Dual Enrollment: Instructor and Course Quality Component
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Dual Enrollment: Instructor and Course Quality Component

State policies generally allow dual enrollment courses to be taught by postsecondary faculty, high school teachers, or through virtual means. This database indicates procedures to ensure the quality and rigor of dual enrollment courses, especially for courses offered by high school instructors on the high school campus. This database also includes any state policies specific to postsecondary faculty leading a dual enrollment course.

This database does not include broader efforts to evaluate dual enrollment programs, in terms of student access, subsequent student outcomes, etc. For state policies on program evaluation, please see the "Program evaluation component" database.

Why does it matter?
  • Teachers of postsecondary courses require a deeper level of content knowledge. Some type of measures to validate that deeper knowledge are key to ensuring program quality.
Highlights
  • Thirty-seven states have embedded instructor/course quality components into state policy. Such policies may require high school instructors teaching dual enrollment courses to meet additional criteria, such as supplemental training or appointment as adjunct faculty at the partner postsecondary institution, or require course syllabi or other materials to undergo review by postsecondary faculty, or put other measures in place to ensure the content of dual enrollment courses is equivalent to that of courses taught to traditional postsecondary students. State policy in a few states addresses instructor quality for postsecondary faculty.
  • Eight states and the District of Columbia do not specify instructor/course quality components in state policy. Instructor qualifications and course quality may be set in institutional/system policy, or in agreements between school districts and postsecondary institutions/systems.
  • In 5 states, instructor/course quality is addressed in state policy for one statewide dual enrollment avenue, but not another.
Note: This database does not include information about Tech Prep or early/middle college high school programs. Information about such programs is included in the ECS career/technical education and early/middle college high school databases.

Methodology: This information was collected from state statutes, rules and regulations, and state education agency Web sites. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: December 2013

This database was compiled by Jennifer Dounay Zinth: 303.299.3689 or jdounay@ecs.org.

Instructor and course quality component
Alabama Yes. A high school teacher teaching a dual enrollment course through a community college must be designated an adjunct faculty member of the college and must meet the state board and other accrediting agencies' credentialing requirements. Faculty must be under the college's control and supervision, and the college must provide for faculty orientation, supervision and evaluation.

For courses offered through four-year institutions, instructor and course quality provisions are determined at the institutional level.
Alaska Not set in state policy
Arizona Yes. An agreement or contract between a community college district and a school district or charter school must clearly specify the quality of the instruction that will be provided. Courses must be previously evaluated and approved through the community college district's curriculum approval process, be at a higher level than taught by the high school, and be transferable to a university or applicable to an established community college occupational degree or certificate program. College approved textbooks, syllabuses, course outlines and grading standards applicable to courses if taught at the community college must apply to these courses. The CEO of each community college must establish an advisory committee of full-time faculty to assist in course selection and implementation in the high schools, and to review and report at least annually to the CEO whether the course goals and standards are understood, course guidelines are followed, and same standards of expectation and assessment are applied to courses as though they were offered at the community college. The advisory committee must meet at least three times each academic year.
Each faculty member must meet requirements established by the governing board. The CEO of each community college district must establish an advisory committee of full-time faculty to assist in the selection, orientation, ongoing professional development and evaluation of faculty teaching college courses in conjunction with high schools. The advisory committee must meet at least twice each academic year.
Arkansas Yes. Instructors of endorsed concurrent enrollment courses must have at least a master's degree that includes a minimum of 18 graduate hours of coursework in the subject area of the course. The instructor's credentials must be approved by the academic unit or chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution offering the course. The instructor must also have the relevant credentials and experience necessary to teach from the syllabus approved by the postsecondary institution. For the purpose of teaching a concurrent course under this policy, an individual under contract with the school district as a teacher will not be considered an adjunct faculty member of the college/university.

Concurrent enrollment courses must be approved through the postsecondary institution's normal process and listed in the postsecondary institution's catalog. The course content and instruction must meet the same standards and adopt the same learning outcomes and assignments as those developed for a course taught on the institution’s campus, including the administration of any departmental exams applicable to the course, use of substantially the same book and syllabus as used at the college level, and the same course grading standards. If departmental exams are used in college/university campus courses, then those course exams must be used at the high school site. The institution must provide the course instructor with staff development, supervision, and evaluation. Institutions may collaborate to provide this staff development, supervision, and evaluation.

Institutions of higher education must demonstrate “ownership” of any course offered for concurrent credit for which students are reported for funding purposes. Ownership of courses means that the college/university must (1) provide the instructors with appropriate training and orientation in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and administrative requirements after approval of the instructors to teach the college/university courses; and (2) ensure that instructors receive continuing collegial interaction with college faculty through professional development, required seminars, and site visits. These interactions must address topics such as course content, course delivery, student learning assessment, in-class evaluation, and professional development in the field of study.

Concurrent program requirements and guidelines required for course instruction must be provided by the college/university to the school district and concurrent instructors.

Any college or university that participates in a concurrent enrollment program must be accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships or be authorized by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board no later than August 1, 2015. An institution offering concurrent enrollment only on the college/university campus has satisfied the requirements for initial authorization for Concurrent Enrollment Program participation.

Postsecondary faculty who travel to the high school or secondary center to teach concurrent courses (and/or faculty and staff who have direct contact with the high school student) must have a criminal background check and complete the child maltreatment training course as required of public school teachers.

