Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition

Dual / Concurrent Enrollment:

Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition


This database indicates whether a state has a common statewide dual enrollment policy (or state policies governing more than one type of dual enrollment program), or if dual enrollment policies are left to the discretion of local districts and postsecondary institutions/systems.

Why does it matter?
  • Policy helps institutionalize practice.
  • Differing dual enrollment programs may lead to confusion at the local level as to student eligibility requirements, funding mechanisms, and other components that may ultimately discourage student or school participation.
Methodology: This information was collected from statutes, regulations and other state policy documents and guidelines as of April 2019. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.

Last updated: April 2019
 

Who is primarily responsible for paying tuition Citations
Alabama Local decision. At Alabama Community College System (ACCS) institutions, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent, unless covered by alternative funding sources, which may include scholarship funds (when allocated by the legislature) for Career and Technical Education Dual Enrollment (CTEDE) to cover costs if included in institutional agreements and may cover costs of courses in eligible CTE programs if taken concurrently with CTE course(s).  Ala. Admin. Code 290-3-1-.02(11) ACCS 801.03 Ala. Code Sec. 16-28-3.1
Alaska Generally it is a local decision.

At the University of Alaska, payment of dual enrollment varies depending on the type of delivery. 
  • For a regularly scheduled postsecondary course or a course delivered within a middle college, regular tuition and fees are paid for by the student, school district, or external funder.
  • If the postsecondary course is delivered under an agreement with a school district, typically the school district and sometimes the student will pay $25/credit. 
BOR R10.05.015(B)(2)(d), (C)(1)
Arizona All courses: Local decision. Specifically:

For courses offered at postsecondary campuses: Unless the student's high school or postsecondary institution has volunteered to pay the tuition, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.

For community college courses offered at high schools, the agreement or contract between the school district/charter school and community college district must specify student tuition and financial aid policies, including if scholarships or grants are awarded to dual enrollment students.

If a student counts in calculating a school's average daily membership, the district or charter school pays the postsecondary or community college tuition for that student.

2015 legislation establishes the tribal college dual enrollment program fund, and authorizes 15% of unclaimed lottery funds to be transferred into the fund. The bill provides the fund may also include other monies appropriated by the legislature and gifts, grants, devises and other contributions of money or property from any lawful public or private source. The Department of Education must disburse tribal college dual enrollment program funds by compensating tribal colleges for tuition and fees that are waived to allow high school students to attend classes at tribal college campuses, including dual enrollment classes the tribal college provides electronically to high school students.
ADM reference: A.R.S. § 15-901.07 Tribal College Dual Enrollment Fund: AR.S. § 5-568, A.R.S § 15-244.01
Arkansas Concurrent enrollment: Local decision. Tuition is paid by the student/parent unless paid by a school district, college scholarship, grant, or private foundation. If the course costs are paid by the school district, a college/university scholarship, a grant, or a private foundation, a signed agreement must exist between the school district, the external entity or foundation, and the publicly-supported or private institution of higher education.

Students who are eligible for national school lunch and who enroll in concurrent courses offered on a high school campus where such a student is enrolled or where a teacher employed by the district teaches the class, are not required to pay for up to six hours of endorsed concurrent courses. In such as case, costs are to be paid a) by the district where the student is enrolled; b) by the institution of higher education offering the course, or c) through a cost-sharing agreement between the higher education institution and the enrolling district.

Endorsed Concurrent Enrollment: A state-supported two-year or four-year institution of higher education may offer a reduced tuition rate. The reduction in tuition may not be considered an institutional scholarship.

Dual enrollment: Student/parent
Ark. Code Ann. § 6-16-1204(e)(1)(A) Code Ark. R. 005.15.7-4.06
California Original program: Student/parent. A community college district may exempt special part-time students from fee requirements, but is not required to do so.

