship (2007-2009). Language quoted from working groups Web pages.

    K-16 Data Systems: "The Data System Working Group should coordinate and complete the implementation of a common student identifier that follows students in Minnesota from kindergarten through the completion of postsecondary education. The working group should also develop recommendations for the P-16 Partnership Roundtable on the design and implementation of a broader statewide data system that will make it possible to link diverse data sets to analyze and enhance student success in preK-12 and higher education."

    K-12 Science Instruction: "The Science Instruction Working Group should identify policies and practices that will increase the capacity of teachers, principals, mentors and other adults to help students from all backgrounds meet and exceed state academic standards in science and develop a lifelong interest in science and related fields. In particular, the group should work to identify instructional best practices in elementary and secondary science education that can be disseminated through the State of Minnesota’s new Math and Science Academies and other professional development initiatives."

    K-12 Science Standards: "The Science Standards Working Group should develop broad recommendations for strengthening and enhancing Minnesota’s K-12 academic standards in science. The working group should seek to promote alignment between Minnesota’s K-12 science standards and: (a) the science readiness expectations of postsecondary institutions in Minnesota and around the country, and (b) recognized national and international science education frameworks."

    Postsecondary/Workforce Readiness: "The Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Working Group should develop a clear and concise definition of readiness for postsecondary education and high-skill, high-wage employment in Minnesota and a plan to disseminate that definition across the state. This definition of readiness should identify the academic content knowledge and the habits of mind that students need not only to gain admission to a postsecondary institution or to secure high-skill employment, but to succeed once they are in college or on the job. Minnesota’s readiness definition should be designed to provide the state’s diverse students, families, educators and communities with understandable and actionable information that can be used to guide preparation for life after high school. It should promote both individual student success and systemic change across schools, districts and the state as a whole."

    The council has completed work in:

    English Language Arts/Mathematics Standards: The council worked to integrate college readiness standards into high school English language arts and math standards. The fruits of these efforts are currently in rulemaking, and will make their way into state-level assessments in 2011 or 2012.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The governor's education council met several times and produced "Minnesota Measures". However, the council has not endorsed these objectives.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The chairmanship rotates every two years among the six executive team member organizations. The president of the University of Minnesota is the 2007-2009 council chair.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The council was involved in the state board of education's rulemaking on the integration of college-ready English language arts and mathematics expectations in the state high school English and math standards.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: Kent Pekel, Executive Director, College Readiness Consortium, University of Minnesota
    P-16 council Web site: http://mnp20.org/index.html

    Mississippi
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council The P-20 Council, established in 2001, is currently being reconstituted based on the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Committee for the Redesign of Teacher and Leadership Preparation Programs. During this redesign phase, the original P-20 Council has been suspended, with other structures in place to deal with the issues normally brought before the council. The redesigned P-20 Council will begin its work in Summer 2008.
    Coordinating body State higher education governing board
    Membership As of January 2008, the 12 members include the following:

    K-12 Education:
    Mississippi Department of Education (5 members = state superintendent, deputy superintendent, assistant superintendent for quality professionals and special schools, executive to the superintendent for instructional programs and services, executive to the superintendent for educational accountability)

    Postsecondary:
    Institutions of Higher Learning (4 members = commissioner of higher education, assistant commissioner for academic and student affairs, director of P-16 initiatives, assistant commissioner for community and junior college relations)
    State Board for Community and Junior Colleges (3 members = executive director, associate executive director for programs, associate executive director–career and technical education)
    Year started 2001
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Source of council's funding To be determined
    Council meets at least once a quarter Not determined as of May 2008
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Not determined
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No information available
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Chairmanship will be determined when the council reconvenes in summer 2008.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: Dr. Susan P. Lee, Director of P-16 Initiatives, Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning
    P-20 council Web site: http://www.ihl.state.ms.us/academic_affairs1/p20.htm

    Missouri
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Missouri P-20 Council
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership K-12 Education:Commissioner of Education
    State Board of Education (President)

    Postsecondary:
    Commissioner of Higher Education
    Coordinating Board for Higher Education (Chair)

    Business: Department of Economic Development (Director)
    Year started 2006 (although some voluntary efforts in place before 2006)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by federal workforce in education grant through the U.S. Department of Labor.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–council meeting monthly as of January 2008.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–Rod Nunn, the council's executive director, devotes the majority of his time to supporting the council's work.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing STEM (called "METS"): The governor asked the council in 2006 to make METS-related work the focus of its efforts. Throughout 2007, P-20 council members actively supported METS Coalition efforts. More details on METS available on the P-20 council Web site.

    Longitudinal data sharing: The council has submitted an application for a $200,000 grant from the National Governors Association to improve links among data systems to provide value-added feedback reports to high schools, postsecondary institutions and the business community.

    High school/postsecondary alignment: The council has been working with the Missouri Department of Higher Education to specify course-level competencies for entry into credit-bearing postsecondary-level courses, along with exit competencies to facilitate course transfer among institutions in the state. Fifty K-12 and 300 postsecondary participants are collaborating in workgroups built around seven disciplines: (1) arts and humanities; (2) engineering and technology; (3) English and communications; (4) foreign languages; (5) mathematics; (6) science; and (7) social studies. A workgroup is convening business/industry representatives to collect feedback on the entry-level competencies, and will use the results of this survey to suggest changes to the curriculum requirements where necessary.

    Workforce development/Workforce planning for targeted industry clusters: Workforce 2025: Missouri's Labor Force of Tomorrow, the council's first deliverable, was the focus of the council's efforts in 2007 and was released in December 2007. The report highlights issues the state must tackle to meet future economic/workforce demands and provides recommendations for future efforts. In addition, state agencies participating in the council have launched an initiative to align worker supply with skill requirements in eight industry clusters in the state. Also see "high school/postsecondary alignment above for details on the role of industry in setting postsecondary expectations.

    The 2007 annual report identifies regional summits, postsecondary remediation and mapping "critical transition points" in the P-20 pipeline as areas of focus for 2008.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The chairmanship rotates among council members; the council may look into a permanent chairmanship in 2008.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes–one regional council currently in place.
    Sources P-16 council: MO. REV. STAT. § 160.730; Rod Nunn, Executive Director, Missouri P-20 Council; Missouri P-20 Council 2007 Annual Report
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.dhe.mo.gov/p20.html

    Montana
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council The Board of Education–the Kindergarten to College Workgroup
    Coordinating body Office of the governor
    Membership As established in the board of education resolution, the workgroup's 9 voting members include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 9):

    Early Learning (1):
    Montana School for the Deaf and Blind (representative) (also listed under "K-12" below)

    K-12 Education (3):
    State Superintendent of Public Education (or designee)
    Board of Public Education (representative)
    Montana School for the Deaf and Blind (representative) (also listed under "Early Learning" above)

    Postsecondary (2):
    Commissioner of Higher Education (or designee)
    Board of Regents (representative)

    Government (1):
    Governor or designee (designee is also a legislator and tribal member) (also listed under "Other" below)

    Other (4):
    Parent representative
    Student representative
    Tribal member (who is the governor's representative and a legislator) (also listed under "Government" above)
    Student Assistance Foundation representative

    Ex officio members (6): (or designee) Director of Department of Public Health and Human Services
    Commissioner of Labor and Industry
    Director of Department of Commerce
    Governor's Chief Business Development Officer
    Governor's Budget Director
    Governor's Chief Information Officer
    Year started 2006 (although some efforts in place before 2006)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—board of education resolution
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The governor has tasked the board of education with “homework assignments” requiring coordinated efforts by the state superintendent/office of public instruction, the board of public education and the board of regents/office of the commissioner of higher education. The kindergarten to college workgroup supports the board of education accomplishing the assignments. More details on each "homework assignment" are available through a strategic plans worksheet.

    The governor's "homework assignments" fall into the five main categories below–further information on each assignment follows:

    (1) School Readiness
        - Full-time Kindergarten

    (2) Students Ready for College and Work
        - Increasing Graduation Rates
        - Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment
        - Global Competitiveness (Math and Science)

    (3) Coordinate a Technology Network
        - Distance Education

    (4) Close Tuition and Salary Gap
        - Access
        - Affordability
        - Transferability

    (5)  Indian Education for All

    (1) School Readiness (Early Learning): Extend the availability and quality of full-day kindergarten programs to ensure that "kids are ready for school, and schools are ready for kids." In addition, representatives of the office of public instruction (OPI) and the board of regents (BOR)/the Montana University System and the department of health and human services serve on the Governor's School Readiness Taskforce. The Governor’s Economic Development Office and the Department of Public Health and Human Services partnered with the private sector to study the early childhood industry in Montana. Efforts are also underway to enhance teacher education programs for early childhood providers within the Montana University System.

    (2) College/Work Readiness: The workgroup is charged with increasing the number of students who leave high school ready for college and work. As a result, the Board of Regents (BOR) and the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education (OCHE) are working with K-12 to align high school graduation and college admission expectations in math and writing. The OCHE and the Office of Public Instruction are implementing career clusters, Big Sky Pathways, in the Perkins reauthorization. Additional components of the workgroup's efforts on the governor's "students ready for college and work" assignment are:

    • Math and Science: As part of the workgroup's charge to ensure students are ready for college and work, the kindergarten to college workgroup supports the Governor and First Lady’s focus on math and science, and is examining changes to state policies in these subject areas.
    • High School Graduation Requirements: The state board of public education is reevaluating the state's high school graduation requirements. The state superintendent is developing a college readiness campaign.
    • Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Workgroup members are working to increase the availability of dual enrollment and Advanced Placement courses, and to establish state-level dual credit/dual enrollment policies. To this end, the board of public education has convened a distance learning task force "To review and resolve K-12 education issues related to teacher qualifications/dual credit, supplement, not supplant, and funding."

    Members are pursuing various activities to reduce the achievement gap between Native/non-Native students and improve articulation and transferability between tribal colleges and other two- and four-year institutions.

    (3) Technology Framework:

    • Data Systems/Postsecondary Transfer: This is a priority area of the workgroup, with the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education taking the lead on a seamless education data system. In response to the governor's "students ready for college and work" charge, members of the workgroup are participating on the Integrated Data Management Coordination Committee and are helping develop a P-16 student data system.
    • Distance learning and dual enrollment are priority areas for the workgroup, with the Board of Public Education taking the lead. Refer to the dual credit/dual enrollment taskforce link.

    (4) Close Tuition and Salary Gap:

    • Transfer and Student Data Initiative: Aimed at facilitating the transfer of credits across Montana University System schools, improving access to the transfer and student information, and building upon existing data warehousing capacity. Distance learning and dual enrollment are priority areas for the workgroup, with the Board of Public Education taking the lead. Refer to the dual credit/dual enrollment taskforce link.
    • Postsecondary Participation and Success: The workgroup supports actions to increase college participation, especially at two-year institutions, and graduation rates. These efforts have focused around the Montana University System (MUS) remediation policy and course offerings, the math proficiency policy and placement in MUS, and implementing a writing proficiency measure for MUS placement. This is a priority of the workgroup, and the State superintendent is taking the lead on better aligning the expectations of college with hs course taking via an outreach project.
    • Teacher Quality/Recruitment: Workgroup members are addressing the availability of loan forgiveness programs and need-based financial aid and scholarships for prospective teachers, as well as the cost of postsecondary education in the state.