For a CTE course offered in a secondary area technical center: Technical instructors teaching at a secondary area technical center must have a minimum of an associate degree within the area of instruction and must have completed fingerprint and background checks and meet all college accrediting standards for instructors. Secondary area technical centers should submit documentation of these records to the Office of Workforce Training, ADWE. Centers will annually submit a list of instructors providing concurrent credit and meeting the above requirements will be given an annual waiver from teacher licensure requirements. Those instructors not meeting these requirements or instructors teaching non-concurrent credit classes must hold an Arkansas teacher permit.
California Not set in state policy
Colorado Yes. The postsecondary institution is responsible for course content, placement of the student in the course, and the quality of instruction.

A postsecondary instructor may not be required to hold a teacher’s license.
Connecticut Yes, for online courses. Students may apply postsecondary online courses toward high school graduation requirements if the local or regional board of education has adopted a policy on awarding of graduation credit for online coursework. Local policies must ensure that, if a course is offered by an accredited postsecondary institution, (1) the workload required by the online course is equivalent to that of a similar course taught in a traditional classroom setting, (2) the content is rigorous and aligned with state board-approved curriculum guidelines, where appropriate, (3) the course engages students and has interactive components, including required interactions between students and their teachers, participation in on-line demonstrations, discussion boards or virtual labs, and (4) the program of instruction is planned, ongoing and systematic.
Delaware Yes. The articulation agreement between the district, school, or charter school and institution must specify the course syllabus, the expected course competencies, grading policy, attendance policy, and conditions for awarding dual credit. All dual credit courses must be taught by an approved Dual Credit Instructor. A dual enrollment instructor must meet the requirements of a faculty member or adjunct faculty member at the institution.

All dual credit courses must incorporate any applicable state content standards.
District of Columbia Not set in state policy
Florida Yes. Each faculty member teaching a dual enrollment course must:
  • Meet the qualifications required by the entity accrediting the postsecondary institution offering the course, including meeting the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges' Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement, 2010 Edition, section 3.7.1, for postsecondary instructors in the course and discipline. The qualifications apply to all faculty members regardless of the location of instruction. The postsecondary institution offering the course must require compliance with these qualifications.
  • Provide the institution offering the dual enrollment course a copy of his/her postsecondary transcript.
  • Provide a copy of the current syllabus for each course taught to the discipline chair or department chair of the postsecondary institution before the start of each term. The content of each syllabus must meet the same standards required for all college-level courses offered by that postsecondary institution. All full-time and adjunct faculty teaching dual enrollment courses shall file a copy of their current course syllabus with the college's discipline chair or department chair prior to the start of each term.
  • Adhere to the professional rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the postsecondary institution's faculty or adjunct faculty handbook. Any exceptions must be included in the dual enrollment articulation agreement.
  • Adhere to the rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the postsecondary institution's student handbook, including those related to add/drop and withdrawal policies, student code of conduct, grading policies, and critical dates. Any exceptions must be noted in the dual enrollment articulation agreement.
In addition, each president (or designee) of an institution offering a dual enrollment course must:
  • Provide a copy of the institution's current faculty or adjunct faculty handbook to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course.
  • Provide to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course a copy of the institution's current student handbook, which may include, but is not limited to, information on registration policies, the student code of conduct, grading policies, and critical dates.
  • Designate an individual or individuals to observe all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course, regardless of the location of instruction.
  • Use the same criteria to evaluate faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course as the criteria used to evaluate all other faculty members.
  • Provide course plans and objectives to all faculty members teaching a dual enrollment course.
The postsecondary institution must provide all adjunct faculty teaching dual enrollment courses with a full-time faculty contact or liaison in the same discipline.

Dual enrollment courses taught at the high school must meet the same competencies required for courses taught on the postsecondary institution campus. To ensure equivalent rigor, the postsecondary institution must in a timely manner provide the faculty member teaching the course a comprehensive, cumulative end-of-course assessment or a series of assessments of all expected learning outcomes in accordance with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges' Principles of Accreditation: Foundations for Quality Enhancement, 2010 Edition, sections 2.7.4 and 3.5.1. Completed, scored assessments must be returned to the postsecondary institution and held for 1 year. Textbooks and instructional materials must be the same as or comparable to those used in courses offered by the postsecondary institution with the same course prefix and number. The postsecondary institution must advise the school district of instructional materials requirements as soon as that information becomes available but no later than one term before a course is offered.

Course requirements, i.e., tests, papers, or other assignments, for dual enrollment students must be at the same level of rigor or depth as those for non-dual enrollment postsecondary students. All faculty members teaching dual enrollment courses must observe the procedures and deadlines of the postsecondary institution for the submission of grades. A postsecondary institution must advise each faculty member teaching a dual enrollment course of the institution's grading guidelines before the faculty member begins teaching the course.

Dual enrollment courses taught on a high school campus may not be combined with any non-college credit high school course.

The comprehensive dual enrollment articulation agreement between a school district and a Florida College System institution must identify exceptions, if any, to the professional rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the faculty or adjunct faculty handbook for the postsecondary institution, and exceptions, if any, to the rules, guidelines, and expectations stated in the student handbook of the postsecondary institution that apply to faculty members.
Georgia Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment: Yes. The department, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and the State Board of the Technical College System of Georgia must jointly establish policies to ensure dual credit courses reflect college-level work. Such policies must include establishing the same content standards, requirements for faculty, course syllabi, and end-of-course exams for dual credit academic and career, technical, and agricultural education courses, whether taught to high school or college students.