College and Career Access Pathways partnerships: Unclear. A high school student may not be assessed a fee prohibited by Section 49011.
West's Ann. Cal. Educ. Code § 76300(f)
Colorado Local education provider (i.e., school district, charter school, or board of cooperative services (BOCES). A cooperative agreement must establish the tuition rate at which the local education provider pays the institution of higher education for any courses in which a student concurrently enrolls. The tuition rate must not exceed the student share of the tuition rate established for Colorado residents enrolled in the course (or if offered by a four-year institution, the student share of the tuition rate established for Colorado residents enrolled in a general studies course at a community college). However, nothing prohibits an institution of higher education from charging tuition or associated fees to a student or his/her parent or in addition to the tuition paid by the student's local education provider. If the student does not complete the course without the consent of the student’s principal, the student and parent must reimburse the local education provider for tuition paid. Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 22-35-104 (6)(b)(III) Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 22-35-105(3) and (4)
Connecticut Student/parent Response from CT DOE to CT profile
Delaware Local decision. Payment of tuition varies depending upon the type of dual enrollment and district policy -- may be paid by the district, grant-funded, paid by the student or student's parent, or covered by waivers for eligible students.

Funding sources such as grants must be identified, as well as the procedures for applying and the procedures for awarding such funds or waivers. No student may be denied access to dual credit or dual enrollment courses because of the student's or family's inability to pay.

The Delaware legislature has appropriated $1.5 million annually since 2014 for college access funding. The appropriation includes a line item to cover dual enrollment tuition, books, and other expenses, (including student transportation as needed), for low-income students. Funds are automatically awarded to districts retroactively based on the percentage of low-income dually enrolled students reported to the department of education.

Delaware colleges have developed a price structure for dual enrollment courses. Schools are offered a flat rate per section of a course offered at a high school, rather than a per-student rate, making the offering of dual enrollment more affordable for schools.
para 1-2: 14 Del. Admin. Code 506 para 3: Correspondence with state contact para 4: Correspondence with state contact
District of Columbia Local decision. LEAs and postsecondary institutions agree in the Partnership Agreement on who will be responsible for tuition in the Partnership Agreement.  Currently for most programs, tuition is primarily paid by the postsecondary institutions.  In cases where it is not, tuition is paid from the District of Columbia dual enrollment fund, which is administered by the State Superintendent for Education’s office.  A Dual Enrollment Partnership Agreement must provide that students will not be charged tuition for dual enrollment courses.

*However, current practice does not reflect regulatory provisions*

The Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) is offering a funding opportunity for partnering local education agencies (LEAs) and institutions of higher education (IHEs) providing dual enrollment programming to eligible students in the District during the 2019-20 school year. This is similar to funding historically provided by OSSE.

This funding opportunity is open to all eligible IHEs in partnership with LEAs located in the District of Columbia. The total amount available for this opportunity is $150,000. Awards are anticipated to equal $565 per student per course to cover tuition, books, fees, and transportation.

OSSE requires applicants to be in a partnership for this grant initiative. A Partnership is defined as a single IHE lead applicant with one or more LEA partners. All partners must submit a signed partnership agreement describing programmatic and fiscal responsibilities and confirming commitment to the project. The document will describe how the two (or more) organizations will work together.

D.C. Mun. Regs. Subt. 5-A, § 2401.3 Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), retrieved August 31, 2018 https://osse.dc.gov/page/dual-enrollment-scholarship-funding-opportunity
Florida Student's district, if enrolled in a public institution. When instruction takes place on the postsecondary campus during the fall or spring term, the school district pays the institution the standard tuition rate per credit hour from funds provided in the Florida Education Finance Program. When dual enrollment is provided on the high school site by postsecondary institution faculty, the school district reimburses the institution for the costs associated with the postsecondary institution's proportion of salary and benefits. When dual enrollment is provided at the high school by school district faculty, the school district is not responsible for payment to the postsecondary institution.

Subject to annual appropriation in the General Appropriations Act, a public postsecondary institution must receive an amount of funding equivalent to the standard tuition rate per credit hour for each dual enrollment course taken during the summer term. 