    (5) Indian Education: "Indian Education for All" is a constitutional requirement for public education in Montana so that students learn about the distinct and unique cultural heritage of American Indians.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the parent representative.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body Supporting the Board of Education’s policy initiatives, as articulated by the Governor’s homework assignments, the state legislature passed 2007 S.B. 2, which provides for:
    • The offering of full-day kindergarten, including additional funds to support start-up costs
    • A speech pathology program
    • Funds for the Montana School for the Deaf and Blind to hire four additional outreach consultants to provide additional birth-5 services in the state
    • Funds for American Indian Achievement Gap specialists and six curriculum specialists to assist schools in closing the Native/non-Native student performance gap
    • Funds to support gifted and talented programs
    • The expansion of adult education services
    • Tuition cap for zero percent increase for two years
    • A measure to continue to build a P-16 student data system
    • More funding for the Governor's Postsecondary Scholarship
    • The creation of the Quality Educator Loan Assistance Program, which repays the postsecondary loans of individuals who serve as teachers in shortage areas in the state.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: Board of Education Resolution to Establish the Kindergarten to College Workgroup, July 13, 2006; Jan Lombardi, Governor's Education Policy Advisor; Anna Green, First Lady Assistant/Policy Advisor, Office of the Governor; Strategic Plans - Comparative Worksheet, draft August 9, 2007
    P-20 council Web site: http://governor.mt.gov/boed/kindtocol.asp

    Nebraska
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Nebraska P-16 Leadership Council
    Coordinating body Leadership team (comprised of the Nebraska Department of Education, University of Nebraska and EducationQuest Foundation)
    Membership As of May 2008, the 35 members of the P-16 council's Steering Committee include:

    Early Learning (2):
    Nebraska Association for the Education of Young Children (executive director)
    Department of Health and Human Services (CEO)

    K-12 Education (10):
    Commissioner of Education and Deputy Commissioner of Education
    Nebraska State Board of Education (president)
    Nebraska Council of School Administrators (executive director)
    Nebraska State Education Association (executive director)
    Nebraska Association of School Boards (executive director)
    Nebraska PTA (legislative chair)
    Omaha Archdiocese (superintendent of schools)
    Lincoln Public Schools, NAACP Education Committee c/o Multicultural Administration (chair)
    Representative of Nebraska Education Service Units

    Postsecondary (8): Chancellor of Nebraska State College System
    University of Nebraska Board of Regents (chairman and member)
    University of Nebraska (president and executive vice president/provost)
    Nebraska Community College Association (executive director)
    Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Nebraska (executive director)
    Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (executive director)

    Government (4):
    Governor's Policy Research Office (director)
    Education Committee (chairperson and legal counsel)
    State Budget Office (state budget administrator)

    Business (7): Department of Economic Development (director)
    Nebraska Department of Labor (commissioner)
    Nebraska Business-Higher Education Forum (chair)
    Nebraska Chamber of Commerce and Industry (president)
    Lincoln Chamber of Commerce (president)
    Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce (president/CEO and vice president, education and workforce devt.)

    Other (4):EducationQuest Foundation (President/CEO)
    Mexican American Commission (executive director)
    Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs) (executive director)
    NAACP- Lincoln (president)
    Year started 1998
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding As of April 2008, the council's work is supported by three tiers of financial commitment:

    The "senior partners" provide funding for the council's operating budget, and include the Nebraska State Government, Nebraska Department of Education, University of Nebraska and EducationQuest Foundation.

    The "sponsoring organizations" provide some financial support for the council's work, and include the Nebraska Council of School Administrators, Nebraska Association of School Boards, Nebraska State College System, Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Nebraska, Nebraska State Education Association, Nebraska Community College Association, Nebraska Business-Higher Education Forum, Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce and Lincoln Chamber of Commerce. The Nebraska State Government–representing the Governor’s Policy Research Office, State Budget Office, Nebraska Department of Economic Development, Nebraska Health and Human Services Commission, Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education and Nebraska Legislature's Education Committee–also began providing financial support in 2006.

    The "supporting organizations" provide in-kind support for the council, and include the Omaha Archdiocesan Schools, Nebraska Association for the Education of Young Children, Nebraska PTA, Mexican American Commission, Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Lincoln Chapter).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–1.5 FTEs support the council.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Early Learning: The Nebraska P-16 Strategic Plan for 2008-2011 proposes that an "early childhood development" task force be created in 2008.

    K-12/Postsecondary Curriculum Alignment: Over a seven-year period, the council convened vertical teams of K-12 teachers and postsecondary faculty to develop a seamless curricular progression in English language arts, math and world languages.

    High School Reform: The council is collaborating with the Greater Nebraska Superintendents organization, representing the 18 largest districts outside Omaha, along with the Nebraska Council of School Administrators and the Nebraska Department of Education, to study research findings and reforms put forward by the McREL education laboratory and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Many of the participating districts have approved some reforms, and some progress has been demonstrated as a result.

    College Planning and Transitions to Postsecondary: The P-16 council participated in the development of a Web portal, Nebraska Career Connections, to provide students and their families with an online resource on postsecondary options in the state, academic preparation for college, and financial and scholarship information.

    In addition, the Nebraska P-16 Strategic Plan for 2008-2011 indicates that the council should assist in developing policies and procedures to improve student transitions from high school to postsecondary. Slated 2008 activities to support this work include the creation of a "college access" task force to develop an action plan, ongoing collaboration with the University of Nebraska to develop common admissions pathways for transition from community colleges into the university system, and cooperation with the Nebraska Council of Teacher Education "to address licensure requirements for postsecondary faculty teaching high school credit courses."

    Career Exploration & Economic/Workforce Development: FutureForce Nebraska is a coalition of K-12, postsecondary, private sector and government agencies that aims to align K-12 curriculum and instruction with the workforce and economic development needs in the state. The council has participated in FutureForce Nebraska since the coalition's inception.

    Closing the Postsecondary Participation Gap: The College Preparatory Academy seeks to increase the number of low-income and Hispanic first-generation college-goers. Middle grades students in these target populations with college-going capability are identified and invited to complete a rigorous high school curriculum and participate in activities with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln ("campus visits, university activities, visiting professors, etc.," according to the council's 2006 report). Participating students are guaranteed financial aid and participate in various activities together "(attending classes together, living in the same residence halls, working on team projects, having the same faculty advisors, etc.) to help promote their success" 2006 report). The council served as the catalyst for the development of the College Preparatory Academy.

    P-16 Data System: The Nebraska P-16 Strategic Plan for 2008-2011 indicates development of a comprehensive P-16 data system as a goal for the council. The council is helping develop and implement a data structure that will link the K-12 and postsecondary data systems. The P-16 data system will allow students and their performance to be tracked to provide performance-based data and offer feedback to improve K-12 education and the alignment of K-12 and postsecondary expectations. The strategic plan also lists identification of effective state and national practices as objectives underlying the development of a P-16 data system.

    Sustainability/Expansion: The Nebraska P-16 Strategic Plan for 2008-2011 urges the council to "seek resources to sustain and expand the P-16 initiative." Proposed activities to support this goal are (1) Identifying "internal and external resources to support P-16 initiatives" at the state and regional levels and (2) Developing/submitting "grant applications based upon strategic plan priorities."

    Communication: The Nebraska P-16 Strategic Plan for 2008-2011 identifies disseminating and communicating to various constituencies about the P-16 education pipeline as one of the council's main goals. To this end, the strategic plan calls for a number of activities, including the creation of "a P-16 Communication Committee to develop recommendations for establishing a formal P-16 communications plan." The strategic plan also calls for the implementation of a strategic communication plan to disseminate information across the state, and to collaborate with other initiatives in the state – including Building Bright Futures, FutureForce Nebraska, KnowHow2Go, Nebraska "Dream It - Do It" and the Civics Nebraska Partnership Advisory Council – to communicate the P-16 message.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is co-chaired by the president of the University of Nebraska, the CEO of the EducationQuest Foundation and the Commissioner of Education.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The council actively supported passage of 2006 L.B. 239, which authorizes in-state tuition for certain qualified undocumented Nebraska high school graduates. (Bill passed, and legislature overrode governor's veto.)

    While 2006 L.B. 1023, which would have created a Civics Nebraska Partnership Council, did not pass, the state board established a similar council, the Civics Nebraska Partnership Advisory Council at the request of Nebraska P-16.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No. However, regional councils were formerly active. One of the goals of the recently hired P-16 initiative coordinator is to develop strong regional P-16 partnerships in 2008.
    Sources P-16 council: Marty Mahler, Nebraska P-16 Coordinator; Nebraska P-16 Initiative Status Report, October 2006
    P-16 council Web site: https://p16.nebraska.edu/

    Nevada
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P-16 Advisory Council
    Coordinating body Office of the governor
    Membership As established in statute, the 11 voting members of the council include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 11):

    K-12 Education (Min. 1)
    A representative of K-12 education
    A parent of a student in a public K-12 school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
    Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "Postsecondary" and "Business" below)

    Postsecondary (Min. 1)
    A representative of postsecondary education
    A parent of a student in a public K-12 school or postsecondary institution (also listed under "K-12" above)
    Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "K-12" and "Business")

    Government (2)
    One member each of the House and Senate

    Business (Min. 1)
    A representative of private business
    Two additional members representing either K-12, postsecondary or private business (also listed under "K-12" and "Postsecondary" above)

    Other (2)
    Two members of the general public
     

    Ex officio members (2):
    Nevada Superintendent of Public Instruction
    Chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education
    Year started 2007 (although voluntary efforts in place before 2007)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–council meeting monthly as of January 2008.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing To be determined
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Statute directs the council to elect a chair from among the members; governor is not a member of the council.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: NEV. REV. STAT. ANN. 400.010 through .045; Jodi Stephens, Legislative Assistant to Governor Gibbons; Mindy Martini, Senior Research Analyst, Research Division, Legislative Counsel Bureau
    P-16 council Web site: http://gov.state.nv.us/P-16%20Council/index.htm

    New Hampshire
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P-16 Working Group
    Coordinating body No information available as of May 2008.
    Membership As established in the executive order, the 8 members of the council include:

    K-12 Education (1):
    Commissioner of Education

    Postsecondary (4):
    Chancellor of the University System of New Hampshire
    New Hampshire Community Technical College System (chancellor)
    New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission (executive director)
    New Hampshire College and University Council (executive director)

    Government (1):
    Governor's designee

    Business (2):
    New Hampshire Workforce Opportunity Council (president)
    A leader from the New Hampshire business community
    Year started 2006
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Data System: An RFP was issued in December 2007 to identify a consultant to help the P-16 Working Group think through the issues related to the development of a data system that combines P-12, higher education, workforce, economic development and demographic data "for the purpose of increasing academic success at all grade levels and expanding economic opportunities." The consultant is also to write a white paper based on the outcomes of the discussion.

    College Readiness: The council is working to identify a high school assessment that would indicate student deficiencies in reading and math. The assessment would also be used by postsecondary institutions to determine admissions and reduce the need for remediation upon college entry.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Notes/Citation: However, P-16 performance goals are currently under discussion.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the executive director of the New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: Executive Order 2006-10; Kathryn Dodge, Executive Director, New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.nh.gov/postsecondary/p16/index.html

    New Jersey
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time.

    New Mexico
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time. However, the joint higher education department (HED)/and Public Education Department (PED) Alignment Task Force, comprised of leaders in both departments, legislative leaders and representatives of the higher education institutions and school districts, performs some functions of a P-20 council in the areas of data sharing, alignment of high school competencies with college placement requirements, dual credit, and other policy areas.
    Sources P-16 council: Elizabeth Gutierrez, Director, P20 Policy and Program Development, New Mexico Higher Education Department; New Mexico Higher Education Department Web site

    New York
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Education Department*

    Statute charges the education department with "the general management and supervision of all public schools and all of the educational work of the state, including the operations of The University of the State of New York and the exercise of all the functions of the education department, of The University of the State of New York, of the regents of the university and of the commissioner of education and the performance of all their powers and duties[.]" The board of regents and commissioner of education by extension oversee early learning, K-12 and postsecondary education in the state.

