Advanced Placement: All high schools/districts required to offer AP


Advanced Placement: All high schools/districts required to offer AP


This data point indicates whether states require high schools or districts to offer AP courses.

Highlights:
  • Eight states and the District of Columbia require all high schools or districts to offer AP coursework.
  • Fourteen states require all high schools or districts to offer advanced coursework, which may include AP courses.
  • Policies in 28 states are silent on this issue.
This information was collected from statutes and state board regulations, and was fully updated in 2016. Please contact Jennifer Dounay Zinth at 303.299.3689 or jzinth@ecs.org with questions regarding state policies on this issue.
 

All high schools/districts required to offer AP
Alabama No
Alaska No
Arizona No
Arkansas Yes. All high schools must offer at least 4 AP courses. All districts must offer 1 AP course in each of 4 areas: English, math, science and social studies. These offerings must be phased in over a 4-year period beginning in the 2005-2006 school year. Unlike districts, however, high schools are not required to offer courses in specific subject areas.

Districts must also offer pre-AP courses.

Any high school offering the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program is exempt from the requirement to offer AP courses. 
California No
Colorado No
Connecticut Yes. Each local and regional board of education must provide an advanced placement course program.
Delaware No
District of Columbia Yes. At least 4 AP courses are offered at each traditional high school.
Florida No. However, each high school must offer an IB Program, an Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) Program, or a combination of at least 4 courses in dual enrollment or AP, including one course each in English, math, science, and social studies. To meet this requirement, school districts may provide courses through virtual instruction, if the virtual course significantly integrates postsecondary level content for which a student may earn college credit, as determined by the department of education, and for which a standardized end-of-course assessment, as approved by the department, is administered.
Georgia No
Hawaii No
Idaho No. However, all high schools must either offer "advanced opportunities," (defined as AP courses, dual credit courses, Tech Prep, or IB programs), or provide opportunities for students to take courses at the postsecondary campus.
Illinois No
Indiana Yes. Each high school must provide at least two AP and two dual credit course offerings.

In addition, each school corporation must provide AP science and math courses to qualified students.
Iowa Yes. Districts must make AP courses available to their resident students through direct instruction on-site, collaboration with another school district, or via the online Iowa AP Academy.
Kansas No
Kentucky No. However, all high schools must offer AP, IB, dual enrollment, or dual credit courses.
Louisiana Yes. Each high school must offer at least one AP course in each of 4 content areas, plus one additional AP course.
Maine No. However, secondary schools must offer opportunities for learning in multiple pathways, which may include Advanced Placement.
Maryland No
Massachusetts No
Michigan No
Minnesota No
Mississippi Yes. All districts must offer at least one AP course in English, math, science and social studies. Distance learning or the Mississippi Virtual Public School may be used as an appropriate alternative for the delivery of AP courses.. Any public high school offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is exempt from the requirement to offer AP courses.
Missouri No
Montana No
Nebraska No
Nevada No
New Hampshire No. However, local boards must require that each school has an instructional program that includes a policy encouraging students to pursue and demonstrate advanced course work, including AP and dual enrollment courses.
New Jersey No. However, local boards must establish a process to approve post-secondary learning opportunities that may include AP courses, CLEP, or concurrent/dual enrollment.
New Mexico No. However, at least one of the units required for graduation must be earned as an AP, honors, dual credit, or online course.
New York No
North Carolina No. However, local boards must ensure that all high school students have access to advanced courses (AP or International Baccalaureate) in language arts, math, science, and social studies. Such access may be provided through enrollment in courses offered through or approved by the North Carolina Virtual Public School.
North Dakota No. However, in order to be approved by the state superintendent, each public and nonpublic high school must offer one unit of an AP or dual credit course.
Ohio No. However, all public high schools are required to offer at least one advanced standing program, defined as a program that enables a high school student to earn credit toward a degree from an institution of higher education, or that enables a high school student to complete coursework that may earn credit toward a degree from an institution of higher education upon the student's attainment of a specified score on an exam covering the coursework. Advanced standing programs include AP, College Credit Plus (dual enrollment), International Baccalaureate, and early college high school programs.
Oklahoma No
Oregon No. However, all districts must offer accelerated college credit programs, which include AP as well as dual credit, two-plus-two, and International Baccalaureate programs. Districts must provide students in grades 9-12 with accelerated college credit programs in English, math, and science, or ensure students in grades 9-12 have online access to accelerated college credit programs, including those related to English, math and science.
Pennsylvania No
Rhode Island No. However, LEAs are required to establish pathways that represent a set of courses and other programs within its guaranteed and viable comprehensive course of study and that provide students with the means to meet their academic and career goals. AP is one such option to meet this requirement.
South Carolina Yes. Each school district must provide AP courses in all secondary schools that enroll an adequate number of academically talented students to support the course. Statute directs the state board to determine what constitutes an adequate number of students for an AP course. State board policy requires all schools serving grades 11 and 12 to offer ≥ 1 AP course(s).
South Dakota No
Tennessee No. However, if a district offers AP courses, it must annually approve a list of AP courses, provide this list to the public, and ensure that approved courses substantially incorporate the learning objectives and course descriptions as defined by the College Board.
Texas No. However, all districts are required to offer students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of at least 12 semester credit hours of college credit in high school, via AP, IB, dual credit, articulated postsecondary courses provided for local credit or articulated postsecondary advanced technical credit courses provided for state credit, or any combination thereof.
Utah No
Vermont No
Virginia No. However, all high schools must offer at least 3 AP, IB or Cambridge courses, college-level courses for degree credit, or any combination thereof.

In addition, 2016 S.B. 336 directs the state board, in establishing graduation requirements, to require all students to either (1) complete an AP, honors, or International Baccalaureate course or (2) earn a state board-approved career and technical education credential.
Washington No
West Virginia Yes. All high schools must offer at least 1 AP course each in English, math, science, and social studies.
Wisconsin No
Wyoming No

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