Any dual enrollment student enrolled at a course offered through a public postsecondary institution is exempt from the payment of registration, tuition, and fees, including laboratory fees. Instructional materials must be made available to dual enrollment public high school students free of charge. Student exemptions from payment of instructional materials and tuition and fees, including laboratory fees, do not apply to students who enroll in an eligible independent institution. A Florida College System institution may provide instructional materials at no cost to a home education student or student from a private school. Instructional materials purchased by a district school board or Florida College System institution board of trustees for dual enrollment students are the property of the purchasing board. Students in dual enrollment courses may also be calculated as the proportional shares of full-time equivalent enrollments they generate for a Florida College System institution or university conducting the dual enrollment instruction. Early admission students are  considered dual enrollments for funding purposes. Students may be enrolled in dual enrollment instruction provided by an eligible independent college or university and may be included in calculations of full-time equivalent student memberships for basic programs for grades 9 through 12 by a district school board.
para 1: F.S.A. § 1007.271 (21)(n)(1)
para 2: F.S.A. § 1007.271(21)(n)(2)
para 3: F.S.A. § 1011.62(1)(i), (West's F.S.A. § 1007.271(2) and (17), 1009.25(1)(a)
Georgia State. Program funding is provided to the Georgia Student Finance Commission via an annual appropriation (approved FY19 Dual Enrollment Budget: $105,028,623.00). In order to participate in the program, each eligible postsecondary institution must enter into a participation agreement with the Georgia Student Finance Commission agreeing to: 
  • Waive all mandatory and noncourse related fees for participating students
  • Provide course books at no charge to the student
  • Accept the amount paid by the commission as full payment for an eligible high school student's tuition, mandatory and noncourse related fees, and course books.
Statute directs the commission to set criteria for funding for tuition, mandatory and noncourse related fees, course books and transportation. The amount of such funds to be paid must be determined by the commission. The commission must create a grant program, subject to the availability of funds, by which participating public eligible high schools may apply for transportation grants (funds eliminated in FY19 budget). Such grants must be awarded based on criteria, terms, and conditions determined by the commission in consultation with the department of education.

In the event the funds made available to the commission are not sufficient to meet all funding requirements of the program, the amount paid eligible postsecondary institutions must be reduced by the commission. Postsecondary institutions under no circumstances may charge an eligible high school student for tuition, mandatory and noncourse related fees, or books.
Ga. Code Ann., § 20-2-161.3(j) through (l)
Hawaii Combination of state and student/parent.  Hawaii DOE schools can apply to access state legislative funding provided to the Hawaii DOE for Early College classes.  
 
For Running Start classes, student/parent is responsible for paying tuition, unless the student is economically disadvantaged, in which case the student may apply for a GEAR UP Hawaii Running Start Scholarship. The scholarship is for tuition/fees and required textbooks for a 3- to 4-credit class. Priority is given to students who have not previously received a scholarship.

2015 S.B. 374 repealed a statutory provision that required high school students to pay tuition and fees for every college course.  A legislative appropriation was provided for Early College classes starting with the 2017-18 school year.  No legislative funding is currently available to support other dual credit programs.
Dual Credit Website
Idaho Local decision. Either student/parent, or the school district may make payments or partial payments for courses taken for secondary credit. The district cannot make payments to a postsecondary institution for a course taken for postsecondary credit only, or for a course from which a student officially withdraws during the first 14 days of the semester, or for courses for audit.

Students attending public schools are eligible for $4,125 to use toward overload courses, dual credits, postsecondary credit-bearing examinations and career technical certificate examinations. Students may access these funds in grades 7 through 12 for:
(a) Overload courses, the distribution of which may not exceed $225 per overload course. A student must take and successfully be completing a full credit load within a given school year to be eligible for funding of an overload course. An overload course must be taken for high school credit to be eligible for funding.

(b) Eligible dual credits, the distribution of which may not exceed seventy-five dollars ($75.00) per one (1) dual credit hour. Dual credit courses must be offered by a regionally accredited postsecondary institution. To qualify as an eligible dual credit course, the course must be a credit-bearing 100 level course or higher.

(c) Eligible postsecondary credit-bearing or career technical certificate examinations. The state department of education is required to  maintain a list of eligible exams and costs. Eligible examinations include: Advanced placement(AP); International baccalaureate (IB); College-level examination program (CLEP); and (iv) Career technical examinations.

(d) Career technical education (CTE) including assessments that lead to a badge recognized by the division of career technical education. The division of career technical education is required to maintain a list of eligible CTE examinations and costs.

Public school students who have completed all state high school graduation requirements (except senior project) before the beginning of their final 12th grade semester or trimester are eligible for assistance in paying for up to 18 credits per semester or 12 credits per trimester of dual credit courses. The state department of education must distribute funds from moneys appropriated for the educational support program to defray the per credit cost charged by a postsecondary institution for a dual credit course, up to $75 per credit hour. An 11th grader qualifies for an amount equal to the amount necessary to cover the dual credit fee set by the state board for up to 3 postsecondary semester or equivalent credits. A 12th grader who does not qualify for final semester/trimester financial aid qualifies for an amount equal to cover the dual credit fee set by the state board for up to 6 postsecondary semester or equivalent credits.