    In November 2006, the state released P-16 Education: A Plan for Action, which sets forth specific actions (and related lead staff, timeframes, and resources) across the P-16 continuum.
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Sources P-16: N.Y. EDUC. LAW § 101, 301

    North Carolina
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council North Carolina Education Cabinet
    Coordinating body Office of the governor
    Membership As established in statute, the 7 members of the education cabinet include:

    K-12 Education (2):
    State Superintendent of Public Instruction
    State Board of Education (chairman)

    Postsecondary (3):
    University of North Carolina (president)
    North Carolina Community Colleges System (president)
    North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (president)

    Government (2):
    Governor
    Secretary of Health and Human Services

    As provided in statute, the cabinet may invite other representatives of education to participate in its deliberations as nonvoting members.
    Year started Established on voluntary basis in 1992 and through statute in 1993.
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) PreK-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Authority to require change. Statute provides the Education Cabinet with authority for specific components of  policy across the education continuum. The cabinet also oversees NC Virtual.
    Source of council's funding Funds to support the Education Cabinet come from the governor's budget.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes. While the full Education Cabinet meets 1-3 times a year, an unofficial "kitchen cabinet"–comprised of one staff member supporting each cabinet member–meets every 6-8 weeks, as needed.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–one staff member for each Education Cabinet member supports the cabinet.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Early Learning: The state's More at Four prekindergarten program was launched through the involvement of the education cabinet.

    High School Reform: The education cabinet is overseeing the New Schools Project, which seeks to bring innovative high school models to schools across the state, including the Learn and Earn early college high school program. Learn and Earn allows students to enter an integrated high school/postsecondary program in grade 9 so as to earn a high school diploma in five years, along with either an associate's degree, technical certification or adequate credit to enter a four-year institution as a junior. Effective with the 2007-2008 school year, Learn and Earn Online brings the program to every high school in the state. The education cabinet advocated for the development of Learn and Earn, which was later established through legislation. Also see "data systems" below.

    In addition, the education cabinet is leading the state's American Diploma Project efforts, which include Learn and Earn and other initiatives to improve the quality of learning and instruction at the high school level.

    Financial Aid: EARN Grants provide qualified low-income North Carolina high school graduates with a two-year grant. Recipients need not have participated in the Learn and Earn program but must be full-time undergraduate students at a public two- or four-year institution in the state.

    Teacher Recruitment/Retention and Teacher Working Conditions: The education cabinet has played a role in the governor's efforts to recruit a growing number of teachers (particularly in such high-need areas as special education, math and science) and assess/improve teacher working conditions.

    Data Systems: The education cabinet is involved in efforts to develop a data system that will flag Learn and Earn courses as postsecondary credit-bearing courses. The cabinet is also working to launch a data portal, allowing students and their parents to create a profile on www.cfnc.org to track students' coursetaking progress beginning as early as kindergarten, explore postsecondary and career options, and access tools to plan academically and financially for college.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The state board of education has set "Goals for the 21st Century" on various areas, including student achievement, teaching quality and leadership. The University of North Carolina (UNC) system has set goals related to student enrollment, retention and graduation, and teacher recruitment and production. UNC is also implementing graduation targets for community college associate degree transfers. While North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (NCICU) has not set performance goals, these have been set by individual member institutions.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body With support from the education cabinet, the University of North Carolina (UNC) system has revised their teacher education programs to meet the need for an increased supply of special education, science and mathematics teachers in the state. In addition, the master's of educational administration program has been revised through a 2005 budgetary item and the education cabinet's involvement.

    The state board of education has revised the state K-12 standards to bring them into alignment with the 21st Century Skills standards.

    The education cabinet advocated for the eventual codification of the Learn and Earn early college high school program, and has been active in the development and implementation of Learn and Earn Online and Earn grants.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No, although there are numerous local P-16 councils that are not directly linked to the state-level council.
    Sources P-16 council: N.C. GEN. STAT. § 116C-1; Ann McArthur, Senior Education Advisor, Office of the Governor
    P-16 council Web site: No Web site as of April 2008 

    North Dakota
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time. However, in January 2006 a North Dakota P-16 Education Task Force was convened. The task force was disbanded after submitting its final report to the joint boards–the state board of public school education, the state board of higher education, the education standards and practices board, and the state board for career and technical education–in September 2006.
    Sources P-16 council and P-16 council Web site: http://www.ndus.nodak.edu/reports/default.asp?ID=388

    Ohio
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Partnership for Continued Learning
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership Eight members are identified in statute; the remainder are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the governor. As established in statute, the current 25 voting members include the following:

    Early Learning:Child Development Council of Franklin County, Inc. (president and CEO)

    K-12 Education:
    Superintendent of public instruction
    Celina City Schools (representative of a comprehensive or compact career-technical school) (vocational director)
    Chaminade Julienne High School (a chartered nonpublic school) (teacher)
    Citizens Academy (community school/charter school) (executive director)
    Miami Valley Career Technology Center (teacher)
    Montgomery County Educational Service Center (community school/charter school) (JOB TITLE?)
    St. Christopher School (a chartered nonpublic school) (learning disabilities tutor/guidance counselor)
    SCOCA (South Central Ohio Computer Association) (distance learning coordinator)
    State board of education (member)

    Postsecondary:
    Board of regents (chancellor)
    Board of regents (member)
    Notre Dame College (president)
    Shawnee State University (president)

    Government:
    Governor
    House Education Committee (chair)
    House Education Committee (ranking minority member)
    Senate Education Committee (chair)
    Senate Education Committee (ranking minority member)

    Business:
    Department of development (director)
    State workforce policy board (president, Lorain County Community College) (= Workforce Investment Act, or WIA)

    Other:
    Battelle for Kids (executive director)
    Career center (teacher)
    KnowledgeWorks Foundation (president and CEO)
    Ohio College Access Network (president and CEO)

    The governor's education policy advisor is not a voting member, but is the council's designated chairman.

    Legislation also establishes a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subcommittee, comprised of the superintendent of public instruction, the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents, the director of development, and four members of the public. The members of the public are not at-large members of the partnership for continued learning.
    Year started 2005 (voluntary efforts in place before 2005)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the legislature through the biennial budget process–$150,000 is appropriated through the board of regents to provide the funds for salaries of staff supporting the partnership, and $150,000 is appropriated per year to the department of education to support the council operations (2007-2009 biennium).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–the partnership is supported by a full-time executive director, a .5 FTE director and a full-time administrative assistant.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing College/Work Readiness Assessment: Legislation directs the partnership to develop recommendations on assessing high school students' college- and work-readiness in English and mathematics. Draft recommendations have been developed and will be discussed at the March 2008 meeting.

    High School Graduation Requirements/College Admission Requirements: The partnership for continued learning strongly advocated for the adoption of the Ohio Core Curriculum, a set of more rigorous graduation requirements that will become the default high school curriculum effective with the Class of 2014. OHIO REV. CODE ANN. § 3345.06 requires most state universities, effective with the 2014-2015 school year, to mandate an Ohio resident complete the Ohio Core to be admitted as an undergraduate. OHIO REV. CODE ANN. § 3301.42(M) directs the partnership to provide recommendations on conditions under which univerisites might accept students who have not completed the Ohio Core. Draft recommendations have been developed and will be discussed at the March 2008 meeting.

    Dual Enrollment: Legislation directs the partnership to make recommendations on specific policy components related to dual enrollment. Draft recommendations were developed by a dual enrollment subcommittee, approved by the full council, and submitted May 31, 2007 to the governor, members of the state legislature (as specified in legislation), the president of the state board of education and the chairperson of the Ohio Board of Regents.

    Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Legislation establishes a STEM subcommittee of the partnership for continued learning, to include the superintendent of public instruction, the chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents, the director of development, and four members of the public with expertise in business or STEM fields. Legislation further requires the subcommittee to award grants to STEM schools serving students in any grades 6-12, and allows up to five STEM schools to be approved to open in the 2008-2009 school year (this limit for year one does not affect the number of schools that may be approved for operation in subsequent school years). The subcommittee must "determine the criteria for the proposals, accept and evaluate the proposals, and choose which proposals to approve to become a STEM school and to receive grants." In approving STEM school proposals, the subcommittee is required to "consider locating the schools in diverse geographic regions of the state so that all students have access to a STEM school." As of February 2008, two schools were selected to receive grants; the partnership will issue a second RFP for the other three submitted proposals to compete for up to three remaining grants.

    Legislation also directs the STEM subcommittee to "award grants to support the operation of STEM programs of excellence" serving students in any grades K-8. The measure requires the subcommittee to "give priority to proposals for new or expanding innovative programs." As of February 2008, nine schools have been selected to receive "programs of excellence" grants.

    The department of education is required to monitor the STEM schools approved by the subcommittee. If the department finds any school to be not in compliance with state law or with the proposal as approved by the STEM subcommittee, the department must consult with the subcommittee. The subcommittee may order the school to close.

    Legislation authorizes the partnership for continued learning, through the STEM subcommittee, to "make recommendations to the general assembly and the governor for the training of STEM educators."

    Legislation directs the partnership, through the STEM subcommittee, to "work with an Ohio-based nonprofit enterprise selected by the subcommittee to support the strategic and operational coordination of public and private STEM education initiatives and resources focused on curriculum development, instruction, assessment, teacher quality enhancement, leadership recruitment and training, and community engagement. The nonprofit enterprise selected by the STEM subcommittee shall have the proven ability to accumulate resources to enhance education quality across the educational continuum, from preschool to college, shall have experience in large-scale management of science and technology resources, and shall have a documented institutional mission to advance STEM education." As of February 2008, Battelle was selected as this "Ohio-based nonprofit enterprise," and the partnership is in the process of negotiating an operational agreement with the nonprofit. The nonprofit is not compensated by the state for this work.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Notes/Citation: At the March 2008 meeting, the partnership is scheduled to discuss a strategic plan for its work under the current gubernatorial administration.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes–the governor chairs the council, although the governor's education policy advisor (a non-voting member) presides over the council meetings in place of the governor.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The partnership for continued learning was very active in supporting the legislation establishing more challenging graduation requirements, the Ohio Core. The legislation was enacted in 2006.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes. Regional P-16 councils have emerged through local leadership efforts. The partnership for continued learning convenes regional P-16 directors quarterly to share best practices. The regional P-16 councils likewise alert the state-level council to challenges in their efforts to implement P-16 reform; the state-level partnership then seeks to address those challenges. The partnership released five planning grants to regional P-16 councils in 2007, and anticipates releasing competitive planning or implementation grants in spring 2008.
    Sources P-16 council: OHIO REV. CODE ANN. § 3301.41 through 3301.43, 3301.46, 3302.032, 3313.603, 3313.6013, 3326.01 through 3326.08, 3326.20, 3345.062; Julie Schaid, Executive Director of the Partnership for Continued Learning
    P-16 council Web site: www.pcl.ohio.gov

    Oklahoma
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Achieving Classroom Excellence Steering Committee (ACE Steering Committee)
    Coordinating body State department of education
    Membership As established in statute, the 22 members include the following (because members may be listed under more than one membership category, the number of members appearing under the following headings exceeds 22):
     
    K-12 Education (14): State Superintendent of Public Instruction
    State Department of Career and Technology Education (director) (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)
    A superintendent of a technology center (also listed under "Postsecondary" below)

    A member of statewide organizations representing:
    -Rural schools
    -Rural elementary schools
    -Suburban schools
    -Secondary school principals
    -Parent-teacher organizations
    -School administrators
    -School board members

    A representative of:
    -A statewide federation representing teachers
    -A statewide association representing professional educators
    -A statewide association representing teachers
    -Nonaffiliated teachers

    Postsecondary (8): State Superintendent of Public Instruction (superintendent is also a Regent for Higher Education)
    Chancellor of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
    State Department of Career and Technology Education (director) (also listed under "K-12" above)
    Four faculty members from state system institutions with expertise in English, math, science and social studies
    A superintendent of a technology center (also listed under "K-12" above)

    Government (4): State House of Representatives (Chair of common education committee and appointee of House minority leader)
    State Senate (Chair of education committee and appointee of Senate minority leader)

    Business (2): Representative from Governor's Council on Workforce and Economic Development
    Representative of a statewide coalition representing business and education

    Statute also specifies that the state superintendent may appoint additional members.
    Year started 2005 (year council began meeting as ACE Task Force; legislation enacted in 2006)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Steering committee receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–steering committee meets monthly except when the legislature is in session.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–one full-time FTE supports the steering committee.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Assessments: By statute, the steering committee must advise the state board on curriculum alignment of grade 3-8 and high school subjects tested by the end-of-instruction assessments that become the state exit exam effective with the Class of 2012. Statute also directs the steering committee to advise the state board on the review of existing and development of new assessments, determining cut scores on required assessments, and alternatives to end-of-instruction assessments that meet or exceed the rigor of end-of-instruction tests.

