Dual Enrollment: Unique Characteristics
Education Commission of the States • 700 Broadway, Suite 810 • Denver, CO 80203-3442 • 303.299.3600 • Fax: 303.296.8332 • www.ecs.org

Dual Enrollment: Unique Characteristics

This database highlights unique provisions of state dual enrollment policies that do not fit into existing data points, but are worthy of consideration by state policymakers.

Why does it matter?
  • Policy guidance that accommodates local needs, issues and objectives better meets the needs of communities.
  • More specifically addressing career courses as an avenue acknowledges that career and postsecondary pathways can reflect the highest rigor.
  • Expanding and clarifying issues related to access benefits students and families.
  • Allowing homeschool and private school students to attend early and middle college programs is of benefit to those students. However, serving students not previously served does result in additional costs to the state and district.


  • Highlights
  • At least fourteen states either require schools/districts to provide counseling or guidance as part of their dual enrollment program, or require counseling at postsecondary institutions to be available to dually enrolled students.
  • Indiana legislation creates the Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership to establish unified rigorous standards and assessment requirements and share best practices that comply with appropriate national accreditation standards for concurrent enrollment programs, and coordinate outreach and recruitment of teachers and students to participate in programs, among other duties.
  • Iowa legislation calls for the development, subject to appropriation, of an Internet-based clearinghouse to allow students to identify opportunities and understand course transferability and articulation between the K-12 and postsecondary systems in the state and between the various state postsecondary systems.
  • Oregon and Rhode Island policies identify dual enrollment as a dropout prevention/recovery mechanism.
  • Fifteen states allow homeschool and/or private school students to enroll in dual enrollment programs.


  • Note: This database does not include information about Tech Prep or early/middle college high school programs. Information about such programs is included in the ECS career/technical education and early/middle college high school databases.

    Sources for all data points are accessible through this link.

    Methodology: This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites, and will be updated as new policies and programs are enacted.

    Last updated: December 2, 2008

    This database was compiled by Jennifer Dounay, project manager, ECS High School Policy Center. For questions, additions or corrections: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.


    Unique characteristics
    Alabama Private school and homeschool students may also establish dual enrollment agreements with postsecondary institutions.

    Students in grades 10-12 who do not meet the eligibility requirement of a "B" average in high school courses may be determined eligible to participate in dual enrollment "pending demonstrated ability to benefit as documented by successful completion and placement identification on assessments approved by the department of postsecondary education" (includes ASSET, WorkKeys, CPAT). Such students are limited to pursuing career/technical and health-related courses, and must have "a 'B' average in high school courses related to the occupational/technical studies, if applicable, which the student intends to pursue at the postsecondary level and" have an overall 2.5 grade point average.
    Alaska None identified
    Arizona The community college district governing board and the local school board must enter into an agreement that addresses each party's responsibility "for payment for facilities, personnel and other costs, and the manner in which the college tuition is to be paid by or on behalf of each student...."

    Dual enrollment courses must "be at a higher level than taught by the high school[.]"

    Home schooled students are exempt from student eligibility criteria related to scores on ACT, SAT, PSAT, AIMS or college placement tests.
    Arkansas Postsecondary institutions must provide concurrent enrollment students with academic guidance counseling and the opportunity to use the on-campus library or other academic resources of the postsecondary institution.

    Legislation provides that institutions of higher education may collaborate to provide concurrent enrollment instructors with staff development, supervision and evaluation, and to provide concurrent enrollment students with academic guidance counseling and opportunities to use postsecondary campus libraries and other academic resources. While credit for a concurrent enrollment course may be awarded only by the postsecondary institution offering the course, legislation provides that nothing precludes institutions from collaborating to provide the course and award course credit.
    California None identified
    Colorado None identified
    Connecticut Dual enrollment programs in Connecticut are primarily vocational. Parochial and home school students may participate. "The college should attempt to schedule sufficient courses at times convenient for high school students (e.g., late afternoons, evenings and Saturdays)."
    Delaware No student may be denied access to dual enrollment courses because of the student's or family's inability to pay. Students must have multiple access to dual credit (i.e., AP, IB, Tech Prep) and dual enrollment courses, including courses offered at the high school, at the postsecondary institution, online, or a combination of any of the above.
    District of Columbia None identified
    Florida Florida has a common course numbering system that simplifies transfer of credits. Homeschool students are eligible to participate in dual enrollment programs, and may apply credit earned through dual enrollment to toward the completion of a home education program. Community colleges and universities may enter into dual enrollment agreements with nonpublic secondary schools.