The state department of education must annually report to the house and senate education committees on the number of students benefitting from this dual credit financial assistance, and the number of credits awarded and amounts paid during the previous school year.

If a student fails to earn credit for any course for which the department has paid a reimbursement, the student must pay for and successfully earn credit for one such course before the department may pay any further reimbursement for the student.
para 1: Idaho Code Ann. § 33-5110 para 2: Idaho Code Ann. § 33-4602 para 3-5: Idaho Code Ann. § 33-4602(1)(a), (2)
Illinois Local decision. In some districts, the tuition is completely waived, others offer discounted tuition, and some charge full tuition. This is often related to where the dual credit is delivered (at the high school versus on campus) and who is delivering it (community college faculty versus high school faculty).

For advanced vocational training programs: Participating community college bill each participating school district for the per capita cost of operating the community college attended, or a charge for participation may be made in accordance with the joint agreement between the community college district and the student's school district. Such agreement may not provide for payments in excess of actual operating costs. Participating high schools may use state aid monies to pay the charges.
para 1: IL respondent para 2: 105 ILCS 5/10-22.20a
Indiana Generally: Student/parent. However, the commission for higher education may identify a set of concurrent enrollment college courses that are offered in the high school setting for postsecondary credit and receive state funding as priority dual credit courses. The commission must set the tuition rate charged a student for a priority dual credit course. The commission on higher education has set tuition at no more than $25/credit hour for courses on the Priority Course List. Several institutions offer courses at costs below this commission requirement. 

Postsecondary Enrollment Program: For students enrolled at Ivy Tech Community College and taking courses on campus, the school corporation may be required to pay tuition. 

Upon demonstration of financial need, an eligible institution may grant a student financial assistance, including a tuition waiver. Ivy Tech is eligible for reimbursement for costs incurred to deliver courses taken by a student whose tuition is waived.
para 1: IC 21-43-1.5-1 and -2, Policy on Dual Credit Courses Taken in a High School Setting, May 9, 2013, "Early College Credit" ICHE
para 2-3: IC 21-43-4-19.5, IC 21-43-4-12 
Iowa Student's district. However, the payment varies by Senior Year Plus (SYP) program:

Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO): A school district must pay a tuition reimbursement amount to a postsecondary institution that has enrolled its resident eligible students. For a student in an open enrollment situation, tuition is paid by the receiving district. The amount of tuition reimbursement for each separate course must equal the lesser of
  • The actual and customary costs of tuition, textbooks, materials, and fees directly related to the course taken by the eligible student
  • $250
An eligible postsecondary institution must make pro rata adjustments to tuition reimbursement amounts based on federal guidelines.

However, if the student fails to complete and receive credit for the course, the student or parent must reimburse the school district for its costs.

Postsecondary institutions may not charge students for textbooks, materials, or fees directly related to the course in which the student is enrolled except that the student may be required to purchase equipment that becomes the property of the student.

For students at the Iowa school for the deaf and the Iowa braille and sight saving school, the state board of regents must pay a tuition reimbursement amount by June 30 of each year.

Concurrent Enrollment: Districts that enter into a concurrent enrollment agreement are responsible for payment to the cooperating community college per the terms stipulated in their agreement. Districts are eligible to receive supplementary weighting for students enrolled in concurrent enrollment courses. As stipulated in statute, students enrolled in a qualifying concurrent enrollment course are assigned an additional weighting of .70 for career and technical courses and .46 for liberal arts and science courses.

All programs: Districts and eligible postsecondary institutions may not charge students for tuition.
I.C.A. § 299A.12(3)(f), I.C.A. § 261E.7(1), I.C.A. § 261E.7(1), (3) and (4), I.C.A. § 261E.7(3), I.C.A. § 261E.7(1), (I.C.A. § 261E.7; Iowa Admin. Code 281-22.11(6), I.C.A. § 257.11(3) Concurrent Enrollment Weight: I.C.A. § 257.11(3)(b)
Kansas General coursework: Student/parent. For academic courses, tuition is an amount negotiated by the school district and the college/university under this program. Tuition, books, equipment and any other costs of enrollment are the responsibility of the student or the student's parent. No school district may be responsible for the payment of concurrent enrollment tuition.