    Oklahoma has reviewed, revised and recalibrated the ACE Algebra I end-of-instruction exam to align with the ACE Geometry and ACE Algebra II exams. The additional end-of-instruction exams implemented for 2007-2008 include ACE Geometry, ACE Algebra II, ACE English III with a writing component.

    Remediation: By statute, the steering committee must advise the state board on "intervention and remediation strategies and delivery methods for students who do not meet" mandated standards, and on consequences for 8th graders who do not meet these standards. A subcommittee on remediation has been developing recommendations on interventions for upper elementary and middle grades students.

    Legislation requires the ACE steering committee to provide an annual report of recommendations to the state board, legislature and governor.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The ACE Steering Committee is chaired by the state superintendent of public instruction.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The ACE Steering Committee has issued recommendations that have informed legislation and agency rulemaking on such areas as cut scores on state assessments, as well as the depth of knowledge students must demonstrate; and alternate tests for high school graduation for students who do not pass the end-of-instruction tests required for high school graduation effective with the Class of 2012.

    S.B. 1769, which relates to ACE policy, is in the Oklahoma State Legislature for review as of early May 2008. The end of the legislative session is May 23, 2008.

    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No, although there is a local P-16 council that is not directly linked to the state-level council.
    Sources P-16 council: OKLA. STAT. ANN. tit. 70, § 1210.525; Sandy Garrett, State Superintendent of Public Instruction
    P-16 council Web site: No Web site as of April 2008, although a page http://www.sde.state.ok.us/ACE/default.htm on the Oklahoma Department of Education Web site provides information on the remediation and intervention component of the ACE Steering Committee's work.

    Oregon
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Joint Boards
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership The 18 members include all members of the two boards:

    K-12 Education (7):State Board of Education

    Postsecondary (11):
    State Board of Higher Education

    There is also a working group that is a subset of the Joint Boards that consists of three members of each board.
    Year started 1998
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Authority–policies approved by the Joint Boards apply to all sectors K-16 and must be adopted by the K-12 and postsecondary governing board in the state.
    Source of council's funding Modest legislative appropriation but mainly supported through participating state agencies (department of education, department of community colleges and workforce development, state university system).
    Council meets at least once a quarter No. Joint boards meet at least once a year.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Alignment of K-12/Postsecondary Standards and Assessments: The Unified Education Enterprise (UEE) committee is working to better align K-12 standards and assessments–and particularly those at the high school level–with postsecondary entry-level expectations. To this end, the UEE contracted with WestEd to evaluate the state's content standards and assessments, and the alignment of state assessments with K-12 content standards. The alignment evaluation and standards review have been completed. The alignment studies between K-12 and postsecondary assessments are under discussion by the state board of education (SBE) and other stakeholders.

    Dual Credit Opportunities: The Unified Education Enterprise (UEE) is in the process of reviewing the offering of dual credit opportunities in the state, including the standards used to evaluate program quality and student learning/success. OR. REV. STAT. § 340.085 also requires the department of education to annually report to the joint boards of education on the Expanded Options Program, the state's dual enrollment program.

    Postsecondary Entry and Articulation: The Unified Education Enterprise (UEE) has established common policies across Oregon Community Colleges and the Oregon University System institutions for the amount of postsecondary credit to be awarded for Advanced Placement exam scores, and develop, as required in 2005 S.B. 342, "an outcome-based framework for articulation and transfer that is derived from a common understanding of the criteria for general education curricula."

    The UEE is also improving state means to communicate the postsecondary options available to students, and the points of entry and transfer in the two- and four-year systems. This includes standardization of a two-year AA transfer degree for general education course work, a similar one-year transfer module, and development of several high-need pathway programs to increase enrollment in areas such as nursing and engineering.

    Data Systems: The Oregon Department of Education is developing the KIDS, the Pre-K Through 16 Integrated Data System. As stated on the Oregon Department of Education Web site, the purpose of KIDS is "to provide the department of education and stake-holders with a single, accurate, and authoritative data structure that streamlines data acquisition and reporting within the enterprise of education in the state, while enhancing students’ transcript exchange across schools and districts, promoting operational efficiency, and satisfying key NCLB & AYP reporting requirements." The KIDS system creates an electronic student transcript that can be shared among K-12 districts as students transfer residency. A subset of that transcript is being used by Oregon Community Colleges and the Oregon University System as students move into the postsecondary environment.

    Community Colleges and the Oregon University System have also been developing systems that permit the exchange of data. All public universities and community colleges now have the ability to send and receive electronic transcripts through a national system hosted by the University of Texas at Austin. The Integrated Data Transfer System (IDTS) also builds on this to allow high schools to submit electronic transcripts to universities. Currently, more than 20 high schools submit transcripts in this way. When the system is complete, all public high schools should be able to participate. Discussions is ongoing about the need for high school data connected to community colleges, but the best method for linking that data may not be the high school transcript, which currently is used only in specialized programs.

    Planning is underway to provide feedback to high schools about the performance of their students as a result of participating in IDTS. Several sessions have been held to gather input on the appropriate kinds of data that would be useful to inform school improvement and college preparation. The currently published report, with more limited high school information, can be found at http://ir.ous.edu/hsprofile/getSchool.do.
     
    The Joint Boards has played an active role in the development and implementation of these various efforts to improve student data and data transfer systems.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: Each agency has state established performance measures that form a P-16 continuum. More details on these performance measures are available at http://www.oregon.gov/DAS/OPB/docs/obm/Education_Analysis.doc and http://www.oregon.gov/DAS/OPB/obm.shtml
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The joint boards working group is co-chaired by the chairs of the state board of education and the state board of higher education.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body As a result of the joint boards' efforts, Oregon has adopted changes for common awarding of postsecondary credit in Oregon University System and community colleges for Advanced Placement exam scores.

    As of April 2008, the joint boards are working on various issues that will culminate in policy regarding dual credit to provide early high school options for college credit, alignment of standards and assessments, and other areas.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: OR. REV. STAT. § 348.890, 340.085; Salam Noor, Assistant Superintendent for the Office of Educational Improvement and Innovation, Oregon Department of Education; Unified Education Enterprise Workplan, June 13, 2007
    P-16 council Web site: No Web site as of April 2008

    Pennsylvania
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Pennsylvania maintains two areas of P-16 work: (1) the STEM PK-20 Leadership Team, Design Team and Regional Networks; and (2) an extensive network of regional councils supported by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Both are included in this database.
    Coordinating body STEM: Governor's Leadership Team. None (all members of the leadership team are seen as equal partners).
    PASSHE Regional Councils: Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE)
    Membership STEM: As of April 2008, the 35 members of the Leadership Team include:

    Early Learning (1):
    Departments of Public Welfare and Education (deputy secretary, Office of Child Development and Early Learning)

    K-12 and Postsecondary (2): State board of education (chair)
    Lehigh Career and Technical Institute (executive director)

    K-12 Education (6): 
    Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Education
    Pennsylvania State Education Association (president)
    3 representatives of teachers and local superintendents

    Postsecondary (7):Chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
    Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania (president)
    Delaware County Community College (president)
    Montgomery County Community College (president)
    Saint Francis University (president)
    University of Pennsylvania (former dean) 
    Harrisburg University of Science and Technology (provost and associate professor of management)

    Government (5):
    Governor's office
    Senate education committee co-chairs
    House education committee co-chairs

    Business (9): Department of Community and Economic Development (secretary and deputy secretary)
    Pennsylvania Workforce Investment Board (executive director)
    Pennsylvania Economic Development Association (president)
    Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry (acting secretary)
    Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Pennsylvania State Council (executive director)
    3 representatives of private business

    Other (5):
    Department of Environmental Protection (president)
    Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Inc. (president)
    Team Pennsylvania Foundation (2 representatives)
    Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (doctor)

    The council's work is also supported by a Design Team that includes diverse PK-20 representation from various state agencies, institutions of higher education, the state workforce investment board, business, foundations and non-profits.

    PASSHE Regional Councils: Varies by council but include universities, public school and district leadership, businesses, community colleges, non–system institutions as well as other partners.
    Year started STEM: 2007
    PASSHE Regional Councils: 2000
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority STEM: Advisory only
    PASSHE Regional Councils: Advisory only
    Source of council's funding STEM: National Governors Association and Team Pennsylvania Foundation
    PASSHE Regional Councils: Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE), the Pennsylvania Department of Education and various state and federal grants as well as foundation funding
    Council meets at least once a quarter STEM: Governor’s Leadership Team meets biannually and the Design Team meets monthly. Regional STEM networks are currently creating their schedules.
    PASSHE Regional Councils: No. Regional councils meet at least biannually, but dates vary based on the needs of the partnerships.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person STEM: Two FTEs support the council, along with over 30 part-time cross-agency, cross-sector volunteers.
    PASSHE Regional Councils: Yes–the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education provides a .75 FTE to support the councils' work.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing STEM: The goal of the STEM PK-20 Leadership Team, Design Team and Regional Networks is to dramatically increase P-20 students (especially females, minorities and the underrepresented) in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics careers while continuing the development of effective strategies to retain, recruit and retrain our incumbent workforce in these critical fields.

    Short-term objectives are to:

    1. Organize Five Regional STEM Networks that develop Regional STEM Strategies;

    2. Create a long term (10 Year) Pennsylvania STEM Strategy;

    3. Implement a Communication Strategy to promote the PA STEM Strategy;

    4. Secure Resources to support and sustain the PA and Regional STEM strategies;

    5. Publish an Analysis of the Critical Gaps between the demand for STEM education and skills in the future and the future supply of those same skills (called a Gap Analysis); and

    6. Create an inventory of STEM Best Practices in P-20 education and workforce development.

    PASSHE Regional Councils: The regional PK-16 councils have initiated efforts in the following areas:

    Literacy and Math: Increased the emphasis on literacy and mathematics instruction in the PK-12 schools.

    Technology: Enhance technology integration into both university and PK-12 curricula to increase student interest and improve student achievement.

    State Standards and Course Redesign: Redesign courses at both the university and PK-12 levels to reflect the Commonwealth’s academic standards.

    Postsecondary Preparation: Encourage PK-12 students to improve their academic achievement in order to prepare for postsecondary education.

    Teacher Recruitment: Encourage PASSHE university students to aspire to education careers in urban schools.

    Teacher Preparation:

    • Modify and enhance courses for pre-service teacher candidates.
    • Increase opportunities for field placements of preservice teacher candidates and involvement of university faculty in PK-12 schools.
    • Increased the emphasis on literacy and mathematics instruction in the university teacher education programs

    Teacher Professional Development:

    • Provide a variety of professional development opportunities for inservice PK-12 educators, including targeted courses and workshops offered at school sites and on university campuses.
    • Pair university and PK-12 faculty in study groups and action research projects based in PK-12 schools. 

