Advanced Placement: State programs and funding for teacher training


Advanced Placement: State programs and funding for teacher training


This data point indicates whether states require AP teachers to attend College Board-sponsored training, receive special licensure to teach AP courses, or provide funds for AP or pre-AP teachers to receive AP training or professional development.

Highlights:
  •  Twenty-five states provide financial support and/or establish training requirements for AP teachers. 
  • Seven states provide funds and/or require administrators, including high school principals, to participate in AP training.
  • Five states provide funds for or require AP training for high school counselors.
This information was collected from statutes, state board regulations and state education agency Web sites and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

State programs and funding for teacher training
Alabama No
Alaska No
Arizona No
Arkansas Yes. AP teachers must meet Arkansas Teacher Licensure requirements and attend a College Board Advanced Placement Summer Institute. Teachers must attend no less than once every 5 years. An AP teacher who has not obtained this required training must complete an Additional Training Plan (ATP) for Advanced Placement. The teacher will have 3 years to complete the required training. Pre-AP teachers must also meet Arkansas Teacher Licensure requirements and attend a College Board sponsored or endorsed training institute or workshop in the teacher's content area at least once every 5 years. A pre-AP teacher who has not obtained the required training must complete an ATP for Pre-Advanced Placement. The teacher will have 3 years to complete the required training.

Subject to legislative appropriations, a teacher participating in the AP or pre-AP program may be awarded subsidized AP teacher training of up to $650 per teacher. Specifically, an AP or pre-AP teacher may apply to the department for a grant of up to $650 to cover cost of tuition, expenses and materials of approved training programs. Priority for training will be given to teachers who have not been previously trained. When a district offers a pre-AP program, the courses must follow a clearly recognizable sequence, i.e., 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th grade Pre-AP English, 11th grade AP English Language and Composition, and 12th grade English Literature and Composition. A teacher who is assigned to teach more than one AP or pre-AP course may apply for more than one teacher training stipend, contingent upon appropriated funding.

For purposes of continuing education and professional development requirements, each hour of AP training received by licensed personnel must be counted as professional development up to 30 hours.

In addition, the Advanced Placement Training Incentive and Program is to:
  • Provide AP content directors to work, mentor, and provide resources to AP and pre-AP teachers in math, science, and English
  • Provide nationally recognized professional development for AP and pre-AP teachers that will enhance the teachers' knowledge and pedagogical skills
  • Develop and provide materials and resources for AP and pre-AP teachers.
The department of education must provide grant funding to organizations that implement measures to achieve the goals of the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program. An organization receiving grant funding to implement the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program must be affiliated with the National Math and Science Initiative, and have demonstrated success with an Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program. An organization receiving grant funding to provide the Advanced Placement Training and Incentive Program may:
  • Develop public-private partnerships to advance math and science learning opportunities
  • Generate revenue from public or private sector entities to support other opportunities
  • Accept grants, donations, gifts, or bequests.
One of purposes of the Arkansas Smart Core Incentive Funding Program is to promote programs that contribute to student success, including professional development for AP instruction.
California Yes. Statute requests the Regents of the University of California to develop the High School Mathematics Professional Development Institutes jointly with the Trustees of California State University and the independent colleges and universities. The institutes must provide research-based instruction in the teaching of mathematics, and that includes instruction that will enhance the ability of teachers to prepare students for AP and college coursework.
Colorado Yes. The Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program established in 2014 is intended to expand access to AP classes in rural schools and enhance the participation in AP programs by students participating in the school lunch program. Regardless of the outcome of the AP exams taken, for each student who completes an AP class and who subsequently takes the AP exam, the department must distribute to the rural school $500 to be used for various purposes, including providing professional development to assist teachers in learning instructional strategies for teaching AP classes and bolstering AP content knowledge

Program funds may also be used to provide professional development for administrators concerning the content required in non-AP classes to help students prepare for future success in AP classes.
Connecticut Yes. Statute directs the State Board of Education to develop guidelines to aid local and regional boards of education in training teachers for teaching AP courses to a diverse student body.
Delaware No
District of Columbia No
Florida Yes. The Florida Partnership for Minority and Underrepresented Student Achievement program offers AP teacher training to those specific, targeted districts and schools served by the Partnership each year. Program funding does not include every school and all districts. The program provides teachers of AP or other advanced courses with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success on AP or other advanced course exams and mastery of postsecondary course content.