Move on When Ready: Courses are taken at postsecondary institution or online.
Hawaii Not applicable—courses are taken only at colleges.
Idaho Yes. Part of the definition of “dual credit” is that postsecondary institutions work closely with high schools to deliver college courses that are identical to those offered on the college campus.

Dual credit courses are catalogued courses and approved through the postsecondary institution’s regular course approval process. Courses have the same departmental designation, number, title, and credits, and adhere to the same course description and course content as the postsecondary course. Dual credit courses reflect the pedagogical, theoretical and philosophical orientation of the sponsoring faculty and/or academic department at the postsecondary institution.

Dual credit instructors meet the academic requirements for faculty and instructors teaching in postsecondary, or provisions are made to ensure instructors are capable of providing quality college-level instruction through ongoing support and professional development. Teacher qualifications are reviewed, professional development is provided as needed, course content and assessment expectations are reviewed, faculty assessment is discussed, etc.

The postsecondary institution provides high school instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, student assessment criteria, course philosophy, and dual credit administrative requirements before certifying the instructors to teach the college/university’s courses. Instructors teaching dual credit courses are part of a continuing collegial interaction through professional development, such as seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institutions’ faculty and dual credit administration. This interaction addresses issues such as course content, course delivery, assessment, evaluation, and professional development in the field of study. High school faculty is evaluated by using the same classroom performance standards and processes used to evaluate college faculty.

Dual credit students are held to the same course content standards and standards of achievement as those expected of students in postsecondary courses. Every course offered through a dual credit program is annually reviewed by postsecondary faculty from that discipline and dual credit teachers/staff to assure that grading standards meet those in on-campus sections. Dual credit students are assessed using the same methods (e.g. papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs, etc.) as their on-campus counterparts.
Illinois Yes. Dual credit instructors teaching credit-bearing college-level courses must meet the same academic credential requirements as faculty teaching on campus. Instructors for community college courses taught in high schools must be selected, employed and evaluated by the community college. They must be selected from full-time faculty and/or from adjunct faculty with appropriate credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies at the college level. Instructors in career and technical education courses must possess the credentials and demonstrated teaching competencies appropriate to the field of instruction. Course content and learning outcomes must be the same as those for credit-bearing college courses, and learning outcomes must be appropriately measured. Institutions must provide high school instructors with an orientation in course curriculum, assessment methods, and administrative requirements before high school instructors are permitted to teach dual credit courses. Dual credit instructors must be given the opportunity to participate in all activities available to other adjunct faculty, including professional development, seminars, site visits, and internal communication, provided that such opportunities do not interfere with an instructor's regular teaching duties. Every dual credit course must be reviewed annually by faculty through the appropriate department to ensure consistency with campus courses. Dual credit students must be assessed using methods consistent with students in traditional credit-bearing college courses.

For community college courses offered at a high school: All state laws, ICCB regulations, accreditation standards specified by the North Central Association, and local college policies that apply to courses, instructional procedures and academic standards at the college apply to college-level courses offered by the college on campus, at off-campus sites, and at secondary schools. These policies, regulations, instructional procedures and academic standards apply to students, faculty and staff associated with these courses.
Indiana Yes, for Postsecondary Enrollment Program. The institution must ensure that course content and rigor is adequate to warrant providing credit to a student as if the student took the course as a student at the eligible institution, including determining prerequisites, if any, for enrollment in a dual credit course and standards for assessment. The institution must set the criteria for a faculty member or other instructor teaching the course with the institution or school corporation, depending on whether the course is taught by postsecondary faculty or high school instructor.

In addition, a state educational institution or campus thereof that offers concurrent college courses must be either accredited by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, or approved by the commission for higher education.
Iowa All Senior Year Plus Programs: Yes. Course instructors must meet the standards and requirements that other full-time instructors in the academic department are required to meet and that are approved by the appropriate postsecondary administration. Community colleges must report instructor degree, certifications, and other qualifications to meet the minimum hiring standards.

District-to-Community College Sharing or Concurrent Enrollment: Yes. For a district to be eligible for supplemental weighting for participating students, a class must be included in the community college catalog or an amendment or addendum to the catalog, and open to all registered community college students, not just high school students. (The class may be offered in a high school attendance center.) The course instructor must be employed or contracted by a community college. The course must be taught using the community college course syllabus, and taught in such a manner as to result in student work and student assessment that meet college-level expectations.

Project Lead the Way: Yes, A school district offering a Project Lead the Way program must offer the curriculum developed by the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program. An instructor must have successfully completed the training required by and meet the minimum requirements of the national organization that administers the Project Lead the Way program.
Kansas Yes. If a district and postsecondary institution enter into a Concurrent Enrollment Partnership (CEP) for high school teachers to teach college credit classes during the school day, the CEP agreement must include necessary directions for curriculum, faculty, students, assessment, professional development activities and a listing of principles for assuring quality in programming. CEP arrangements must include collaborative faculty development programming such as pedagogy, instructional design, course management, instructional delivery skill improvement, curricular reform initiatives, and student success assessment strategies.

Courses must have been approved through the institution’s curriculum approval process. The course content, goals, and objectives must be the same as those for the same courses. Materials such as textbooks used must be comparable to those used in the same course throughout the institution. Procedures for selection of textbooks and related material by faculty who teach concurrently enrolled students must follow adopted postsecondary institutional policies. If the course is an approved competency-based course, the competencies must be the same as those for courses not taught to concurrently enrolled students.