    Districts may not refuse to enter into an agreement with a local community college if the community college has the capacity to offer dual enrollment courses.

    Statute authorizes advanced placement instruction to take place in dual enrollment courses, referred to as "joint dual enrollment and advanced placement courses."

    Each district/community college agreement must include a plan for the college to provide guidance services to participating students on the selection of dual enrollment courses. The guidance process should make maximum use of the automated advisement system for community colleges. The plan must ensure that each dual enrollment student is encouraged to identify a postsecondary education objective with which to guide the course selection.

    Legislation requires districts to annually assess the demand for dual enrollment and other advanced courses, and the local board must consider strategies and programs to meet that demand and include access to dual enrollment on the high school campus whenever possible.

    All local boards are required to develop, in collaboration with local workforce boards and postsecondary institutions approved to operate in the state, a strategic 5-year plan to address and meet local and regional workforce demands. Each plan must include provisions to have in place at least one operational career and professional academy by the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year. The strategic five-year plan must be based on opportunities for high school students to earn weighted or dual enrollment credit for higher-level career and technical courses.

    Career and professional academies, which must be offered by schools and districts, are defined as research-based programs that integrate a rigorous academic curriculum with an industry-specific curriculum aligned directly to priority workforce needs established by the regional workforce board. Legislation provides that one of the goals of such academies is to promote acceleration mechanisms, such as dual enrollment, articulated credit, or occupational completion points, so that students may earn postsecondary credit while in high school. All career courses offered in a career and professional academy must lead to industry certification or college credit linked directly to the career theme of the course. At least 50% of students in a career course must earn industry certifications or college credits during the second year the course is offered in order for the course to be offered a third year. At least 66% of students enrolled in such a course must achieve industry certifications or college credits during the third year the course is offered in order for it to be offered a fourth year and thereafter.
    Georgia Districts must provide counseling services to eligible students and their parents before students enroll in postsecondary courses. Such counseling services must provide information on available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a course. Before enrolling in a postsecondary course, the student and student's parent must sign a form stating they have received the counseling required by statute and understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in participating in the program.

    Private high school students are eligible to participate in the Accel lottery-funded dual enrollment program.
    Hawaii None identified
    Idaho Before students enroll in postsecondary courses, districts must, "to the extent possible," provide counseling so that students and parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The district must provide information including who may enroll, what institutions and sources are available under this program, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the pupil enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the pupil's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the student and parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions prior to the semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate and adequate.

    Before enrolling, the student and the student's parents must sign a form that may be obtained from a postsecondary institution stating that they have received the above information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The superintendent of public instruction must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Statute relating to the Idaho Education Network (IEN) provides legislative intent that Idaho will be a leader in the use of technology to deliver advanced high school curricula and concurrent course credit.
    Illinois None identified
    Indiana Postsecondary Enrollment Program: A district (school corporation) representative must meet with each student who intends to enroll in the program and discuss:
    • The courses in which the student may enroll
    • The postsecondary credit the student earns upon successful completion of a course
    • The consequences of the student's failure to successfully complete a course
    • The student's schedule
    • The financial obligations of the student and the school under the program
    • The responsibilities of the student, the student's parent, and the school under the program
    • Other matters concerning the program.

    Legislation directs the department of education, in consultation with the commission for higher education, to establish guidelines for the Postsecondary Enrollment Program. The guidelines must encourage participation by students at all achievement levels and in a variety of academic and vocational subjects.