The partnership must annually submit to the department a report that contains an evaluation of the effectiveness of the delivered services and activities. The evaluation must include the number of middle and high school teachers trained, and the effectiveness of the training.
Georgia Yes. The Georgia Department of Education hosted 7 AP Regional Workshops in fall 2015.  These workshops are specific to course and there was no registration fee. 
Hawaii No
Idaho No
Illinois Yes. Subject to appropriation, an AP teacher must obtain appropriate training. Subject to appropriation, the state board must establish clear, specific, and challenging training guidelines that require AP teachers to obtain recognized College Board-endorsed AP training.

AP and pre-AP teacher training must do all of the following:
  • Provide AP teachers and teachers in courses that lead to AP with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced course examinations and mastery of postsecondary course content
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools
  • Provide middle, junior high, and high school teachers with AP Vertical Team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for success in AP courses.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
Regulation governing AP teacher training provides for AP grant funds to be expended only to serve students and staff in schools where at least 40% of the students are classified as “low-income”. Purposes for which grant funds may be used include curriculum development and staff training. At least 20%of the funding provided for each program must be used to defray the cost of College Board-sponsored training for teachers, counselors, and principals. Costs for other professional development activities that correspond to the purposes in the bullets above must be allowable beyond the 20% threshold. Training costs may include stipends for those participating and for substitute teachers.

Grant proposals must be evaluated with up to 45 points awarded for "Quality and Scope of the Plan", including:
  • The proposal demonstrates that the training to be funded and the staff members to be involved will permit the district to offer AP courses or preparatory programs that are not currently available, or that greater numbers of students will have access to AP courses or preparatory programs.
  • The proposal includes plans for support for and collaboration among staff members and administrators that will result in the sequential alignment of rigorous course offerings across grade levels, culminating in AP studies.
Indiana Yes. Money appropriated to the department of education to implement the AP program may be used to pay stipends for teachers assigned to teach a math or science advanced course to attend College Board summer training institutes.

For a teacher to be eligible for a stipend, the training must:
  • Provide AP and pre-AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced courses
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that enables them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools
  • Provide middle school, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP success
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
An annual report by the department of education to the state board on AP program implementation must include the number of teachers attending a summer institute offered by the College Board.
Iowa Yes. One of the functions of the Iowa online Advanced Placement academy science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) initiative is to provide AP teacher training opportunities.

In addition, an AP summer program is established at the University of Iowa for training AP instructors. The University of Iowa is responsible for the development of appropriate curricula, course offerings, provision of qualified instructors, and the selection of program participants. If funds are appropriated for the program, those funds must be used to pay for the cost of providing instructors, counselors, room and board for teachers attending the program, materials. If appropriated funds are insufficient to meet program participation demands, the university must give priority to the needs of teachers from schools that do not have AP programs.

Districts must ensure that AP course teachers are appropriately licensed by the board of educational examiners and meet the College Board's minimum certification requirements.
Kansas No
Kentucky Yes. Upon receipt of adequate federal funding, the department of education must:
  • Expand AP teacher training institutes, including offering AP teacher training instruction and assistance through the Kentucky Virtual High School or in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Education through the Kentucky Virtual University
  • Require teachers who are planning to participate in AP teacher training and complete AP training at AP institutes facilitated by the department to sign an agreement to teach at least 1 AP course in a Kentucky public school or the Kentucky Virtual High School when assigned by the school principal.
Regulation requires all high schools to establish a policy on the recruitment and assignment of students to AP courses. The policy must provide for the assignment to AP courses teachers certified in the appropriate content area and prepared through professional development to teach the AP course.

In addition, statute defines “advanced science and mathematics” to mean AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics, and IB biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental systems, mathematical studies, further mathematics, and physics. The department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the High School Advanced Science and Mathematics Course Start-up Program. 

The program is to increase the number of students who successfully complete rigorous science and math coursework during high school by providing support to high schools to offer additional advanced science and math courses with highly trained teachers and appropriate course materials.

The program provides 2-year grants to high schools. During the first year of the grant, funds must be used for planning and the training of teachers. Additional permissible uses of funds include additional training for an advanced science and math teacher. A high school applying for a grant must provide assurances that all teachers of AP advanced science and mathematics courses supported by the grant will participate in a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, as available.