Instructors must have either: (1) a master’s degree with 18 credit hours in the assigned course content; or (2) a bachelor’s degree, with at least 24 credit hours in the assigned course content. Both academic and CTE instructors must use the same final examination as given in the same course taught at the institution, and apply the same scoring rubric for the assigned course as used in the on-campus class. Institutions may set higher standards. Teaching evaluations must be conducted. The postsecondary institution must provide instructors with orientation and ongoing professional development.

Faculty teaching college-level tiered technical courses through a CEP must either meet the academic standards above or possess a valid/current industry-recognized credential and a minimum of 4,000 hours of work experience in the specific technical field.

Before approving instructors to teach CEP courses, the postsecondary institution must provide high school instructors with orientation and training in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and CEP administrative requirements. Each CEP must include an implementation plan for ensuring that instructors teaching concurrently enrolled students are part of a continuing collegial interaction through professional development, seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institution’s faculty and administration of the partnership.

Courses offered through a CEP must be reviewed annually by faculty in the discipline at the postsecondary partner to assure that grading standards (i.e., papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs), course management, instructional delivery and content meet or exceed those in regular on-campus sections.

Kentucky Yes. Statute directs the Council on Postsecondary Education, in conjunction with the Kentucky Board of Education and the Education Professional Standards Board, to develop guidelines for content knowledge and teacher training in dual enrollment and dual credit programs offered in Kentucky.

Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) and CPE Dual Credit: KCTCS colleges and postsecondary institutions are responsible for the academic integrity of the courses. Each college/institution must ensure the quality (equivalency of student learning outcomes for four-year institutions), consistency, and rigor of courses accepted for dual credit. Coursework must be relevant to a credential offered at the college/institution, and include the same course competencies and result in the same learning outcomes as the course taught at the college/institution.

When KCTCS or a public four-year institution seeks to change the learning outcomes for any dual credit program or course, KCTCS must notify the department of education when the KCTCS curriculum approval/course revision process is initiated (or public postsecondary institution must notify the schools involved). If it is determined that the proposed change will have an adverse effect on the award of college credit, KCTCS will identify appropriate standards for content, quality, and rigor pursuant to the requirements of SACS-COC for the program/course revision. The department of education must ensure that courses approved for dual credit incorporate any changes that occur in the same courses at KCTCS.

KCTCS: Students receive a syllabus by the first or second day of the course. The syllabus includes course requirement information, including the official description, course prerequisites, course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements/performance standards, and other related course information, as well as criteria to be used in evaluating the student’s performance. The KCTCS grading policy applies to dual credit courses.

CPE: Dual credit courses and the instructors of those courses comply with all appropriate Southern Association of Colleges and Schools - Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC) criteria. Dual credit courses must be taught by postsecondary faculty or secondary school teachers approved by the postsecondary institution as having appropriate credentials established by the SACS-COC Guidelines for Faculty Credentials and university policy. Secondary school faculty must demonstrate compliance with teaching credentials and qualifications. The postsecondary institution grading policy applies to dual credit courses. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that each secondary school teacher teaching dual credit courses develops and uses a course syllabus with appropriate learning outcomes and content for each course. Secondary schools are responsible for providing detailed information to students in writing (i.e., a syllabus) consistent with the public postsecondary institution policy. This information shall include the nature of the course and the expectations and requirements that correspond to its official catalog description. Course requirement information must include course prerequisites, course content, grading policy, attendance requirements, course completion requirements, performance standards, information on adding and dropping courses, and other related course information.

CPE postsecondary institutions are responsible for conducting faculty evaluations for dual credit teachers in a manner consistent with the postsecondary institution’s guidelines for evaluation of adjunct faculty and student evaluation of faculty (i.e., conducting evaluations in a manner consistent with SACS-COC standards).
Louisiana Dual Enrollment: Yes. Course content may not be any less than that which is required of a similar course open to postsecondary students only. The secondary and postsecondary institutions must agree upon faculty appointment. Postsecondary institutions must ensure that secondary faculty possess necessary qualifications and meet appropriate regional and program accreditation requirements for instruction. Secondary institutions must also ensure that postsecondary faculty possess necessary qualifications and meet appropriate accreditation requirements for instruction.

In addition, providers offering dual enrollment courses through the Louisiana Course Choice Program must ensure that courses meet the standards and grade-level expectations of the high school course for which the student is receiving credit and meet the standards for college credit as established by the board of regents.

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Yes. The Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance (LOSFA) must conduct audits of participating Louisiana public postsecondary institutions to ensure compliance with program requirements.
Maine General program: Not set in state policy

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Yes. A program must meet national concurrent enrollment standards.
Maryland Not set in state policy. All dual enrollment courses are in state-approved academic programs in degree-granting institutions.
Massachusetts Not set in state policy
Michigan Not set in state policy
Minnesota Yes. Postsecondary institutions are encouraged to apply for accreditation by the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships. Districts may use the ≥2% of basic revenue they are required to reserve for staff development in order to pay for coursework and training leading to certification as a college in the schools or concurrent enrollment teacher. In order to receive a grant, the teacher must be enrolled in a program that includes coursework and training focused on teaching a core subject.
Mississippi Yes. Course prerequisites must be the same for dual enrolled students as for regularly enrolled students at that university or community or junior college. All dual credit courses must meet the standards established at the postsecondary level. Dual credit memorandum of understandings must be established between each postsecondary institution and the school district implementing a dual credit program.