    Double Up for College: A school corporation may, by agreement with a state educational institution, offer counseling concerning an early college, dual credit or dual enrollment course, including
    • Notice of the course and schedule
    • Available postsecondary credit
    • Student responsibilities
    • Tuition and other costs
    • Consequences of the failure to complete a course
    • Other matters concerning the program and opportunities presented by the program.
    Double Up for College: After June 30, 2008, a state educational institution or campus of a state educational institution that offers dual credit courses in liberal arts, professional, or career and technical disciplines must be accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships.

    2008 legislation creates the Indiana concurrent enrollment partnership (to expire July 2009). The purpose of the partnership is to:
    • Establish unified rigorous academic standards and assessment requirements and share best practices that comply with appropriate national accreditation standards for concurrent enrollment programs
    • Coordinate outreach and recruitment of Indiana students and teachers to participate in concurrent enrollment programs
    • Develop a plan to expand the dual enrollment program to every high school in Indiana
    • By December 1, 2008, develop a fiscal analysis and make recommendations to the department, the budget committee and the general assembly to make two dual enrollment courses available without tuition and fees or at reduced tuition and fees to students in grades 11 and 12 beginning with the 2010-2011 school year
    • Report annually to the department of education and the commission for higher education on early college, dual credit and dual enrollment programs
    • Offer recommendations on concurrent enrollment matters as requested by the state board and the commission for higher education.
    Iowa Students in nonpublic schools and in the state school for the deaf and the Iowa braille and sight saving school may also participate.

    Districts, in collaboration with teachers/instructors, must provide ongoing communication about course expectations, including a syllabus that describes the content, teaching strategies, performance measures, and resource materials used in the course, and academic progress to the student and student's parents. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that students and their parents receive appropriate course orientation and information, including a summary of applicable policies and procedures, the establishment of a permanent transcript, policies on dropping courses, a student handbook, information describing student responsibilities, and institutional procedures for academic credit transfer.

    The institution must also ensure that students have access to student support services, including tutoring, counseling, advising, library, writing and math labs, and computer labs, and student activities, excluding postsecondary intercollegiate athletics.

    2008 legislation directs the department to develop and make available to secondary and postsecondary students, parents, districts, accredited nonpublic schools, and eligible postsecondary institutions an Internet-based clearinghouse of information that allows students to identify participation options within the senior year plus program and transferability between educational systems, subject to an appropriation by the general assembly for this purpose. The internet-based resource must provide links to other similar resources available through various Iowa postsecondary institution systems. The internet-based resource must also identify course transferability and articulation between the secondary and postsecondary systems in Iowa and between the various Iowa postsecondary systems.

    Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Priority may be given to postsecondary students before enrolling 11th and 12th grade students in courses. However, once an 11th or 12th grade student has enrolled in a postsecondary course, the student cannot be displaced by another student for the duration of the course.
    Kansas

    Homeschooled students may also participate in dual enrollment programs.

    Students must be provided with a student guide, created as part of the "CEP" partnership between the high school and postsecondary institution, that outlines their responsibilities in the learning experience as well as a description of how courses may be transferred in the Regents system. Advising of students who desire to enroll in CEP classes must be carried out by both the high school and postsecondary institution.

    Kentucky Legislation directs the department of education, upon adequate receipt of federal funding, to (1) identify, in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education, resources at the secondary and postsecondary levels that can be directed toward advanced placement or dual enrollment instruction, and (2) identify current and future funding sources for advanced placement or dual enrollment instructional programs and the amount of funds available or anticipated from those sources.

    Every high school's school-based decision making council must establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), dual enrollment and dual credit courses that recognizes that all students have the right to participate in a rigorous and academically challenging curriculum. All students willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum must be admitted to AP, IB, dual credit and dual enrollment courses provided they have successfully completed the prerequisite coursework or have otherwise demonstrated mastery of the prerequisite content knowledge and skills as determined by measurable standards.
    Louisiana TOPS Tech Early Start: Students must be pursuing an industry-based occupational or vocational education credential that (1) is identified by the Occupuation Forecasting Conference as a credential for an occupation in top demand in Louisiana; (2) is recognized by the State Industry-Based Certification Council; and (3) is approved by the state board and board of supervisors of community and technical colleges.