Further, the department of education is directed to use funds from the science and mathematics advancement fund to establish the Middle School Mathematics and Science Scholars Program, which is intended to increase the number of students entering high school who are well-prepared to undertake rigorous mathematics and science coursework, culminating in successful completion of advanced science and mathematics courses and high achievement on AP and IB exams. The grant application must ensure that participating teachers have the skills to provide intensive, accelerated student learning in math or the sciences and that they will receive ongoing, relevant professional development.

Statute directs the state board to make long-term and annual statewide goals concerning STEM disciplines and AP/IB course participation, including the number of teachers successfully completing a College Board-endorsed AP summer training institute, and the number of teachers with the knowledge and training needed to prepare students for high achievement on AP exams in advanced science and math (defined in statute as AP biology, calculus, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and physics).
Louisiana Yes. The state department of education will provide up to $700 per teacher to attend a College Board authorized 2016 AP Summer Institute, with priority given to teachers of STEM and recently redesigned AP courses. For 2016, the department anticipates reimbursing approximately 180 teachers for attending an AP Summer Institute.
Maine Yes. Teachers teaching AP4ALL online AP courses receive training in their AP content area as well as in the pedagogy of effective online instruction. Teachers receive substantial support with regards to integrating technology, effective online communication, and all components of teaching and learning in an online environment.
Maryland No
Massachusetts Yes. 2015 H.B. 3650 makes a $2.7 million appropriation for 2015-2016 for a competitively bid, statewide performance based, integrated program to increase participation and performance in AP courses, particularly among underserved populations, to prepare students for college and career success in STEM and English. These funds must support a number of program elements, and may support teacher professional development, including a College Board-endorsed AP summer institute for math, science, and English teachers. The program must provide a minimum $1,000,000 match of private funds for direct support of educators and other uses.
Michigan No
Minnesota Yes. The state has a competitive grant program for districts and charter schools to expand access to AP and pre-AP programs. Program funds may be used to provide teacher training and instruction to more effectively serve students, including low-income and other disadvantaged students, who participate in pre-AP or AP courses.

The state may pay a portion of the tuition, room, board, and out-of-state travel costs a teacher or other interested educator incurs in participating in an AP training program. The commissioner of education must determine application procedures and deadlines, select teachers and other interested educators to participate in the training program, and determine the payment process and amount of the subsidy. The procedures determined by the commissioner must, to the extent possible, ensure that AP courses become available in all parts of the state and that a variety of course offerings are available in districts. 

In practice, a 2015 legislative appropriation allows applicant Minnesota teachers attending a summer 2016 in-state training at Carleton College and/or Augsburg College to receive a scholarship of $500 for tuition and college credit, and an additional $150 for room and board on campus. Teachers may apply for an out-of-state AP training scholarship of up to $900 if the AP course the teacher needs is not available at Carleton or Augsburg, the 2016 training dates pose a conflict, or the teacher attended Augsburg or Carleton training in 2015.

In addition, the commissioner must provide support programs during the school year for teachers who attended the training programs and experienced AP teachers. The support programs must provide teachers with opportunities to share instructional ideas with other teachers. The state may pay the costs of participating in the support programs, including substitute teachers, if necessary, and program affiliation costs.
Mississippi Yes. Each teacher planning to teach an AP course must have completed the College Board endorsed AP Summer Institute (APSI) for the course and must have obtained the AP certification through the Mississippi Department of Education's Office of Educator Licensure. Documentation showing completion of the College Board APSI is required. Teachers with the AP certification must comply with licensure renewal guidelines. AP teachers must complete the AP Summer Institute (APSI) at least every 5 years, which can be used for licensure renewal if completed during the validity period. An exception is provided to teachers who have served with Educational Testing Service as readers for the AP exam(s). Such teachers may have the initial training waived and automatically earn the AP certification if the appropriate documentation is provided. These teachers should complete the APSI at least every 5 years or serve as a reader for the AP exam(s) at least every 5 years.

AP endorsements are added by completion of College Board approved AP training. Endorsements can only be added as a supplemental endorsement to a standard 5-year license. This endorsement must be renewed every 5 years with additional AP training, and cannot be renewed with CEUs or coursework.