All dual credit academic instructors must have a master's degree with a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in their field of expertise. Dual credit career and technical education instructors must meet the requirements set forth by the State Board for Community and Junior Colleges in the qualifications manual for postsecondary Career and Technical personnel. A high school teacher must be approved as an instructor by the collaborating college or university. An instructor employed by the college or university must be approved by the collaborating school district. A dual credit academic instructor must meet the requirements set forth by the regional accrediting association (Southern Association of College and Schools). University and community and junior college personnel have the sole authority in the selection of dual credit instructors. 
Missouri Yes, for courses taught in high schools by high school teachers. Dual credit courses offered in high schools must duplicate the identical course offerings delivered on campus to matriculated students. Courses must be approved for dual credit status, and the credit awarded must be deemed acceptable in transfer by the faculty of the appropriate academic department of the college. Elements of the dual credit course to be approved by the on-campus college faculty in the appropriate academic discipline include the syllabus, textbook(s), teaching methodology, and student assessment strategies. Course content and course requirements must be comparable to those utilized in the equivalent on-campus courses with the same titles. The chief academic officer of the postsecondary institution will also be responsible for involving full time faculty in the discipline in the selection and evaluation of all dual credit faculty. The on-campus college faculty must also ensure comparable standards of evaluation.

Classes with a mixed population of dual credit and non-dual credit students must show evidence of collegiate level expectations for all students in the course. All high school students enrolled in a dual credit course must meet the same requirements for completion of the course, whether or not the student is simultaneously registered for college credit.

High school instructors must meet the same requirements for faculty teaching in institutions of higher education as required for accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission. They must have a master’s degree that includes 18 semester hours or more in the field in which they are teaching. However, institutions may use professional judgment in allowing faculty who do not meet all requirements for higher education instruction to teach dual credit courses, provided 90% of any institution’s dual credit faculty meet standard faculty eligibility requirements. Annual reports of student performance must be submitted to the chief academic officer for both review and consideration with respect to the continuation of a dual credit instructor.

New dual credit instructors must participate in orientation activities provided by the college and/or academic department. Continuing dual credit instructors must participate in the same professional development and evaluation activities as adjunct faculty on the college campus, with the recommendation for continuation being the responsibility of the campus academic department. College academic departments must provide instructors of dual credit courses with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty member to serve as a liaison. The institution of higher education must provide on-site supervision and evaluation of dual credit faculty. This process is best served when the instructional site is within a reasonable commuting distance from the institution of higher education. On-campus faculty are responsible for developing assessment and evaluation measures to ensure course quality and comparability. This comparability generally should be demonstrated by using the same assessment measures/testing procedures.

The postsecondary institution’s chief academic officer is accountable for ensuring the quality of all dual credit courses.
Montana Class B/Class 8 Alternative License: Yes. If a postsecondary faculty member is teaching a course for which students will receive high school and postsecondary credit, the faculty member must hold a class 8 dual credit license, valid for five years. To obtain the license, the faculty member must provide verification of faculty employment from the Chief Academic Officer or an appropriate official of the employing regionally accredited postsecondary institution that the class 8 licensure applicant meets the requirements of “dual credit-only postsecondary faculty” above. The faculty member must also provide a recommendation from an official from a Montana or NCATE accredited professional educator preparation program stating the applicant has earned a major or minor (or equivalent) in an endorsable teaching area, the applicant has demonstrated competency by meeting criteria set forth in a rubric developed and published by the superintendent of public instruction in consultation with K-12 education and higher education, and has complied with specified nonacademic requirements for licensure.

Concurrent Enrollment: Yes. High school faculty must be approved by the postsecondary institution. (Mont.Admin.R. 10.55.602(13)(c)
Nebraska Yes. A dual credit teaching certificate is available to allow college faculty to teach courses offered by the institution and approved by a local school system for high school credit. Each applicant for the certificate must meet specified requirements for a general teaching certificate, be eligible to teach courses for college credit as documented by the employing college's submission of the Postsecondary Verification Form, hold a master’s degree, and earned at least 6 graduate hours in the subject area for which a teaching endorsement is sought. Regulations also specify certificate renewal requirements.

In addition, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have force of law, specify:

(1) Instructors must hold a master's degree and "have the mutual support of the district and college/university participating in the dual enrollment program."
(2) High school and postsecondary faculty must "receive appropriate orientation and training[.]"
(3) "Collaboration between high school and postsecondary faculty is encouraged and faculty development is available where appropriate."
(4) "High school and postsecondary faculty maintain contact throughout the program. In some instances, this contact is facilitated by technology."

Furthermore, "Course outlines or syllabi (including at minimum a description of content, teaching strategies, performance measures, grading standards, resource materials, objectives/outcomes, and course calendar) utilized in the program meet district(s), state, and college/university standards."
Nevada Not applicable--courses are offered at the postsecondary institution or online.
New Hampshire Not set in state policy
New Jersey Yes. District boards and partner colleges must ensure that courses are equivalent to those offered to regularly admitted college students, and are taught by college faculty with academic rank. Adjunct faculty and members of the district staff who have a minimum of a master's degree may also be included.
New Mexico Yes. The postsecondary partner must approve faculty for all dual credit courses. Each district offering dual credit courses must submit a signed uniform master agreement with a public postsecondary institution to the public education department. The agreement must specify eligible courses, academic quality of dual credit courses, course approval and course requirements.