    Early Start: Students may enroll in enrichment/developmental courses, provided they meet specified eligibility criteria. Students in such courses will receive postsecondary institutional credit but not degree credit.

    High school and postsecondary partners must jointly ensure access to physical facilities, access to appropriate equipment, and access to appropriate learning resources; both partners must fully inform enrolled students of the type and applicability of dual enrollment credit.

    Nonpublic and homeschool students who are at least 15, in grade 11 or 12 and who meet any other eligibility criteria set by the board of regents may participate in traditional dual enrollment programs. State funds may not be used to pay such students' tuition, but the amount of tuition charged must be the same as that charged a student in a public high school. 2008 legislation directs the board of regents, in consultation with the state student financial assistance commission, to submit a study before the start of the 2009 legislative session on the estimated cost of providing state dollars to fund the participation of nonpublic and homeschool students in dual enrollment programs, beginning with the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
    Maine None identified
    Maryland Statute mandates that the governor include in the state budget at least 80% of the amount provided for need-based programs, including this one, in the previous fiscal year's state budget. Nonpublic and homeschooled school students may participate.
    Massachusetts Nonpublic school students may participate in dual enrollment programs.
    Michigan Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Districts must provide all high school students with information on postsecondary enrollment options, including enrollment eligibility; the institutions and types of courses that are eligible for participation; the decision making process for granting academic credits; an explanation of eligible charges that will be paid by the school district and of financial arrangements for eligible charges and for paying costs not paid for by the school district; eligibility for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district; an explanation that, if the student qualifies for payment of all or part of eligible charges by the school district, the school district will pay that support directly to the postsecondary institution upon being billed by the postsecondary institution and that the student is not responsible for that payment but is responsible for payment of costs not paid for; available support services; the need to arrange an appropriate schedule; consequences of failing or not completing a postsecondary course in which the eligible student enrolls; the effect of enrolling in a postsecondary course on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements; and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by the eligible student and the student's parent.

    To the extent possible, districts must provide counseling services to an eligible students and the student's parent before the student enrolls in postsecondary courses to ensure that the student and parent are fully aware of the benefits, risks, and possible consequences of enrolling in a postsecondary course. The person providing the counseling must encourage the student and student's parent to also use available counseling services at the eligible postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate. A school district may provide such counseling in a group meeting if additional personalized counseling is also made available.

    Before enrolling in a course at a postsecondary institution, a student and the student's parent must file with the postsecondary institution a signed form stating that the student has received the aforementioned information and counseling, and that the student understands the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in the course. Upon request, the department must provide technical assistance to districts and postsecondary institutions in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    Fifth-year high school students, including students in an alternative education program, may enroll in postsecondary enrollment options or career and technical preparation program courses provided the student has not met all requirements to receive a high school diploma, and the student is not enrolled in more than two dual enrollment courses at a time or more than four dual enrollment courses during the school year.
    Minnesota Tribal school, homeschool and private school students may also participate.

    To the extent possible, the school or district must provide counseling services to students and their parents before students enroll in dual enrollment courses, to ensure that the students and their parents are fully aware of the risks and possible consequences of enrolling in postsecondary courses. The school or district must provide information on the program including who may enroll, what institutions and courses are eligible for participation, the decision-making process for granting academic credits, financial arrangements for tuition, books and materials, eligibility criteria for transportation aid, available support services, the need to arrange an appropriate schedule, consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls, the effect of enrolling in this program on the student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements, and the academic and social responsibilities that must be assumed by students and their parents. The person providing counseling must encourage students and their parents to also use available counseling services at the postsecondary institutions before the quarter or semester of enrollment to ensure that anticipated plans are appropriate.