In addition, proposals to offer a pre-AP course must be submitted to the department of education before the course may be offered. The proposal must indicate the College Board training the Pre-AP teachers will obtain in order to teach the Pre-AP courses.  Each teacher planning to teach a Pre-AP course must have completed the College Board's Pre-AP Summer Institute, Vertical Teams Training, the Pre-AP Workshop, or other training specifically designed for Pre-AP teachers. The district is responsible for providing documentation (when requested) of participation in the Pre-AP training.
Missouri No
Montana No
Nebraska No
Nevada Yes. 2015 S.B. 515 appropriates $3 million in fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 and $5 milllion in FY 2016-17 for a college and career readiness competitive grant program. A portion of these funds are intended to support establishing new AP programs or expanding existing programs, with a focus on underserved populations in rural and urban Nevada. $200,000 of the $662,750 in funds available for the 2016-17 school year must be used to provide professional development for AP teachers. Grantees' budgets should include costs associated with College Board-sponsored trainings. Grantees will use this portion of the fund for one or more of the following:
  • In collaboration with the College Board, an AP summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time and experienced teachers in districts
  • Providing professional development for teachers to conduct and support virtual learning for AP courses.
  • Provide administrators and teachers with resources and a support system that will help them to build capacity for expanding AP courses as well as increase the number of students participating and succeeding in AP courses.
  • Providing staff release time for professional development and addressing the expenses associated with attendance at the College Board conferences.
The RFP also provides that, in collaboration with the College Board, the state will host a two-day rural summit in fall 2016 to train administrators, first-time, and experienced teachers, and teachers in rural districts. The state will also host a statewide Summer Institute training program in June 2017 for all AP teachers. Note that the only grantee expenses related to these activities are those associated with teacher travel.
New Hampshire No
New Jersey No
New Mexico No
New York No
North Carolina Yes. The state board of education must seek a partner, such as the College Board, to form the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership (Partnership), to assist in improving college readiness of secondary students and to assist secondary schools to ensure that students have access to high-quality, rigorous academics with a focus on access to AP courses.
In order to implement its responsibilities, the partner selected by the state board must provide staff to, among other duties:
  • Provide professional development to provide AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge, instructional skills, and materials to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and mastery of postsecondary course content
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP courses
  • Provide teachers of grades 7-12 with preadvanced course professional development and materials that prepare students for success in AP courses
  • Provide consulting expertise and technical assistance to support implementation
  • Prioritize assistance to schools designated as low-performing by the state board and provide for frequent visits to the schools targeted by the Partnership.
The Partnership must report annually to the department of public instruction on the Partnership's implementation of its responsibilities. Beginning November 15, 2014, the state board must report annually to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee on advanced courses in North Carolina. The report must include, at a minimum:
  • The North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership's report to the Department of Public Instruction and the state board's assessment of that report
  • Number of students enrolled in advanced courses and participating in advanced course exams, including demographic information by gender, race, and free and reduced-price lunch status
  • Student performance on advanced course exams, including information by course, local school administrative unit, and school
  • Number of students participating in 10th grade PSAT/NMSQT testing
  • Number of teachers attending summer institutes offered by the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Distribution of funding appropriated for advanced course testing fees and professional development by local school administrative unit and school
  • Status and efforts of the North Carolina Advanced Placement Partnership
  • Other trends in advanced courses and examinations.
North Dakota No
Ohio No
Oklahoma Yes. Schools may be awarded a one-time equipment and/or instructional materials grant to provide an AP course. A school receiving a grant must provide the College Board training within one year of the grant award, including at least a one-week summer institute, among other criteria. Teachers must be encouraged to attend annual follow-up training.

The state board may award schools subsidized training for AP courses or pre-AP courses, or grants for developing AP vertical teams. "Vertical teams" are defined in statute as a group of middle/junior high school and high school educators in a given discipline who work cooperatively to develop and implement a vertically aligned program aimed at helping students acquire the academic skills necessary for success in the AP program. More details on grants available for AP training grants and vertical team grants available here.
Oregon Yes. "Accelerated college credit programs" include AP, dual credit, two-plus-two, and International Baccalaureate programs. The department of education must administer a program that provides grants for education or training of current or prospective teachers providing instruction in accelerated college credit programs, among other purposes.