College courses eligible for dual credit must meet the rigor for postsecondary institution credit and be congruent with the postsecondary institution's academic standards. Dual credit courses offered at high schools must conform to college academic standards. Course requirements for high school students enrolled in dual credit courses must be equal to those of regular college students.
New York Not set in state policy
North Carolina Not applicable--all Career and College Promise courses are taught by community college faculty.
North Dakota Yes. According to North Dakota University System (NDUS) procedures, "The college course section taught in the high school must meet the content and academic standards of the NDUS course sections taught on campus. ... To ensure that college course standards are adhered to, the NDUS college/university course syllabus will be provided to the [high school] instructor and be used as the criteria and model for all such dual-credit college courses taught in the high school. In most cases, this will mean the use of the same (or equivalent) text materials and similar evaluation criteria to include institutional exams if need be." The postsecondary institution must monitor the course, including by "using the sponsoring college/university student evaluation document and procedure in order to solicit student feed-back."

See also the "Instructor Approval" portion of the North Dakota University System Procedures 402.3.2, Delivery of Dual-Credit College Courses.
Ohio Yes. Post-Secondary Enrollment Options students are expected and required to perform at the same level as the college’s regular students.
Oklahoma Yes. Courses at an off-campus site are taught by regular faculty whose primary educational employment is as a faculty member at the institution delivering the course. Exceptions may be made upon request to the Chancellor. “Regular faculty” is defined as a person qualified for appointment to the full-time faculty of the institution proposing to award credit. All appointments must be recommended by the academic unit awarding the credit.

The department of education must work with school districts in reviewing and approving certain courses taught by districts, including concurrent enrollment courses.
Oregon Expanded Options: Not applicable—courses are taken only at postsecondary institutions.

Dual Credit: Yes. Participating school districts and postsecondary institutions must develop written agreements based on the policies described in administrative rule regarding dual credit programs. Agreements must include criteria regarding approval of courses, selection and approval of instructors, admissions, procedures, counseling, monitoring, and evaluation. Standards for teachers of lower division collegiate courses must include a master's degree in a subject area closely related to that in which the instructor will be teaching; however, in subject areas in which individuals have demonstrated their competencies and served in professional fields and in cases in which documentation to support the individual's proficiency and high level of competency can be assembled, the master's degree requirement may be waived by the college president or substituted according to the community college's personnel policy.

The Oregon Dual Credit Standards include standards for curriculum, faculty, students, and assessment: 
  • College or university courses administered through a dual credit program are catalogued courses and approved through the regular course approval process of the sponsoring college or university. These courses have the same departmental designation, number, title, and credits as their college counterparts, and they adhere to the same course descriptions.
  • College or university courses adminstered through a dual credit program are recorded on the official academic record for students at the sponsoring college or university.
  • College or university courses administered through dual credit programs reflect the pedagogical, theoretical and philosophical orientation of the colleges’ and universities’ sponsoring academic departments.
  • Instructors teaching college or university courses through dual credit meet the academic requirements for faculty and instructors teaching in postsecondary institutions as stipulated by the respective academic departments.
  • The postsecondary institution provides high school instructors with training and orientation in course curriculum, assessment criteria, course philosophy, and dual credit administrative requirements before certifying the instructors to teach the college/university courses.
  • Instructors teaching dual credit sections are part of a continuing collegial interaction, through professional development, seminars, site visits, and ongoing communication with the postsecondary institutions’ faculty and dual credit administration. This interaction addresses issues such as course content, course delivery, assessment, evaluation, and professional development in the field of study.
  • High school students enrolled in courses administered through dual credit programs are officially registered or admitted as degree-seeking, non-degree or non-matriculated students of the sponsoring postsecondary institution.
  • Postsecondary institutions outline specific course requirements and prerequisites.
  • High school students are provided with a student guide that outlines their responsibilities as well as guidelines for the transfer of credit.
  • Dual credit students are held to the same standards of achievement as those expected of students in on-campus sections.
  • Every section of a course offered through dual credit is regularly reviewed by faculty from that discipline and dual credit staff to assure that grading standards are consistent with those in on-campus sections.
  • Dual credit students are assessed using similar methods (e.g. papers, portfolios, quizzes, labs, etc.) as their on-campus counterparts.
Pennsylvania Yes. Each concurrent enrollment agreement between a school district or area vocational technical school and a postsecondary institution must include a description and explanation of the criteria used to determine concurrent courses offered by the postsecondary institution. The agreement must provide that the course is identical to that offered when concurrent students are not enrolled—including the use of an identical curriculum, assessments and instructional materials—and enforcement of identical prerequisite coursework requirements as enforced when concurrent students are not enrolled.

A school district or area vocational school employee who meets all qualifications for an adjunct faculty member at the eligible postsecondary institution may teach a concurrent enrollment course.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds*
Rhode Island Not applicable--courses offered only at postsecondary institutions. Instructors of online dual enrollment courses must be appropriately qualified from an accredited postsecondary institution.
South Carolina Yes. Courses must be equivalent in content and rigor to the equivalent college courses offered to college students and taught by appropriately credentialed faculty. Courses must also be comparable in expected outcomes, syllabus, textbook(s), teaching methodologies, and assessment strategies to the traditional postsecondary course. Courses must be approved by the institution’s chief academic officer or designee.

The chief academic officer or designee is also responsible for selecting and evaluating all dual enrollment faculty, using Southern Association of Colleges and Schools criteria as minimal requirements, and ensuring standards of student evaluation and faculty evaluation are comparable to those required of other sections of the same courses.Orientation and evaluation of instructors teaching dual enrollment course sections rests with the appropriate academic department of the respective institution of higher education. The chief academic officer or designee must assure consistency and comparability of both orientation and evaluation across the institution. To assure comparability, academic departments must provide instructors with support services, including a designated on-campus faculty liaison.