    Professional Development Schools: Many of the regional PK-16 councils are engaged to varying degrees in the establishment of professional development schools (PDSs). These are public schools in which universities focus special efforts and resources, including field placement and student teaching, professional development (including onsite coursework) for inservice teachers, assistance for school administrators, and joint PK-12-university study groups and action research projects. These relationships often lead to university program revisions based upon what is learned in the PDSs.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The STEM council has established long-term goals aimed at increasing the number and diversity of STEM majors and workers. Goals relate to teacher quality, including in high-poverty schools; preparing and motivating more students in STEM subjects; aligning state P-16 STEM education standards and assessments with postsecondary and workforce expectations; and increasing the number of skilled STEM workforce in the state by increasing the number of STEM majors/courses in 2- and 4-year institutions and industry certification programs. More information can be found at http://www.psi.camp7.org/DocumentHandler.ashx?DocId=3538.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor STEM: Yes
    PASSHE Regional Councils: No
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body STEM: None to date due to the recent formation. The Governor’s Leadership Team is charged with coordinating high level policy as it pertains to the nexus between STEM literacy, economic growth and workforce development
    PASSHE Regional Councils: The regional councils impact policy in multiple ways, including policies of local districts and institutions of higher education. One example is the Slippery Rock Council that has expanded the concept of the PK-16 partnership to create professional development schools that increase and deepen the field experiences for pre-service students and provides an opportunity in-service teachers to have continued professional development from the university.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils STEM: Yes. As of April 2008, there are five regional councils.
    PASSHE Regional Councils: The commonwealth supports the councils through the collaboration between universities and the school districts. However, each council works locally to achieve its goals.
    Sources STEM council: Sue Mukherjee, Special Assistant to the Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Education
    STEM council Web site: http://www.psi.camp7.org/Default.aspx?pageId=54370
    PASSHE Regional Councils: Steve Pavlak, Associate Vice Chancellor for School and University Programs, Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE)
    PASSHE Regional Councils Web site: http://www.passhe.edu/executive/academic/academy/pkcouncils/Pages/default.aspx

    Rhode Island
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Statewide PK-16 Council
    Coordinating body None (various participating entities serve coordinating roles)
    Membership As established in 2005 and 2007 executive orders, the 10 members include the following:

    K-12 Education:
    Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education (chair) 
    Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education

    Postsecondary:
    Board of Governors for Higher Education (chair)
    Commissioner of Higher Education
    Representative of independent higher education in Rhode Island (as of February 2008, this is a Johnson and Wales University representative; the institution chairing independent colleges and universities commission in a given year serves as the independent higher education representative on the PK-16 council)

    Government:
    Governor

    Business:
    Department of Labor and Training (director)
    Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (executive director)
    Rhode Island Economic Policy Council (chair)
    Human Resources Investment Council (chair) (= chair of the governor's workforce board) (Workforce Investment Act, or WIA)
    Year started 2005 (although voluntary efforts in place before 2005. See January 2004 memo for additional background.)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by various sources, including the governor's office infrastructure. The board of governors for higher education provides meeting space; funds to hire consultants for various projects have come from the higher education and K-12 agencies' budgets. The 2005-2007 National Governors Association Honor State grant helped support discrete initiatives endorsed by council.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No. While the contributions of staff at various participating agencies would add up to a .5 FTE, the council employs no single staff person in this capacity.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The quotes following each topic area are derived from the 2005 executive order establishing the council and reflect areas in which the council is directed to recommend policies to the appropriate board or agency.

    P-16/Workforce Data System: "Create a unified data system to connect information between our elementary and secondary education system, post secondary institutions and workforce development programs[.]" Higher education has a fully functional unit data record system, while the K-12 data system is currently under construction. Links will be created between the courses students complete in high school (and student grades in those courses) and those students' subsequent postsecondary outcomes. It is not clear at this time that the state will ultimately create a unified data system, but the data system in development will provide key information on the impact of high school coursetaking and achievement on postsecondary entry and success.
     
    In addition, an agreement has been made with labor and training to link the postsecondary data system with wage records. The state will issue a report on the link between graduates of higher education in the state and workforce outcomes. 

    Mathematics/Science Achievement: "Support the recommendations of the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Math-Science Achievement and track our State’s progress[.]" The governor's office has hired a staff person to review math and science metrics. A number of discrete programs have been launched in the state; the PK-16 council has been involved with the math/science initiatives noted on the governor's Web site.

    College-Ready English/Mathematics/Science Standards: "Align standards for achievement in reading, writing, and mathematics so that students graduating from Rhode Island high schools are fully prepared for college-level work[.]" The council has developed college-ready standards for English language arts (encompassing reading and writing), mathematics and science. These standards have been evaluated and approved by Achieve.

    Embedding College-Ready Standards in High School Assessments: To follow up on the standards alignment work, the state plans to embed the college-ready standards in the grade 11 assessments in reading, writing, mathematics and science first given in fall 2007. Higher education faculty are examining the assessment to determine the minimum level of student performance necessary for a student to avoid remediation at the postsecondary level.

    Work-Ready High School Standards: "Link achievement standards with employer expectations[.]" Achieve's evaluation of the English language arts, mathematics and science standards included an evaluation of whether the standards adequately prepared high school students for entry into the workplace (see "College-Ready English/Mathematics/Science Standards" above). The council is now working to encourage Rhode Island business leaders to look at these subject-area standards.

    Postsecondary Connections to K-12: A project to catalog connections between Rhode Island postsecondary institutions and K-12 schools has recently been completed, to determine the level of involvement institutions have with local school systems. Several hundred programs were counted; a report on these connections will be released in March 2008.

    Dual Enrollment/Dual Credit: "Establish formal high school credit-based transition programs with higher education institutions[.]" In 2006, Jobs for the Future completed an analysis of current dual enrollment/dual credit efforts. With the assistance of the Statewide PK-16 Council, the state is now undertaking a major initiative to expand dual enrollment/dual credit programs, and allocated $400,000 in 2008 to build the infrastructure for a statewide program and expand program access for low-income students.

    Low-Income Students' Access to Postsecondary: "Provide better pathways to higher education for low-income residents." The state convened the Task Force on Groups Underrepresented in Rhode Island Public Higher Education, from which a report was issued in November 2006. A team was charged with following up on specific recommendations made in the 2006 report.

    Teacher/Leadership Quality: "Improve the quality of teachers and educational administrators who lead schools, districts, and school-related initiatives." The mandate from council has been to evaluate teacher standards and make changes to leadership programs. This has resulted in Rhode Island College's complete revamp of its education leadership program. The Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has also revised its teacher certification standards as a result of the council's efforts.

    Economic/Workforce Development: "Produce a more competitive workforce and promote economic development through quality education, research and workforce development[.]" The council has been very involved in revamping the state's adult literacy system, to raise the skills and knowledge of lesser skilled adults to meet the needs of the state economy. Members of the PK-16 council also sit on the Governor's Workforce Cabinet, the work of which is ongoing.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The council was involved in the alignment of high school standards in English language arts (reading and writing), mathematics and science with entry-level postsecondary and workplace expectations. In addition, higher education faculty weighed in on the grades 9-12 grade span expectations (GSEs) in reading, writing and mathematics expectations. These GSEs were formally adopted by the state board of regents after input from the higher education community.

    The state has launched a number of mathematics and science initiatives through the support of the Statewide PK-16 council. Further details about these initiatives are available on the governor's Web site.

    The council's focus on teacher and leadership quality has led to the state department of education's revision of the teacher certification standards.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: Executive Order 05-08, Executive Order 07-04; January 14, 2004 memo by Jack Warner to members of the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education; Dr. Jack Warner, Commissioner of Higher Education
    P-16 council Web site: No Web site as of February 2008

    South Carolina
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Education and Economic Development Coordinating Council
    Coordinating body State department of education
    Membership

    As established by statute, the 27 members of the council must include the following, who must represent the geographic regions of the state and be representative of the state’s ethnic, gender, rural and urban diversity:

    K-12 Education (6):State Superintendent of Education or his designee
    A school district superintendent
    A principal
    A school guidance counselor
    A teacher
    A director of a career and technology center

    Postsecondary (5):South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (Executive Director or his designee)
    State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education (Executive Director or his designee)
    President or provost of a research university
    President or provost of a four-year college or university
    President of a technical college

    Government (3):Chairman of the Education Oversight Committee or his designee
    House and Senate member

    Business (13):
    South Carolina Employment Security Commission (Executive Director or his designee)
    Department of Commerce (Secretary or his designee)
    South Carolina Chamber of Commerce (Executive Director or his designee)
    Ten representatives of business, including at least one representative of small business

    Year started 2005
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) K-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Legislative support for the council is built into the department of education's budget.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–as of April 2008, the council is meeting monthly.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–five department of education staff contribute a portion of their time to supporting the council.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The council has created six committees, each focusing on a different scope of work. More details on the council's efforts can be found in the council's Second Annual Report on the Implementation of the Education and Economic Development Act of 2005, issued December 2007.

    At Risk Students: In response to S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-59-150, the At Risk Student committee partnered with Clemson University's National Dropout Prevention Center to identify over 40 "exemplary" and "promising" evidence-based models, initiatives and programs districts and schools can use to assist students at risk of dropping out or being inadequately prepared to transition to the next level of schooling or the workforce. The At-Risk Student Intervention Implementation Guide is a result of these efforts, as is a state board regulation.

    Guidance and Career Counseling: The Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling, Career Clusters, and Individual Graduation Plans Committee has taken on a significant scope of work related to career clusters, guidance counseling and personnel issues, and Individual Graduation Plans (IGPs). The committee has helped develop materials (1) To help high school counselors in developing student IGPs (2) To evaluate the efforts of middle school career specialists; and (3) To assist the district-level career/counseling coordinators required by statute.

    Regional Education Centers: The Regional Education Centers committee is assisting in the development of Regional Education Centers, described on the council Web site as "matchmakers" to help connect students, educators and the public with "providers of the services they need."

    Articulation and Dual Enrollment, High School Graduation and Postsecondary Entrance Alignment: This committee is addressing the directives set forth in S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-59-210, which requires the Commission on Higher Education to convene the Advisory Committee on Academic Programs "to provide seamless pathways for adequately prepared students to move from high school directly into institutions of higher education" and to make recommendations on dual enrollment courses acceptable for postsecondary credit at institutions governed by the commission on higher education.

    Communication and Marketing: Because S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-59-170(B) calls for the development of a statewide communications and marketing plan to promote statewide awareness of the provisions of the 2005 Education and Economic Development Act (Title 59 of the state code), the council's Communication and Marketing committee has contracted with and is guiding the work of a public relations firm. One result of these efforts is www.scpathways.org, a Web portal providing information about the state's Personal Pathways to Success initiative related to career majors, individual graduation plans, and other efforts to guide students' curricular and career decisionmaking during secondary school.

    Information Technology: Since many of the efforts included in the Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA) and Personal Pathways are related to data collection, data sharing and integrated technology, the council has created an Information Technology Committee to assist in the development and implementation of the necessary IT systems, including virtual regional education centers and a statewide e-transcript system.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Council is chaired by a former member of the South Carolina House of Representatives.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The council's 2007 report notes numerous efforts either completed or in progress to address the assignments set out in the Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA), Title 59 of the South Carolina Code.

    Among the completed assignments are:
    • Revision of the department of education's guidance and counseling model to provide districts with standards and strategies to use as they develop and implement a comprehensive guidance and counseling program in grades P-12.
    • Integration of the department's school guidance and counseling program model, including career awareness and exploration activities, in the grade 1-5 curriculum.
    • The state board's 2007 adoption of 43 S.C. CODE ANN. REGS. 274.1, which establishes indicators, predictors and barriers for high schools to use in identifying at-risk students, requires every high school to implement one or more model programs for at-risk students by the 2007-2008 school year, and requires all high schools to evaluate their dropout prevention programs using specified criteria.
    • The commission on higher education's 2007 approval of a statewide International Baccalaureate (IB) credit acceptance policy.
    • Department development of a template for an individual graduation plan that meets specifications set forth in legislation.