    Statute specifies that a postsecondary institution may provide information about its programs to a secondary school or to a student or parent, but it may not advertise or otherwise recruit or solicit high school students to enroll in its programs on financial grounds. Once a student has been enrolled in a dual enrollment course, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Prior to enrolling in a course, the student and the student's parents must sign a form stating that they have received the counseling information and that they understand the responsibilities that must be assumed in enrolling in this program. The department must, upon request, provide technical assistance to a school or district in developing appropriate forms and counseling guidelines.

    The postsecondary institution must inform the student of the support services available at that institution. If the student has an individual education plan that provides general education support and accommodations, the postsecondary institution must provide the support services as described in the student's IEP and the postsecondary institution and the district must negotiate an agreement on the rate to be charged for the services. Nothing may prevent the student from enrolling while the agreement is being developed. If the parties cannot agree on the services, on application of either party, the commissioner must resolve the dispute in the same manner the commissioner fixes tuition rates under section 125A.11. The commissioner's decision is binding on both parties.

    A student in a high school 40 miles or more from the nearest eligible institution may ask the district to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit within the resident district. A student may enroll in a course offered for either secondary or postsecondary credit[.] A district must offer an accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit if one or more students requests such a course. The district may decide which course to offer, how to offer the course, and whether to offer one or more courses. The district must offer at least one such course in the next academic period and must continue to offer at least one accelerated or advanced academic course for postsecondary credit in later academic periods.
    Mississippi All programs: Home-schooled students may also participate.

    For partnerships among local districts, the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) and the Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges (SBCJC): The chief academic officers of the board of trustees of state institutions of higher learning and of the state board for community and junior colleges must collaboratively develop a template for individual community and junior colleges and institutions of higher learning for consistent implementation of the dual enrollment program throughout the state.
    Missouri None identified
    Montana None identified
    Nebraska The Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, direct districts and institutions to "work together to ensure broad access to dual enrollment courses for all students, irrespective of the students’ financial resources. Postsecondary education institutions are encouraged to offer tuition remissions or find other means of support for eligible students qualifying for free or reduced lunches or otherwise demonstrating financial need.
    "School districts that receive state aid related in part to significant numbers of students challenged by poverty or English language limitations should consider using such aid or finding other means of support to fund the tuition expenses of eligible students who would not otherwise be able to enroll in dual enrollment courses."

    Department of education regulations governing nonpublic schools indicate that nonpublic high schools may offer up to 100 of the minimum required 200 instructional units "through contractual or cooperative arrangements with other schools, educational service units, and/or postsecondary institutions" as long as "the courses are taught by properly certificated teachers and are made available to all eligible students."
    Nevada Charter school students are expressly identified as being able to participate in dual enrollment programs. Homeschool students may enroll subject to case-by-case approvals by institution officials.
    New Hampshire None identified
    New Jersey None identified
    New Mexico Private school, homeschool and tribal school students may participate in dual credit courses, provided they pay the full cost of the college courses.

    Postsecondary and district partners in dual credit agreements must collaborate to provide information and orientation to the student and parent on the responsibilities of dual credit enrollment, including academic rigor, time commitments, and behavioral expectations associated with taking college courses and the importance of satisfactorily completing the postsecondary institution credits attempted in order for dual credit to be awarded. Postsecondary and district partners must also inform students of course requirement information, including course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements, performance standards, and other related course information.

    District partners must provide appropriate accommodations and services for special education students while the students are enrolled in dual credit classes, including academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services for eligible students across educational activities and settings (e.g. equipping school computers with screen-reading, voice recognition or other adaptive hardware or software and providing note-takers, recording devices, or sign language interpreters, or other adaptation as required by law). Districts must also inform students in need of accommodations or other arrangements of the need to speak directly with the disabilities coordinator at the postsecondary institution.

    High school students must be allowed use of the postsecondary institution library, course-related labs and other instructional facilities, use of the postsecondary institution programs and services such as counseling, tutoring, advising, and special services for the students with disabilities, and access to postsecondary institution personnel and resources as required.
    New York None identified
    North Carolina Huskins Bill and Concurrent Enrollment students may not displace adults but may be admitted any term on a space-available basis to any curriculum course 100 level and above or any continuing education course. Once admitted, they must be treated the same as all other students.