Any school district, community college district or state institution of higher education may apply individually or jointly for a grant. If a grant is awarded to provide education or training to current or prospective teachers providing instruction in an accelerated college credit program, the amount of the grant may not exceed 1/3 of the total cost of the education or training. In addition, the department may award the grant on the condition that the teacher, school district, community college district and state institution of higher education pay the balance of the cost of the education or training in a proportion agreed to by the teacher, districts and institution. The department may also enter into agreements with school districts, community college districts and state institutions of higher education related to the funding to provide education or training to current or prospective teachers in an accelerated college credit program.
Pennsylvania No
Rhode Island Yes. Statute provides that the purpose of the Advanced Placement (AP) teacher training program is to provide access to AP courses in the 4 core academic areas of English, math, science and social science for all students by training teachers in AP course instruction at all high schools that do not presently provide AP courses.

Subject to appropriation, the AP teacher training program is established in the department of education by the board of regents to train teachers in eligible school entities to teach AP courses in English, math, science and social science. Eligible school entities are defined as those that do not have in each of their high schools at least one AP course in the 4 core academic areas. A school district with an AP course in one or more of the 4 core academic areas but not in all 4 core academic areas is only eligible to have a teacher trained in those core academic areas in which it does not have an AP course. No more than one teacher per core academic area in each high school of an eligible school district may be trained under this program. More than one eligible school district may apply jointly to the program to train a teacher in AP course instruction if that teacher is to provide such instruction in more than one school district either through classroom instruction or through virtual learning instruction. To the extent funds are appropriated for this program, the department must provide grants per eligible teacher to the endorsed entities providing AP teacher training upon completion of the training program.

The application by an eligible school district seeking funding for the program must include:
  • The subject areas that currently have an AP course in each of its high schools
  • The subject areas among the 4 core academic areas that it does not have an AP course in each of its high schools
  • The names of the eligible teachers including the high school where they are teaching and the AP subject area that each teacher will be providing instruction and whether the instruction will be in a classroom or through virtual learning
  • The names of the eligible teacher training entities that will be providing the AP teacher training
  • Agreement to provide the AP course for at least 3 years
  • Guidelines the district will use in determining which students may be eligible to enroll in an AP course. The district may not discriminate on any basis in enrollment of students that is illegal under applicable federal or state law
  • Agreement to annually report to the department for each of the 4 core academic areas that were taught by teachers whose training was funded by this program
    • The number of students taking AP courses
    • The number of students who took the AP exam
    • The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on the AP exam.
Statute provides that if insufficient funds are appropriated to provide funding for all eligible applying school entities, the department must prioritize funding of eligible school entities based on school district poverty level.

Statute also directs the department to promulgate rules, regulations and procedures necessary for the implementation of the Access to Advanced Placement Courses for All Students Act, including:
  • In consultation with the College Board, certify those teacher-training entities qualified to provide AP teacher training in the 4 core academic areas. In certifying teacher-training entities for this program, the department must ensure that the training times and locations are geographically accessible for teachers from eligible school entities
  • The department, in consultation with the College Board, must ensure that teacher training provides AP teachers with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams
  • Starting at the end of the first year of the program, and every year thereafter, the department must issue a report to the general assembly on the AP teacher training program that includes:
    • The number of teachers receiving AP teacher training in school entities, school districts and high schools in each of the 4 core academic areas
    • The number of students taking AP courses at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas
    • The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on an AP exam at school entities in each of the 4 core academic areas.
    • The remaining unmet need for trained teachers in school entities that do not offer AP courses.
Subject to appropriation, the state board of governors for higher education and the state board of regents for elementary and secondary education must work jointly to establish clear, specific, and challenging training guidelines that require AP teachers to obtain recognized AP training endorsed by the College Board. AP and pre-AP training must do all of the following:
  • Provide AP teachers and teachers in courses that lead to AP with the necessary content knowledge and instructional skills to prepare students for success in AP courses and exams and other advanced course examinations and mastery of postsecondary course content.
  • Provide administrators, including principals and counselors, with professional development that will enable them to create strong and effective AP programs in their schools.
  • Provide middle grade, junior high, and high school teachers with AP vertical team training and other pre-AP professional development that prepares students for AP course success.
  • Support the implementation of an instructional program for students in grades 6-12 that provides an integrated set of instructional materials, diagnostic assessments, and teacher professional development in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in AP courses and in college.
In addition, statute directs the state board of regents to seek federal funding through the Advanced Placement incentive program and the Math-Science partnership program, and use it to support Advanced Placement and pre-Advanced Placement teacher professional development, and to support the implementation of an integrated instructional program for students in grades 6-12 in reading, writing, and math that prepares all students for enrollment and success in Advanced Placement courses and in college.
South Carolina Yes. The Department of Education must fund and coordinate AP teacher training courses. Each teacher of an AP course is required to have completed the appropriate AP 3-graduate-hour training program or have successfully completed 45 hours of training provided by College Board endorsed professional development opportunities verified by the appropriate college or university. Newly assigned teachers of AP courses have one calendar year to meet the AP course training requirements. Teachers who hold a PhD. in their subject area may have the training waived.