    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes. The council is to develop regional education centers, each of which must "have an advisory board comprised of a school district superintendent, high school principal, local workforce investment board chairperson, technical college president, four-year college or university representative, career center director or school district career and technology education coordinator, parent-teacher organization representative, and business and civic leaders."
    Sources K-16 council: S.C. CODE ANN. § 59-59-170, 59-59-180, 59-59-210; Sabrina Moore, Education and Economic Development Coordinating Council Staff Team Leader, South Carolina Department of Education; Second Annual Report on the Implementation of the Education and Economic Development Act of 2005
    K-16 council Web site: http://ed.sc.gov/agency/Accountability/Regional-Services/Teach-SC-Pathways/Education-and-Economic-Coordinating-Council.html

    South Dakota
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P21 Advisory Council
    Coordinating body State department of education and board of regents
    Membership As of April 2008, the 21 members include:

    K-12 Education (3):
    Secretary of Education
    Board of Education (president and vice president)

    Postsecondary (4):
    South Dakota Board of Regents (Executive Director, plus board president and vice president)
    Western Dakota Tech (two-year institution) (president)

    Government (6): Governor's Senior Policy Advisor
    House and Senate Education Committee chairs
    Senate Majority Leader and Speaker Pro Tempore
    Representative

    Business (8): South Dakota Chamber of Commerce and Industry (president)
    Seven business leaders representing varied workforce interests from across the state
    Year started 2007
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-21
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Partnership for 21st Century Skills: The partnership is the primary focus of the council's efforts.

    As of April 2008, the council is formulating a long-term agenda that will include additional components of work.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The state's "2010 Education" (or "2010E") initiative establishes six goals for the state to achieve by the year 2010. The goals address 3rd grade proficiency in reading and math; the percentage of students going on to college, technical school or advanced training; postsecondary performance and completion; teacher recruitment, retention and training; improved educational outcomes for Native American students; and the K-12 funding formula. More information is available on http://www.2010education.com/.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by a program director from Jobs for the Future.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-21 council: Janelle Toman, Director of Information and Institutional Research, South Dakota Board of Regents; June 19, 2007 department of education press release
    P-21 council Web site: http://doe.sd.gov/secretary/P21Initiative/

    Tennessee
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Tennessee P-16 Council
    Coordinating body State higher education commission
    Membership The nine members of the council include:

    K-12 Education (2):
    Commissioner of Education
    Tennessee State Board of Education (executive director)

    Postsecondary (4):
    Tennesee Board of Regents (chancellor)
    Tennessee Higher Education Commission (executive director)
    Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association (president)
    University of Tennessee (president)

    Government (1):
    Governor's Office (representative)

    Business (2):
    Tennessee Business Roundtable (executive director)
    Tennessee Chamber of Commerce (president)
    Year started 2005 (although some efforts in place before 2005)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Authority to require change. 2007 H.B. 99 gives oversight of cooperative innovative high school programs (such as early college high schools) to the "consortium for cooperative innovative education." The P-16 council serves as this consortium.
    Source of council's funding Council receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter No. Council meets at least once a year.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing P-16 Data System: The council serves as one of the agencies collaborating in developing the state's longitudinal data system, designed to connect student records from early learning through postsecondary education.

    High School to Postsecondary/Work Transitions: Through its participation in the American Diploma Project (ADP), the P-16 council is working to align high school standards and graduation requirements with college and workplace expectations. Tennessee joined the ADP network in January 2007, agreeing to require high school graduates to take challenging courses that prepare them for life after high school, to streamline assessments to allow test students take in high school to serve as readiness tests for college and work, to hold high schools accountable for graduating students ready for college and careers, and to hold postsecondary institutions accountable for students' success once enrolled. As an early part of those efforts, the P-16 Council directed the work of the Math Curriculum Alignment Committee that focused on curriculum standards and expectations for high school math courses and their alignment with college entrance expectations. The completed work of this committee was provided to the Tennessee Diploma Project (TDP). With input from business and Achieve, Inc., the TDP has successfully revised curriculum standards for K-12 mathematics and English language arts and is continuing its work to align assessments. Work continues on alignment of university admission requirements with new high school graduation requirements and alignment of first-year college math and English general education courses with revised K-12 standards.

    In addition, 2007 H.B. 99 authorizes local districts and public postsecondary institutions to create "cooperative innovative programs" such as early college high schools, which allow students to complete a high school diploma and two years of college credit five years after high school entry. The P-16 council serves as the "consortium" called for in the legislation to oversee cooperative innovative high school programs–including these programs' articulation, alignment and curriculum development–and to evaluate the success of students in such programs. The legislation directs the consortium "to develop a plan for the rollout of new cooperative innovative programs in a staggered manner and as quickly as possible so that by the 2009-2010 programs shall be available throughout the state."

    2007 H.B. 99 also directs the consortium to "oversee the development of a high school to community college and technology center articulation agreement that will build on the existing technical preparation pathway and that will govern the articulation of courses between the public high schools of this state and the community colleges and technology centers." The bill authorizes the consortium to "undertake curriculum alignment and articulation itself or by appointment of a curriculum alignment committee or committees."

    Postsecondary Access and Success: The council advises the state's GEAR UP state grant to foster college readiness and access among low-income students, beginning in the middle grades.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: Advancing P-16 alignment is a constant in the strategic planning of the agencies represented on the council, and each agency sets goals through its master plan. Performance goals for higher education institutions are embedded in all the work of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) through the assessment construct of performance funding in which institutions are held accountable for retention rates, graduation rates, and support for at-risk students. Under the advisement of the state P-16 council, GEAR UP TN has goals for each of its established benchmarks.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The P-16 council was active in the revision of high school graduation requirements in the state. More details are available in a document from the January 2008 state board of education meeting.

    The council has played a role in K-12 and high school curriculum changes. The Math Curriculum Alignment Committee brought together secondary and postsecondary math and education professionals to align closely the content standards and performance expectations for secondary math courses and college entrance expectations. The resulting detailed analysis was provided to the Tennessee Diploma Project to assist and inform the revision of K-12 math standards through the Tennessee Diploma Project (TDP). Curriculum standards for K-12 mathematics and English language arts have been revised to prepare students for challenging high school coursework leading to success in college and careers.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes. As of March 2008, there are 19 local councils and 12 regional councils associated with the Tennessee Board of Regents. The local councils implement what is proposed at the state and regional level. Local councils are also doing work specific to local needs, including working with GEAR UP TN efforts to organize meetings of local and regional partners.
    Sources P-16 council: Linda Doran, Associate Executive Director for Academic Affairs, Tennessee Higher Education Commission; Deborah Boyd, Associate Executive Director for P-16 Initiatives, Tennessee Higher Education Commission
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.tn.gov/thec/Divisions/PPR/planning/p16.html

    Texas
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P-16 Council
    Coordinating body State department of education and higher education coordinating board
    Membership Statute specifies five members of the P-16 council; however, while the executive director of the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) is by statute a member, legislation later moved the SBEC's duties under the purview of the Texas Education Agency.

    Statute also authorizes the co-chairs to "appoint three additional members who are education professionals, agency representatives, business representatives, or other members of the community." Such additional members "serve two-year terms expiring February 1 of each odd-numbered year." As of Feburary 6, 2008, membership includes:

    K-12 Education:
    Commissioner of Education (by statute)
    Fort Worth Independent School District (superintendent) (term 2007-2009)

    Postsecondary:
    Commissioner of Higher Education (by statute)
    Odessa College (president) (term 2007-2009)

    Business:
    Texas Workforce Commission (executive director) (by statute)
    Maverick Engineering, Inc. (vice president, systems development) (term 2007-2009)

    Other:
    Commissioner of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (by statute)
    Year started 2003 (year enabling legislation enacted; prior voluntary effort, the Public Education/Higher Education Coordinating Group, started in 1998)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—statute
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the agency under the purview of the council chairman (chairmanship alternates between the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board). As of March 2008, the higher education coordinating board is supporting the council.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No–staff are assigned to support the council on an as-needed basis.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing 2006 legislation directed the P-16 council to recommend "a college readiness and success strategic action plan to increase student success and decrease the number of students enrolling in developmental" courses when they enter postsecondary education, and to report to state-level policymakers every other year on progress made in implementing the action plan. The first such progress report was issued December 2006.

    The P-16 council also maintains subcommittees focused around the following areas of work:

    Dual Credit
    : Legislation directs the council to conduct a study examining the offering of dual credit opportunities in the state. In response to this charge, the Student Academic Preparation and Readiness committee issued recommendations in January 2007 on improving dual credit opportunities in the state (including Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and dual enrollment).

    Teacher Quality
    : The Educator Quality committee addresses issues related to teacher recruitment, retention, preparation and professional development. A 2007 report provides detail on recommendations the committee made during the 2006-2007 fiscal year.

    Adult, Career and Technical Education: This committee is charged with making recommendations to the council on actions that would increase student participation and success in the workforce and higher education. In January 2007, the committee's developmental education subcommittee issued recommendations on developmental education.

    Access to Information: The Texas P-16 Public Information Resource (TPEIR) committee oversees the Texas PK-16 Public Education Information Resource, which provides data on high school and postsecondary graduation, dual credit, transition from high school to postsecondary and teacher certification tailored for use by parents, legislators, educators and researchers.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Notes/Citation: However, local and regional councils are encouraged to look at P-16 performance goals on their own.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. By statute, the council is co-chaired by the commissioner of education and the commissioner of higher education.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body The higher education coordinating board adopted rules in 2006 for the implementation of the P-16 College Readiness and Success Strategic Action Plan. These rules were informed by recommendations issued by the P-16 council.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes. As of March 2008, about 20 local or regional councils have been created to address local issues and nurture a college-going culture in their area. As this chart sets forth, local councils notify regional councils of issues in their environs. A representative from each regional council brings these issues to the P-16 regional council state network, which in turn informs and responds to information from the state-level P-16 council.
    Sources P-16 council: TEX. EDUC. CODE ANN. § 61.076; Dr. Raymund Paredes, Commissioner of Higher Education
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=4767; http://www.p16texas.org/ (site on regional councils)

    Utah
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Utah K-16 Alliance
    Coordinating body State board and board of regents
    Membership As of April 2008, the 15 members of the K-16 Alliance include:

    K-12 and Postsecondary Education (3):Three individuals serving on the board of regents and on the state board of education

    K-12 Education (4):
    State Superintendent of Public Instruction and Associate State Superintendent
    State Board of Education (chair and vice chair)

    Postsecondary (4):
    Commissioner of Higher Education and Associate Commissioner
    State Board of Regents (chair and vice chair)

    Government (4):
    Governor and Governor's Deputy for Education
    Representative
    Senator
    Year started 2006
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) K-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—board of education resolution
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Alliance receives no outside funds (participating agencies provide "pro bono" support).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Rigorous High School Curriculum: The K-16 Alliance is sponsoring the Utah Scholars, the State Scholars Initiative (SSI) in the state. The program brings community and business leaders into secondary school classrooms to encourage them to complete a rigorous high school curriculum, and invites these leaders to partner locally "to provide ongoing academic and financial support to students in participating schools-everything from incentive programs for students, to mentoring and tutoring services, to scholarships and employment opportunities for students who obtain Utah Scholar status" ((Utah Scholars Web site) The K-16 Alliance is also encouraging all high school students to complete a rigorous high school curriculum called the Utah Scholars program. The student preparation and success committee is a key component of these efforts.

    Guidance and Counseling: The guidance and counseling committee is spearheading efforts to reframe the information high school counselors provide students about going to college (and how that information is provided), in order that more students will have accurate information and ultimately choose to enroll in postsecondary education.

    High School/Transitions to Postsecondary: The curriculum/assessment committee is considering methods of improving articulation from high school to postsecondary, especially in the areas of mathematics and composition.

    Dual Enrollment: The concurrent enrollment committee is examining how concurrent enrollment programs in the state are funded and delivered.

    Minority/Disadvantaged Students and Postsecondary: The minority and disadvantaged committee is examining how to increase the number of minority and disadvantaged students who enter postsecondary institutions in the state.