    Huskins: Homeschool students may participate. However, homeschools must participate via their local school administrative unit.

    Special needs students must meet the disability eligibility standards for the college. The college must determine with the school or district "what accommodations are needed, while maintaining the integrity of the course, to provide the student proper access to the course. The college and LSAU[district]/school will collaborate to determine who will provide necessary services."
    North Dakota Generally, dual-credit courses will be offered at participating high schools within the host institution's primary geographic service region or in the case of UND and NDSU that have state-wide missions, in those counties immediately adjacent to the host institution."
    Ohio Students in grades 8-11 and their parents must receive counseling before participating in Post-Secondary Enrollment Options, to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the possible risks and consequences of participation. Counseling information must include:
    • Program eligibility
    • The process for granting academic credits
    • Financial arrangements for tuition, books, materials and fees
    • Criteria for any transportation aid
    • Available support services
    • Scheduling
    • The consequences of failing or not completing a course in which the student enrolls and the effect of the grade attained in the course being included in the student's grade point average
    • The effect of program participation on the student's ability to complete the district's or school's graduation requirements
    • The academic and social responsibilities of students and parents under the program
    • Information about and encouragement to use the counseling services of the college in which the student intends to enroll. The student and student's parent must sign a form indicating they have received the counseling information and that they understand the responsibilities they must assume in the program.

    A college must give priority to its other students regarding enrollment in courses. However, once a student has been accepted in a course as a participant, the institution may not displace the participant for another student.

    Nonpublic school students may also participate in Postsecondary Enrollment Options. Participating nonpublic schools must annually provide all students in grades 8-11 with information about Postsecondary Enrollment Options before the first day of March. The chief administrator of any nonpublic school notifying the department of education that students of the school will participate in the program must provide counseling to students in grades 8-11 and their parents before the students participate in the program to ensure that students and parents are fully aware of the possible risks and consequences of participation. Such counseling must include explaining the fact that funding may be limited and that not all students who wish to participate may be able to do so.

    Oklahoma Homeschool students and students from unaccredited high schools may concurrently enroll if they are at least 16 and meet the ACT/SAT score threshold (ACT/SAT threshold for 16-year-old students from homeschools or unaccredited high schools are substantially higher than those for 17-year-old students from homeschools or unaccredited high schools). The University of Oklahoma (OU) and Oklahoma State University may set higher admission requirements for such students age 17 or older. OU is authorized to require a minimum class rank or grade point average in addition to the ACT/SAT score.

    In addition, colleges "should provide appropriate academic advising prior to and continuing throughout the student's enrollment."
    Oregon Districts must establish a process to identify students who have dropped out and make it a priority to provide these dropouts with information about the Expanded Options Program. Districts must send information about the program to the last known address of the student's family.

    Annual notification about the Expanded Options Program must include information about:
    • Financial arrangements for tuition, textbooks, equipment and materials
    • Available transportation services
    • The effect of enrolling in the Expanded Options Program on the eligible student's ability to complete the required high school graduation requirements
    • The consequences of failing or not completing an eligible postsecondary course
    • The requirement that participation in the Expanded Options Program is contingent on acceptance by an eligible post-secondary institution
    • School district timelines affecting student eligibility and duplicate course determinations.

    The district of a student who wishes to participate in the Expanded Options Program must review with the student and the student's parent the student's current status toward meeting all state and school district graduation requirements and the applicability of the proposed eligible postsecondary course with respect to fulfilling the student's remaining graduation requirements. An eligible student who intends to participate in the Expanded Options Program must develop an educational learning plan in cooperation with an advisory support team. The plan may include the student's short-term and long-term learning goals and proposed activities, and the relationship of the eligible postsecondary courses proposed under the Expanded Options Program and the student's learning goals. An advisory support team may include the student, the student's parent and a teacher or a counselor. If a postsecondary institution accepts a student for participation in Expanded Options, the institution must provide academic advising to the student as appropriate.

