Has the state adopted teacher leader standards?

Teacher Leadership and Licensure Advancement

Has the state adopted teacher leader standards?

October 2018



Overview
Teacher leader standards establish the competencies and skills unique to a teacher leader. Seventeen states have adopted teacher leader standards. Of these, nine states have adopted their own standards, six states have adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium, and two states have adapted the Teacher Leader Model Standards.

Definition
  • Teacher Leader Model Standards: Model standards for teacher leadership developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium and released in 2011. The standards include the following seven domains: 1) fostering a collaborative culture to support educator development and student learning; 2) accessing and using research to improve practice and student learning; 3) promoting professional learning for continuous improvement; 4) facilitating improvements in instruction and student learning; 5) promoting the use of assessments and data for school and district improvement; 6) improving outreach and collaboration with families and community; and 7) advocating for student learning and the profession.

 

Has the state adopted teacher leader standards? Citations
Alabama Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Ala. Admin. Code 290-3-3-.52.01
Alaska No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Arizona No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Arkansas No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
California No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Colorado No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Connecticut No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Delaware No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
District of Columbia No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Florida No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Georgia Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards.


Rules 505-3-.72

Rules 505-3-.104
Hawaii No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Idaho Yes. The state has adapted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Idaho Admin. Code r. 08.02.02.022
Illinois Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. The state also requires Teacher Leader Endorsement programs align to the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium.

Ill. Admin. Code tit. 23, § 25.32

Source
Indiana No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Iowa Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Iowa Admin. Code r. 281-83.2(284,284A)
Kansas Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Source (page 139)
Kentucky Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. 16 Ky. Admin. Regs. 1:016

Source
Louisiana No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Maine Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
Maryland No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Massachusetts No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Michigan Yes. The state has adapted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
Minnesota Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
Mississippi No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Missouri No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Montana No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Nebraska No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Nevada No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
New Hampshire No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
New Jersey Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
New Mexico No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
New York No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
North Carolina Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Source
North Dakota No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Ohio Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Source
Oklahoma No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Oregon Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
Pennsylvania Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. Source
Rhode Island No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards. However, teachers seeking the Instructional Leader Certificate must demonstrate field competencies prescribed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. R.I. Code R. 21-2-59:11
South Carolina No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
South Dakota No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Tennessee Yes. The state has adopted the Teacher Leader Model Standards developed by the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium. Source
Texas No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Utah No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Vermont No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Virginia No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Washington No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
West Virginia Yes. The state has adopted its own teacher leader standards. W. Va. Code R. 126-165-6
Wisconsin No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.
Wyoming No. The state has not adopted teacher leader standards.

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