    Access and Participation Committee

    Postsecondary Retention: The retention committee is evaluating how the state might improve efforts to keep students in postsecondary programs until graduation/program completion.

    Teacher Recruitment and Quality: In March 2007, the K-16 Alliance received a report from its Special Task Force on Teacher Shortages. The report provides five sets of recommendations, upon which the teacher education committee is building its work, seeking to improve teacher recruitment through competitive teacher salaries, using efficiency models to expand the number of days teachers are employed, and enhancing teacher recruitment in such high-need areas as math and science.

    K-16 Data Collection System: The alliance has participated in efforts to develop and implement a K-16 data collection system with a common student identifier.

    Workforce
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No information available
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is co-chaired by the chairs of the state board of education and board of regents.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body No information available as of May 2008.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils Yes. Councils forming on individual campuses are supported by the state-level K-16 Alliance.
    Sources K-16 council: Lucille Stoddard, Associate Commissioner for Academic Affairs and Teddi Safman, Assistant Commissioner for Academic Affairs, Utah State Board of Regents; October 17, 2007 memorandum from then-Commissioner Richard E. Kendell to the State Board of Regents
    K-16 council Web site: http://science.uvu.edu/k16alliance/

    Vermont
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council State does not have a P-16 or P-20 council at this time.

    Virginia
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council P-16 Education Council
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership As established by executive order, the 22 members of the council include:

    Early Learning (1):
    Preschool education representative

    K-12 Education (2):
    Superintendent of Public Instruction
    Board of Education (president)

    Postsecondary (5):
    State Council of Higher Education (director plus chairman)
    Virginia Community College System (chancellor)
    Virginia Community College Board (president)
    A representative of private colleges

    Government (5):
    Secretary of Education
    House of Delegates (two members)
    Senate (two members)

    Business and Other (9):
    Nine citizen members are to include educators, and business and community leaders

    The govenor may appoint additional members at his discretion.
    Year started 2005
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order

    Notes/Citation: The current executive order is set to expire this July 2008. However, a new executive order will be established and there is an intention to introduce legislation to codify the council in the 2009 General Assembly session.

    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council was supported in 2005-2007 by the National Governors Association Honor States Grant. While no new funding was included in the state's most recent budget, the secretary of education’s office will provide support to the council’s needs.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–council meeting every other month as of April 2008.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Postsecondary/Workforce Readiness: During the P-16 council's first year of work (2005-2006), the chairman appointed a committee to develop recommendations on issues related to improving students' readiness for postsecondary education and the workplace. The council's 2006 report presents these recommendations, which address (1) Developing common statewide postsecondary readiness standards for secondary and higher education institutions; (2) Aligning high school course content with postsecondary/workforce expectations; (3) Preparing middle grades students for high school work through specific activities; (4) Increasing the number of high school students who complete rigorous coursework, including dual enrollment, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate, by completing the Advanced Studies Diploma, industry certification, or other measures of career/technical proficiency, and implementing the Commonwealth Scholars program; (5) Improving student transitions through K-12 and postsecondary through various specific activities designed to improve high school graduation and postsecondary entry and completion.

    The council's 2007 report likewise provides recommendations on how the state might improve high school graduates' readiness for postsecondary education and the workplace.

    In 2006-2007, the council chair solicited feedback from the postsecondary and business community on whether the American Diploma Project (ADP) English and mathematics benchmarks for college/work readiness reflect the skills and knowledge needed for entry-level postsecondary and career success. Faculty teams at 30 postsecondary institutions reviewed the benchmarks. The teams concurred with the ADP benchmarks, identified the most critical areas of knowledge and skill, and offered insight into the most widespread academic shortcomings of entering college students. The council has also identified other benchmarks of readiness for successful postsecondary/work entry that will guide the development of a common state definition of college and workforce readiness.

    The council is also working to compare the alignment of the Standards of Learning (SOL) against existing nationally validated college-readiness standards. An Alignment Team is in the process of comparing the SOL against ADP benchmarks. Once the alignment studies are complete, the council will issue recommendations to the state board to include in the scheduled review of the math SOL beginning in 2008 and English/language arts and science SOL beginning in 2009.

    The council provides some oversight of the Commonwealth Scholars Program, Virginia's version of the State Scholars Initiative, which requires participating students to complete a rigorous high school curriculum and invites business leaders to make presentations to eighth-grade students on options available to them after high school and the level of education they must achieve to reach their goals.

    Honor State Work: The Honor State work began in 2005 and concluded in 2007. The council commissioned the International Center for Leadership in Education to provide a report on high-performing high schools in the state, and the policies and practices that support these schools' success. The council also commissioned a report on remedial courses at Virginia community colleges, including the number of students in such courses, the subjects in which students were enrolled in developmental courses, methods colleges used to determine student need for remediation and ways for high schools to address deficiencies before graduation.

    The council is working to create a communications plan to better inform the public about the state's Honor Schools efforts in 30 schools across the state. The council contracted with a public relations firm in August 2007 to begin developing a public communications campaign to build public support for changes in education policy and to encourage students to complete challenging coursework and diploma options. As of April 2008, this work is still underway.

    The council also served as the fiscal agent for various other activities supported by NGA Honor State funds: (1) The Virginia Association of Secondary School Principals provided Breaking Ranks II training to 22 principals of Honor Schools in the state, teaching them strategies to mentor and provide technical assistance to teachers in their buildings; (2) Training for 100 Advanced Placement and dual enrollment teachers; (3) Teacher training in the Strategic Instructional Model, which equips teachers with "content-focused instruction and research-validated instructional strategies," which especially benefit special education students; (4) Additional training and endorsements for math and science teachers in Honor Grant schools and feeder middle schools; (5) Supplemental Project Graduation opportunities at Honor Schools; (6) Expansion of the Algebra Readiness Initiative; (7) Stipends to cover PSAT fees at all 30 Honor Schools; (8) Supplemental workshops and training for high school counselors at Honor Schools and other high schools; (9) Training and placement of Career Coaches to guide students in Honor Schools; More details on these activities can be found on pages 26-30 of the 2006 report and page 15 of the 2007 report the P-16 council issued to the governor and general assembly.

    Workforce Readiness: The council hosted a workforce readiness policy forum in November 2007, convening human resource educators, economic developers and other stakeholders to develop recommendations on the issue. More details on pages 9-10 of the council's 2007 report.

    Data Systems: In 2005-2006, the P-16 council chairman also called for a data systems working group to create recommendations to facilitate the development of a P-16 data system; identify existing data and uses for data; and identify data gaps and potential solutions. The P-16 council's 2006 report and 2007 report provide the council's recommendations on the development and enhancement of a P-16 data system.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The P-16 council's 2006 report (http://www.education.virginia.gov/Initiatives/P-16Council/P-16Council-InitialReport.pdf) proposes goals to help the state improve middle grades students' preparation for rigorous high school work, increase the number of students completing IB, AP and other rigorous high school courses, and increase the proportion of 18- to 24-year-olds in college.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the secretary of education, although the governor periodically attends meetings to be updated on the council's work.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body No policy changes have been enacted to date. However, the council is working to compare the alignment of the Standards of Learning (SOL) against existing nationally validated college-readiness standards. An Alignment Team is in the process of comparing the SOL against ADP benchmarks. Once the alignment studies are complete, the council will issue recommendations to the state board to include in the scheduled review of the math SOL beginning in 2008 and English/language arts and science SOL beginning in 2009.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: Executive Order 40 (2006); Executive Order 100 (2005); Kendall Tyree, Special Assistant, Office of the Secretary of Education
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.education.virginia.gov/Initiatives/P-16Council/index.cfm

    Washington
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council The Governor's P-20 Council
    Coordinating body Office of Financial Management (governor's budget office)
    Membership As established in executive order, the 14 members include the following:

    Early Learning:Washington Learns Early Learning Council (chair)
    Department of early learning (director)

    K-12 Education:Superintendent of public instruction
    State board of education (chair)
    Professional educator standards board (chair)

    Postsecondary:Council of Presidents (chair)
    Higher education coordinating board (chair)
    Independent Colleges of Washington (chair)
    State board for community and technical colleges (chair)
    Washington Association of Community and Technical Colleges (president)
    Washington Learns Higher Education Advisory Committee (chair)
    Workforce training and education coordinating board (chair)

    Government:Governor

    Other:Tribal Education Programs (chair) (representative of tribal education programs from a federally recognized tribe, appointed by the governor)

    Year started 2007 (although voluntary efforts in place before 2007)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Funding for the council's work is assumed in the current resources of the office of financial management (the governor's budget office).
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes–council staffed and supported by the office of financial management.
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The council was created to follow up on the work of Washington Learns, which completed a comprehensive review of Washington's education system, from early learning through postsecondary. The results of this review were released in November 2006. As stated in the executive order creating the council, the charge of the P-20 council is "to track progress on the Washington Learns long-term goals ... [using] existing and new measures to collect data and track changes."

    English Language Learners: The council's English language learners work group is tasked with exploring means of better serving ELL students in the state. In December 2007, the work group issued recommendations and action steps. As of February 2008, council members are asking the agency/organization they represent for commitments on action steps the agency/organization can commit to participating in. The April 2008 council meeting will include a presentation on which commitments each agency is making, and when the agency will take those action steps.

    Mathematics: The council has expressed an interest in an effort focused around mathematics. Staff supporting the council are researching which math efforts are underway in the state, with the goal of developing a compendium of current math initiatives; the compendium will allow the council to determine where on the education continuum (preschool through postsecondary) the state is effecting change. This compendium will be provided to council members for their April meeting.

    Key Indicators: A major focus of the council's work is developing education indicators, a set of 12-15 indices that will show how well the state is doing in moving students through the system, from early learning to K-12 to postsecondary. The council hopes to use these indicators as a management tool, to identify areas in which the system needs to put more effort (as opposed to allowing individual education "silos" to work independently of one another).

    It is anticipated that the list of indicators will be a continuous work in progress.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: P-20 performance goals were articulated in the Washington Learns final report and are available at http://www.p20council.wa.gov/materials/20070913/10yrgoals.pdf.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor Yes
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body None to date
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: Executive Order 07-03 and Executive Order 07-05; Laurie Dolan, Policy Director, Governor's Executive Policy Office; Heather Moss, Executive Policy Analyst, Office of Financial Management
    P-20 council Web site: http://www.p20council.wa.gov/

    West Virginia
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council 21st Century Jobs Cabinet
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership As established in executive order, the 24 voting members of the cabinet include the following:

    K-12 Education (7):
    State Superintendent of Schools
    West Virginia Center for Professional Development (CEO)
    State Board of Education (member)
    Three public school educators from different parts of state, representing elementary, middle and high school
    Representative of nonpublic primary education

    Postsecondary (5):
    Chancellor for Higher Education
    Chancellor for Community and Technical College Education
    Higher Education Policy Commission (member)
    Council for Community and Technical College Education (member)
    Representative of a private college or university

    Government (2):
    First Lady
    Secretary of the Department of Education and the Arts (a cabinet position)

    Business (4):
    West Virginia Development Office (executive director)
    Workforce West Virginia (executive director)
    A private sector leader
    West Virginia Council for Community and Economic Development (member)

    Business, Industry and Parents (5):Five individuals representing business, industry and parents of West Virginia students

    Other (1):
    Bureau for Children and Families (commissioner)

    Ex officio members (4):Senate and House education committee chairs
    House and Senate chairs of the joint commission on economic development
    Year started 2006
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-20
    Made permanent by executive order or statute Yes—executive order
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council's work is supported by the governor's office.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Curriculum Transformation: Building on the findings and outcomes of the Governor's "West Virginia Competes" Forum in fall 2005, the Jobs Cabinet sought to ensure that West Virginia students were prepared to compete in the global economy and society. A major part of this preparation depends on academically challenging coursework. Therefore, the Cabinet has endorsed and helped to facilitate West Virginia's participation in the Partnerships for 21st Century Skills. These skill areas include life and career, learning and innovation, and information, media, and technology, and they build upon core academic subjects such as reading, math, science, history, and the arts. Four additional, interdisciplinary competencies are stressed: global awareness, financial and economic literacy, civic literacy, and personal health awareness.