    Legislation specifies that the student's resident district must provide any required special education services to a student participating in the Expanded Options program. A participating postsecondary institution that intends to provide special education services to a student in the Expanded Options program must enter into a contract with the student's resident district; this contract must include components set forth in statute.

    Legislation authorizes a district to seek a department waiver from the Expanded Options Program requirements. The department must grant the waiver if compliance with statutory requirements would adversely impact the finances of the school district, or if offers dual credit technical preparation programs, such as two-plus-two programs, advanced placement or International Baccalaureate programs and other accelerated college credit programs. There is no limit to the number of times a district may be granted a waiver.

    A public school may participate in the Expanded Options Program by amending its charter.

    Pennsylvania Students in charter, nonpublic/private or homeschool programs may participate in concurrent enrollment programs. Printed promotional materials that the department of education provides school districts and area vocational-technical schools for dissemination must be made available, on request, to any charter, nonpublic/private or home education program. The total amount of state grant funds to support charter, nonpublic/private, or homeschool programs must equal up to 6% of the total amount of funds appropriated.

    Upon local request, the department must provide technical assistance to a district or area vocational-technical school in developing a concurrent enrollment program.

    For a district or area vocational-technical school to receive a concurrent enrollment grant, a concurrent enrollment committee must be formed. Four members must include a parent of a high school student, a teacher, an administrator, and the chair of the local board. At least two members must be appointed by the postsecondary institution. The concurrent enrollment committee must develop a concurrent enrollment agreement to submit for state approval, present the agreement to the local board for approval, meet at least quarterly to review the program, recommend any changes to the local board, and develop criteria for students who do not meet certain enrollment criteria to participate in the program.
    Rhode Island Legislation directs the department of elementary and secondary education to develop targeted dropout prevention interventions "or identify appropriate existing methods for school districts" in which the dropout rate, as calculated by the department, exceeds 15%. These interventions may include "[a]lternative programs designed to reengage dropouts including dual enrollment courses at the community college level" and offering full course fee waivers for free- and reduced-lunch students enrolled in dual credit courses.
    South Carolina Institutions must "cooperate with each other in providing dual enrollment courses in a particular geographic area." Policy also specifies, "Students enrolled in dual enrollment courses must be guaranteed convenient geograhic and electronic access to student and academic support comparable to what is accorded on-campus students, including access to library resources. Students in dual enrollment courses also must have reasonable access to the course instructor outside regular classroom hours either in person, via phone, or electronically."

    "For purposes of assuring comparability of dual enrollment offerings with other institutional offerings, academic departments must provide" dual enrollment instructors "with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty liaison."
    South Dakota None identified
    Tennessee One of the eligibility criteria for a General Assembly Merit Scholarship is that while in high school, a student enrolled in at least four courses (12 semester hours) at an eligible postsecondary institution.

    During the 2008-2009 school year, a one-year pilot program funded by lottery proceeds is providing laptops to students in dual enrollment courses that require a computer (either online courses or courses in which a computer is a necessary piece of equipment). One hundred students in each grand division of the state will receive a laptop. The higher education commission, in consultation with the department of education, must provide an evaluation of the pilot to the house and senate education committees by September 2009.
    Texas State policy makes clear that dual credit students must be eligible to use the same or comparable support services that traditional college students use. The college is responsible for ensuring timely and efficient access to support services (academic advising and counseling), learning materials (library resources), and to other benefits for which dual credit students may be eligible.

    Statute directs the commissioner of education to develop a gold performance rating system based on enhanced performance. One of the performance standards on which high schools' gold performance rating should be based on include the percentage of students who successfully complete dual credit courses.

    Statute provides a program for districts with one or more high schools that had at least 26 students in the graduating class and that, for any two consecutive years during the last five years, were among the lowest 10% of high schools in the percentage of students graduating high school and enrolling in a postsecondary institution the following school year. Such districts must enter into an agreement with the closest public institution of higher education (or another institution) to develop a plan to increase the number of graduating seniors who enroll in an institution of higher education the year after graduation. The plan must establish an accurate method of measuring progress that may include the percentage of district students and the percentage of students attending the targeted district high school(s) participating in dual enrollment programs.