Dual enrollment instructors must participate in the institution’s expected, relevant professional development and evaluation activities. Traditionally-delivered (non-online) dual enrollment offered in high schools should only be offered within reasonable commuting distance of the institution to facilitate on-site evaluation and supervision.

Dual enrollment courses should use the same assessment methods as traditional course offering. The college faculty in the relevant department must approve formative and summative assessment strategies and tools.
South Dakota Yes, for dual credit/dual enrollment courses offered in high schools. A high school-based dual enrollment course must be taught by a high school teacher who has been approved by the university and who meets the standards used by the institution to hire adjuncts in the discipline. While a Master’s degree in the subject/discipline teaching is preferred, faculty typically must have a Master’s degree with 15 graduate hours in the subject discipline/taught.

A faculty member in the discipline of the course from the credit granting university must be assigned to and actively engaged as a mentor for the high school teacher.

The faculty of the institution granting credit must develop the course syllabus. College courses require a minimum of 15 class hours (one hour equals 50 minutes) of class time for each semester credit hour. Additional class hours for science laboratories must be specified.

The preferred validation of student learning in the high school-based dual enrollment course for the Regental system is via the national AP or CLEP exam instruments. An acceptable alternative is a student evaluation and assessment system developed jointly by the discipline faculty of the university and the high school teacher. Under this arrangement, high school students are expected to demonstrate the same mastery of the college course as is required of college students who take the course on campus.
Tennessee Yes. Dual Enrollment: Courses must demonstrate equivalent postsecondary course learning outcomes and equivalent faculty preparation in order for the course to be taught in the high school.

Dual Credit: College courses offered at the high school during the regular school day must be taught by licensed teachers or bona fide college instructors approved by the local school system and the postsecondary institution.

Any high school may replicate a dual credit class that is offered by a public four- or two-year institution or college of applied technology and approved by the consortium. Any consortium-approved dual credit class must include a postsecondary challenge examination, which students must pass with a cut score at least equal to the receiving institution’s minimum, to receive postsecondary credit. Prior to consortium approval of a dual credit class, representatives from the University of Tennessee and the board of regents must consult with faculty members at institutions in the major or program for which the class is designed as to whether approving the class would have any negative consequences on the institution or program’s accreditation. The consortium must consider faculty members’ concerns in its determination on approval of classes and cut scores.

The chancellor of the board of regents and the president of the University of Tennessee (or designees) must convene postsecondary faculty to develop common learning outcomes and statewide challenge examinations, conduct reliability and validation activities to assure the quality and fairness of the examinations, establish cut scores, and report student scores to the division of career and technical education in the department of education. Validation requirements for postsecondary credit through a dual credit course must be determined by the postsecondary institutions and their respective governing boards.

The Consortium for Cooperative Innovative Education is charged with establishing a process for developing challenge examinations consistent with the most current “Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing” developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association and National Council on Measurement in Education, resulting in a statewide challenge examination program for designated postsecondary courses. The office of postsecondary coordination and alignment must develop a secure database to allow postsecondary institutions to review scores from dual credit course challenge examinations, to evaluate scores for potential postsecondary credit.

Any public institution of higher education may request the consortium to review a dual credit course and its challenge examination, if the institution perceives the course or its assessment to possess deficiencies. A public higher education institution may also challenge a high school’s right to continue offering a dual credit course should a perceived deficiency be demonstrated within the high school. The consortium must review the dual credit course, assessment or high school, and work with the high school(s) to remove any deficiencies. The consortium may also request that the class at a high school be withdrawn for the dual credit process until such deficiencies are corrected.

The consortium may not approve a program if the program in any way adversely affects an institution’s accreditation.
Texas Dual credit: Yes. The college selects dual credit instructors. These instructors must be regularly employed faculty members of the college or meet the same standards (including minimal requirements of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools) and approval procedures used by the college to select faculty responsible for teaching the same courses at the main campus of the college. The college must supervise and evaluate instructors of dual credit courses using the same or comparable procedures used for faculty at the main campus of the college. The college must ensure that a dual credit course and the corresponding course offered at the main campus of the college are equivalent with respect to the curriculum, materials, instruction, and method/rigor of student evaluation. These standards must be upheld regardless of the student composition of the class.

Regular academic policies applicable to courses taught at the college's main campus must also apply to dual credit courses (i.e., appeal process for disputed grades, drop policy, the communication of grading policy to students, when the syllabus must be distributed, etc.)

Courses offered through partnerships between secondary schools and public two-year colleges: The partnership agreement must address faculty qualifications, provision of student learning, and grading criteria.

Online courses: The Texas Education Agency evaluates and approves all electronic courses. If funds are insufficient to pay for evaluating and approving all courses submitted for approval, the agency must give priority to five types of courses, including courses that allow a student to earn college credit or other advanced credit.

Administrative code specifies the qualifications and professional development requirements applicable to secondary and college instructors offering electronic dual credit courses.
Utah Yes. Public school teachers teaching concurrent enrollment courses in high schools must first be approved as adjunct faculty and be supervised by the institution. Public school educators must have secondary endorsements in the subject area(s) they teach and meet highly qualified standards for their assignment(s). High school teachers with adjunct or part time faculty status must be included as fully as possible in the academic life of the supervising academic department. LEAs and institutions must share expertise and professional development, as necessary, to adequately prepare teachers at all levels to teach concurrent enrollment students and content, including both federal and state laws specific to student privacy and student records. The annual concurrent enrollment contract between an LEA and an institution must provide for discussion and training, as necessary, to all concurrent enrollment instructors about student information, student records laws, and student confidentiality.