    Public Outreach: The 21st Century Jobs Cabinet is supporting a public communications campaign about the importance of graduating from high school and going to college. The Cabinet supports the creation of a college-going culture in West Virginia, which has a low postsecondary degree attaintment rate among adults. This outreach campaign employs a variety of strategies, including increasing student and parent awareness of financial aid opportunities, simplifying the in-state application process for postsecondary admissions, and providing more college and career counseling to students in earlier grades.

    Teacher Quality: Recognizing the fundamentally important impact teachers have on student achievement, the Cabinet is promoting teaching quality through expansion of the National Board Certification program across the state. The Cabinet has also worked on expanding the Partnerships for Teaching Quality Initiative, a statewide network of all 10 public colleges of education, colleges of arts and sciences, and K-12 schools to increase teachers' content knowledge, pre-service clinical experience, and a system of shared governance between higher education and K-12 education.

    Education/Business Partnerships: The 21st Century Jobs Cabinet is working to create and strengthen strategic partnerships between education and business. SEEDS (Student Educational and Economic Development Success) brings the best and brightest of West Virginia’s business leaders into public schools to work hand-in-hand with principals as mentors and advisors. Its objective is to transform struggling schools through the use of well-established business practices such as innovation, time management, goal setting and measurement of performance. SEEDS is a voluntary program for principals who are open to change and enthusiastic about the program’s infusion of new thinking and strategies. Principals who participate in SEEDS will receive special grant funds, provided both by the state and by private donations, and have the opportunity to work with their corporate mentor for a period of three years to design and implement innovative projects to improve the school’s overall performance and, most importantly, student achievement.

    Online Educational Portal:
     A state online educational portal is under development.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The executive order provides that the office of the governor must "determine performance measures for the Cabinet based on the following criteria: a. Providing for the maximal use of state resources throughout the P-20 enterprise; (b) Allowing longitudinal data analyses of finances, programs and students; (c) Requiring joint planning and coordination among complementary initiatives; (d) Identifying duplicative and counterproductive programs and initiatives; (e) Identifying common interagency legislative interests and strategies; (f) Identifying extant laws, regulation and practices that impede student articulation and transition; (g) Introducing system-wide best practices, including the sharing of faculty and staff positions among secondary and postsecondary institutions; and (h) Creating incentives for partnerships among institutions that may include access to innovation funding and mutual performance requirements."
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The cabinet is co-chaired by the First Lady and a representative from the business community.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body West Virginia was the second state to join the 21st Century Skills Initiative, resulting in numerous K-12 curricular reforms. The Cabinet influenced the state's decision to implement the 21st Century Skills initiatives, and provides operational support across all parts of the system for the project's implementation.

    In 2007, the 21st Century Jobs Cabinet developed and implemented the SEEDS (Student Educational and Economic Development Success) Program, a pilot program teaming a principal of a struggling school with a business leader and a master educator to help turn the low-performing school around.

    The cabinet pushed for the 2007 legislation that provides an annual salary bonus of $3,500 to teachers certified by the National Board of Professional Standards, for up to 10 years.

    The West Virginia Workforce Advisory Council was developed with the cabinet's support.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-20 council: 2006 Executive Order 7-06; Jay Cole, Education Policy Advisor, Office of Governor Joe Manchin III
    P-20 council Web site: No Web site as of April 2008

    Wisconsin
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Wisconsin PK-16 Leadership Council
    Coordinating body State department of education, state postsecondary governing board, state private higher education association, and state technical college system
    Membership The 30 members include the following:

    K-12 Education (10):State Superintendent of Public Instruction
    Cooperative Educational Service Agencies (chair)
    Wisconsin Association of School Boards (executive director)
    Wisconsin Association of School District Administrators (executive director)
    Wisconsin Education Association Council (president)
    Association of Wisconsin School Administrators (executive director)
    Wisconsin Parent Teachers Associations (executive director)
    Wisconsin AFL-CIO (president)
    AFT-Wisconsin (president)
    Wisconsin Council of Religious and Independent Schools (executive director)

    Postsecondary (7):University of Wisconsin System (president)
    Wisconsin Technical College System (president)
    Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (president)
    Educational Approval Board (executive secretary)
    Wisconsin Technical College District Boards Association (executive director)
    One faculty member each from the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin Technical College System

    Government (11):Governor or his representative

    Chairs and ranking members of the following:
    -Senate Education Committee
    -Assembly Education Committee
    -Assembly Colleges and Universities Committee
    -Senate Agriculture and Higher Education Committee
    -Assembly Education Reform Committee

    Business (2):Department of Workforce Development (secretary)
    Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce (president)

    Year started Establishment announced in 2000; first meeting held in March 2001.
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding Some Title II funds provided the seed funds for the creation of the council. The University of Wisconsin pays some of the council's operating costs; other agencies co-chairing the council (Department of Public Instruction, Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, and Wisconsin Technical College System) also provide funds and in-kind contributions (staffing, materials, facilities for meetings, etc.)
    Council meets at least once a quarter No. Council meets three times a year.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person No
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing The council does not set an action agenda. Rather than taking on its own scope of work, the council aims to add value to the work taken on by participating entities by providing input on participating entities' activities. The council focuses its input on the areas of:

    Early Childhood and Kindergarten Readiness
    Senior Year of High School/Transitions to Postsecondary

    Teacher Training and Professional Development

    Economic Development and Education
    The PK-16 Leadership Council Web site provides background papers on each of these areas of focus.

    In addition, the council strives to disseminate best practices across the state through the annual Program of Distinction award. To be eligible for an award, a program must be a collaboration across two or more sectors, have a documentable impact on student learning and/or teacher performance, help students make successful transitions, reflect "innovation, appropriate use of technology, research-based practice, and sensitivity to issues of diversity," and be replicable.

    K-12/Workforce Alignment: In 2007, the council sponsored a Business Summit with Competitive Wisconsin, Inc. (the leadership of business and organized labor in the state) for state dialogue among business leaders and educators to formulate joint goals for education and workforce development, and to shape and promote the development of new educational standards as part of the state’s participation in the America Diploma Project and Skills for the 21st Century initiative.

    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals No
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. Chairmanship of the council rotates from meeting to meeting among the heads of the four lead agencies (Department of Public Instruction, University of Wisconsin System, Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, and Wisconsin Technical College System).
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body When the legislature was considering cutting back the Youth Options dual enrollment program, the council undertook research to determine whether problems with the program were isolated to one or two districts or were statewide. Based on the findings of this research, the council successfully endorsed continuation of the program.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No, although there are numerous local/regional P-16 councils that are not directly linked to the state-level council.
    Sources P-16 council: Francine Tompkins, Director, PK-16 Initiatives, University of Wisconsin System; Janet Washbon, Policy and Government Relations, Wisconsin Technical College System; Mari McCarty, Executive Vice President, Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.wisconsin.edu/pk16/index.htm

    Wyoming
    P-16 Councils
    Name of council Wyoming P-16 Education Council
    Coordinating body None (all members of the council are viewed as equal partners).
    Membership As of April 2008, the 15 members of the council include:

    Early Learning (1):
    Wyoming Child and Family Development, Inc. (executive director)

    K-12 and Postsecondary (1):Wyoming School-University Partnership

    K-12 Education (5):
    Representation including teachers, state association of school administrators, Wyoming Education Association and state department of education.

    Postsecondary (2):
    University of Wyoming (associate vice president for academic affairs)
    Community College Commission (deputy director)

    Government (3):
    Office of the Governor (Education Policy Analyst)
    Joint Education Committee (co-chair plus representative)

    Business (3):
    Qwest Wyoming (president)
    Wyoming, Inc. (president and CEO)
    Wyoming Workforce Development Council
    Year started 2007 (although some efforts in place before 2007)
    Scope of the initiative (P-16, P-20, etc.) P-16
    Made permanent by executive order or statute No—informally established
    Advisory only or has authority Advisory only
    Source of council's funding The council is a 501(c)3. The council has been provided some start-up funding from a Wyoming Department of Education administered grant. In addition, the council is operating the Wyoming State Scholars Initiative (SSI) and because of the overlap between SSI goals and the Wyoming Hathaway Success Curriculum, the work of the council is indirectly supported by SSI funds.

    Perhaps unique to the Wyoming P-16 Education Council, one of the council's four subgroups is a "sustainability" group, whose lead member has been involved with major foundations in the state. The council's ultimate goal is to be supported by three revenue sources: (1) State government/legislative contributions; (2) Foundation support; and (3) Private business.
    Council meets at least once a quarter Yes–council meeting every other month as of April 2008.
    Council supported by at least .5 FTE staff person Yes
    List of issues/initiatives council is addressing Common Course Taxonomy: The council is supporting the development of a taxonomy that will ensure that districts statewide adhere to the same curricular content in courses with the same names. This effort aligns with the state department of education review of state K-12 standards, which must be conducted every five years. As of April 2008, the common course taxonomy is just an emerging component of the council's work.

    Rigorous High School Curriculum: One of the council's stated goals is to encourage students to complete more challenging high school courses. The state's "Hathaway Success Curriculum" sets forth courses students must complete to be eligible for a Hathaway Scholarship. The State Scholars Initiative Core curriculum is nearly identical to the Hathaway Success Curriculum. The council advocates that students complete the more rigorous combination of these two curricula (referred to on the council Web site as "Hathaway Plus"). As stated on the council Web site, "Students who take the Hathaway Plus curriculum could be eligible for federal scholarships and grants above and beyond Hathaway scholarship money."

    The council also administers the state's State Scholars Initiative grant.

    Grades 9-14 Curriculum: The council is evaluating transitions from high school to postsecondary, in particular the biology curriculum across grades 9-14. These efforts to date have impacted curriculum, in the way that many high school and two- and four-year faculty consider biology.

    P-16 Data Systems: The council is advocating for the full implementation of the Wyoming Transcripts Center. According to the council Web site, the center "will track students and their coursework from grade school through college. This data system is key to fulfilling the reporting requirements in the Hathaway legislation and will help provide better information for policymakers. For example, it will point out which schools, school districts or classes may have shortcomings. Likewise, it will highlight very successful schools that can be held up as models for lower-performing institutions. It will also give us a better handle on such things as dual enrollment, in which students are concurrently enrolled in a high school and a college course, and getting credit at both levels."

    Sustainability: The council has established a "sustainability" committee to work towards the goal of securing council funding from three sources: (1) State government/legislative contribution; (2) Foundation support; and (3) Private business.

    Communication: The council is in the process of developing a communications plan to better convey to legislators, other policymakers, educators, the business community and the general public more effectively the work and goals of the council. As of April 2008, the council aims to have the communications plan completed by August 2008.
    State has P-16/P-20 performance goals Yes
    Notes/Citation: The state has established a goal of increasing the current 44% of 9th graders who eventually pursue some form of postsecondary education.
    Council regularly chaired (or co-chaired) by the governor No. The council is chaired by the associate vice president for academic affairs, University of Wyoming.
    Policy changes brought about by P-16/P-20 coordinating body As a result of the council's efforts to align the biology curriculum across grades 9-14, the state has established an ACT math score as a requisite score for students to enter freshman Biology for Majors course.

    In addition, the state has made substantial progress toward the full implementation of the Wyoming Transcript Center (tracking students and their coursetaking K-16), owing to the involvement of council members in decisionmaking related to implementation of the data system.
    State council supports local and/or regional P-16/P-20 councils No
    Sources P-16 council: Rollin Abernethy, Wyoming P-16 Education Council, Interim Chair, and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Wyoming
    P-16 council Web site: http://www.wp-16.org/

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