    A pilot program created by 2005 legislation provides for a pilot program to waive the tuition and fees of a student concurrently enrolled in high school and a public junior college, and who is eligible for free or reduced lunch. Such students are entitled to free textbooks. Legislation directs the coordinating board to select for participation in the pilot five colleges in various geographic regions of the state that vary significantly in the number of students enrolled. Participating districts must anually report to the Texas Education Agency on enrollment in such dual credit courses.
    Utah Statute directs two public postsecondary institutions (Snow College in Richfield and the College of Eastern Utah) to work with local districts to develop "an agressive concurrent enrollment program."

    Statute authorizes the state board of education and the board of regents to develop a concurrent enrollment program for Mandarin Chinese, to be taught over the state's two-way interactive video and audio system, EDNET.
    Vermont VSC Dual Enrollment Program: Any student who completes the "Introduction to College Studies" course receives a voucher for up to two college courses, which may be used at any of the five Vermont State Colleges or at other participating institutions in the state. Tuition free courses are available thanks to GEAR UP and state funds allocated through the Next Generation Initiative fund.
    Virginia The superintendent of public instruction must develop and the board of education must approve criteria for determining and recognizing performance in schools and districts. In recognizing district-level performance, the board must include consideration of special district accomplishments, such as numbers of students in dual enrollment, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses. The Virginia Index of Performance (VIP) has been developed by the Board of Education as an incentive program to recognize school accountability. Included among the performance criteria is "Increase the percentage of high school students taking Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and dual enrollment courses."

    For partnerships between high schools and community colleges: The community college must identify a dual enrollment coordinator to serve as a liaison to the high school. The coordinator must make information sessions available to students and parents, and facilitate meetings between high school and postsecondary stakeholders to address logistics.
    Washington Homeschool and private school students may participate.

    Once a student has enrolled in a postsecondary course or program, the student may not be displaced by another student.

    Districts in Washington and community colleges in Idaho and Oregon may enter into agreements to allow 11th and 12th grade students to earn high school and postsecondary credit. Such agreements must adhere to RCW 28A.600.310 through .360 and 28A.600.380 through .400. A district agreement may allow the community college to accept an amount less than the statewide uniform rate set in 28A.600.310(2) if the community college does not charge students tuition and fees. To the extent feasible, such agreements must permit students to attend the community college without paying tuition or fees. Agreements may not permit community colleges to charge nonresident tuition and fee rates. Agreements must ensure that students may enroll only in courses transferable to the Washington two-year, tribal and select four-year institutions from which students in traditional dual enrollment programs would earn postsecondary credits.

    Legislation enacted in 2007 directs the superintendent of public instruction to establish skill centers of excellence in key economic sectors of regional significance. Once the skill centers are established, the superintendent must seek funding for a running start for career and technical education grant program to develop and implement career and technical programs targeted to regionally determined high-demand occupations. Grant recipients should be partnerships of skill centers of excellence, community college centers of excellence, tech-prep programs, industry advisory committees, area workforce development councils, and skill panels in the related industry.
    West Virginia In determining criteria for "exemplary" school and district accreditation status, the state board awards districts "bonus points" for dual credit completers.

    In addition, state standards for evaluating schools must include indicators of exemplary student, school and school system performance and progress. One such indicator is the percentage of students successfully completing dual credit, Advanced Placement and honors courses.

    Performance indicators adopted by the state council for community and technical college education include enrollment in early admission and dual credit courses delivered by community and technical colleges for high school students.
    Wisconsin

    A district must inform a student and the student's parent if the student's timetable for graduation may be negatively affected if the student participates in the Youth Options program.

    A district is not required to pay for courses offered by the district that are 80% comparable to the courses requested.

    Wyoming None identified
    Puerto Rico No information located

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