Postsecondary faculty who are not K-12 teachers and who have significant unsupervised access to K-12 students must complete a criminal background check.

Course content, procedures, and teaching materials in concurrent enrollment programs must be approved by the appropriate department or program at an institution of higher education in order to ensure quality and comparability with courses offered on postsecondary campuses. Institutions must additionally take responsibility for examinations and program monitoring, and all procedures and materials to ensure quality and comparability with courses offered on the campus. Course outlines, texts and other materials needed, and the administrative and supervisory services, professional development, and reporting mechanisms to be provided by each party to the contract are established by LEAs and institutions in the negotiation of annual contracts. Each LEA must provide an annual report to the state office of education (1) regarding supervisory services and professional development provided by a USHE institution, and (2) indicating that all concurrent enrollment instructors are in compliance with certain faculty quality criteria.

The number of courses offered for concurrent enrollment must be kept small enough to ensure coordinated statewide development and professional development activities for participating teachers.
Vermont Dual Enrollment: Yes. When a course is offered at a high school, the public postsecondary institution must retain authority to determine course content and work with the secondary school to select, monitor, support, and evaluate instructors.

Technical: Not set in state policy
Virginia Yes, for community college courses. Colleges must ensure that all dual enrollment courses are equivalent to the other instruction offered by the college, in terms of course objectives, course syllabi, level and rigor of content, evaluation of students, textbooks, student outcomes and assessment and faculty evaluation.

Faculty must be selected and employed by the participating community college and must meet SACS [Southern Association of Colleges and Schools] and state board for community colleges faculty hiring criteria (SACS requires faculty teaching associate degree courses designed for transfer to four-year institutions to hold a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the discipline).

All dual enrollment arrangements under the Virginia Plan for Dual Enrollment must include formal mechanisms to evaluate faculty effectiveness and student success. Dual enrollment instructors must be evaluated using the guidelines adopted for all adjunct faculty members. A copy of the evaluation results must be given to the designated district representative. Student evaluations of all dual enrollment adjunct instructors must be held each semester for each course offered. Student evaluation results must be shared with the dean, program lead, faculty member, and designated district representative.
Washington Running Start: Courses taught by postsecondary faculty

College in the High School: Yes. Full-time and part-time faculty at institutions of higher education, including adjunct faculty, are eligible to teach program courses.
West Virginia Yes, for all programs.

Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Early Enrollment: A dual credit course must meet both the specified course content standards and objectives for secondary offerings and the college course requirements.

West Virginia EDGE: Career and technical centers and high schools must submit secondary course or technical program content standards and objectives (CSOs) to community and technical colleges (CTC) for evaluation and alignment with specific CTC course learner outcomes for validation for EDGE credit. Appropriate secondary level teachers and/or department of education personnel must participate in the evaluation, alignment and EDGE credit validation process with CTC faculty and academic administrators. If a state and/or national certification exam is available and required by the secondary school or career-technical center, such certification exams must be deemed as sufficient documentation that students passing these exams meet CTC course learning outcomes, and must be approved for EDGE credit. In the absence of a state/national certification exam, secondary teachers work with CTC faculty to determine if the CSOs of the secondary technical course match the learning outcomes of the CTC course. If a secondary course is approved for EDGE credit by this means, the secondary teacher agrees, as part of the validation process, to document that the high school student has achieved the appropriate skill level for awarding EDGE credit. EDGE course teachers must also attend the EDGE orientation led by the Tech Prep Consortium Coordinator. Regulations also detail the college responsibilities in ensuring the quality of EDGE courses.

Early Enrollment: A course must meet the same rigorous standards as those required for on-campus instruction, to maintain institutional accreditation by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association and to assure institutional credibility. Courses must utilize college-approved syllabi, texts, assignments and assessments. Faculty for these courses will be evaluated by college personnel using the same processes as for other college faculty. The higher education institution must facilitate communication between the appropriate academic department and the early enrollment faculty member to assure quality. Faculty teaching early enrollment courses must meet the minimum faculty credential requirements as specified by the college and as approved by the department and chief academic officer of the college or university. The institution must assign adjunct/part-time faculty status to high school teachers teaching college courses. Employment of any early enrollment adjunct/part-time faculty must be consistent with any institutional, statewide and regional accreditation standards for employment of adjunct/part-time faculty.
Wisconsin Not set in state policy
Wyoming Yes. Responsibility for the quality of dual and concurrent enrollment courses lies with the postsecondary institution. A concurrent enrollment course (taught by high school instructor appointed adjunct faculty by a community college) must be approved by the community college as having equivalent course content, learning objectives and work assignments as an existing college course, as determined by community college faculty. The Manual of Procedures for Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Courses specifies: "College faculty members and high school teachers shall engage in yearly discussions to assure use of equivalent syllabi, assignments, and end‐of‐course assessments as those used in courses taught on campus. College faculty members and high school teachers must
address common expectations and review student work on a regular basis. Courses shall be reviewed annually to assure quality."

Through the Wyoming Adjunct Professor Loan Repayment Program (WAPLR), the Wyoming Community College Commission makes funds available to high school teachers who require additional coursework to qualify as adjunct instructors under the concurrent enrollment policies of a community college district or the University of Wyoming. A loan recipient may repay the loan without cash payment by teaching at least one concurrent enrollment course for a minimum of two years, beginning the fall following completion of the courses necessary to qualify the individual to teach a concurrent enrollment course. The school district must annually verify the applicant is teaching a concurrent college level credit-bearing course.

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