AP teachers must meet annually with their Professional Growth and Development Plan evaluators to discuss appropriate goal setting and/or revision. The plan may include, but is not limited to, College Board workshops and professional development opportunities.

An AP endorsement may be added to a teaching certificate.

AP Teacher Institutes are hosted at postsecondary institutions across the state.
South Dakota No
Tennessee Yes. An AP computer science teacher must have a valid Tennessee teacher license with an endorsement grades 7-12 and have completed the equivalent of 12 semester hours of computer course work including six semester hours of programming.
Texas Yes. An AP teacher may receive a subsidy of up to $450 for teacher training.

In the definition of "College Board Advanced Placement," state board regulations require that a College Board-approved AP Program foster teacher professional development.
Utah No
Vermont No
Virginia No
Washington Yes. Subject to funds appropriated for this purpose, the Academic Acceleration Incentive Program is intended to enhance access to dual credit courses, including AP courses. One-half of appropriated funds are to be allocated by the office of the superintendent of public instruction on a competitive basis to provide one-time grants for high schools to expand the availability of dual credit courses. Funds may be used to support AP teacher training, among other purposes.
West Virginia Yes. All AP courses must be taught by a teacher who has completed the required professional development, which includes an AP Summer Institute (APSI) delivered through the West Virginia Center for Professional Development (WVCPD) or other College Board-endorsed APSI. AP teachers must attend an APSI once every three years after completing the initial APSI. AP teachers may also meet the requirement for attendance at the APSI by holding an AP credential (see below).

An administrator from each high school must attend a WVCPD College Board endorsed AP related workshop once every two years. All AP coordinators must attend an AP Coordinator's workshop annually.

The Advanced Placement Credential is valid for 3 years. An applicant for licensure must hold a valid West Virginia Professional Certificate, successfully complete the AP Course Audit required by the College Board, be recommended by the county superintendent, and complete one of the following:
  • 30-clock hour College Board-endorsed AP Summer Institute or an equivalent College Board-endorsed AP Summer Institute offered through the WVCPD or an out-of-state provider endorsed by the College Board. All professional development for the initial AP Teacher Advanced Credential must have been completed after June 2005.
  • Be accepted by the College Board to read exams and participate in at least one AP Exam Reading
  • Be accepted by the College Board to offer institutes and workshops and deliver at least one course-specific institute or workshop
  • Successfully serve as a mentor to a novice AP teacher
  • Successfully complete at least three semester hours of coursework directly related to the AP course for which licensure is sought
An applicant for renewal of an Advanced Placement Credential must submit evidence of successful completion of the requirements for initial endorsement The requirements for renewal must have been met subsequent to the renewal of the license being renewed and within five years of the date of application.

Statute establishes the West Virginia Advanced Placement Center within the West Virginia Center for Professional Development to provide statewide coordination for the continued growth and development of AP programs in the state. The teacher training functions of the center include:
  • Coordinating AP teacher training institutes
  • Establishing a cadre of instructors for the AP teacher training institutes
  • Providing follow-up teacher training for AP teachers
  • Identifying and obtaining external sources of funding
  • Networking AP teachers through an AP newsletter
  • Serving as a liaison for the College Board and the department of education, county boards of education, institutions of higher education, the West Virginia Advanced Placement Leadership Team, the legislature, and the governor.
Statute directs the state board to establish a program coordinated through the colleges and universities or some other entity to provide training to AP teachers. Statute also calls for an appropriation to assist in the implementation of teacher training for honors and AP instruction. Teachers must be selected to teach honors and advanced placement courses based on their qualifications and academic interests and the needs of the students. County boards of education must, if necessary, make arrangements for the teachers to attend a training program
Wisconsin No
Wyoming No

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