For tiered, funded CTE courses: Combination of state and student/parent. Students may be charged fees (including expenses for books and supplies) but not tuition. Each school year, to the extent sufficient monies are appropriated to the secondary CTE program, KSDE is required to distribute state funds to community colleges, technical colleges and the Washburn Institute of Technology for the cost associated with secondary students enrolled in postsecondary CTE programs.
K.S.A. § 72-3222, 3224 K.S.A. § 72-3819, K.S.A. § 72-3810
Kentucky

To promote dual credit coursework opportunities at no cost to eligible high school students, the General Assembly established the Dual Credit Scholarship Program. A "Participating institution" is defined as a postsecondary institution that:

  • Has an agreement with the authority for the administration of the Dual Credit Scholarship Program;
  • Charges no more than the dual credit tuition rate ceiling per credit hour, including any additional fees, for any dual credit course it offers to any Kentucky public or nonpublic high school student;
  • Does not charge any tuition or fees to an eligible high school student for an approved dual credit course beyond what is paid by the Dual Credit Scholarship Program when the course is not successfully completed (successful completion means a student receiving both secondary and postsecondary credit upon completion of an approved dual credit course).
"Dual credit tuition rate ceiling" means one-third (1/3) of the per credit hour tuition amount charged by the Kentucky Community and Technical College System for in-state students.

Otherwise, tuition payment is a local decision. The Guiding Principles for the CPE/KDE Dual Credit Policy provide, “The costs of delivering dual credit courses should be shared by a combination of state, postsecondary institutions, secondary schools, state-funded scholarships, and students and families so that no one entity is solely responsible for such costs."

Under the Dual Credit Policy: 

  • Tuition and other fees for dual credit courses must be outlined in writing and provided to each student, parent, and secondary school by the postsecondary institution prior to enrollment in such courses. Participating postsecondary institutions must also inform students and parents of scholarships and any fee waivers.
  • The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) must provide student support for dual credit scholarships through funding provided by the General Assembly for the existing Mary Jo Young Scholarship or other newly created dual credit scholarship programs administered by KHEAA. 
  • The CPE must create and monitor an accountability system with metrics related to student access, quality, affordability and transferability of credit.
  • Secondary schools and postsecondary institutions must jointly develop a process to determine student eligibility for financial assistance.

Under the Guiding Principles of the Dual Credit Policy for Kentucky Public and Participating Postsecondary Institutions and Secondary Schools: "The costs of delivering dual credit courses should be shared by a combination of state, postsecondary institutions, secondary schools, state-funded scholarships, and students and families so that no one entity is solely responsible for such costs."

Created 2017 Ky. Acts ch. 165, sec. 1, effective April 10, 2017 (Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 164.786(4)(c)) Council on Postsecondary Education/KDE Dual Credit Policy (effective fall 2016)(retrieved 11/01/2018
Louisiana Dual Enrollment: State, for public school student. Student/parent, for nonpublic school student. In 2015 H.C.R. 136 asked the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, in consultation with the Board of Regents, to study the feasibility and costs of using state funds to pay for students in approved home study programs to participate in dual enrollment programs established by the Board of Regents and to submit a written report of its findings and conclusions to the house education committee no later than 60 days before the beginning of the 2016 regular legislative session. S.R. 141 (2018 regular session) asked that BESE, the state department and each local board maximize funding and availability of dual enrollment courses.

Course Choice Dual Enrollment: The course provider may charge tuition to any eligible participating student in an amount approved by the department of education. Fifty percent of the course amount or tuition is paid to the course provider upon student enrollment in a course; the remaining 50% is paid upon course completion. 

TOPS – Tech Early Start Award: Louisiana Student Financial Assistance Commission pays $150 for each three credit hour or equivalent time course, up to two courses per semester in grades 11-12.
DE: La. Rev. Stat. Ann. 17:3137(C) Course Choice: La. Rev. Stat. Ann. 17:4002.6(B), (C) TOPS - Tech: La. Rev. Stat. Ann. 17:5081(B)(3)
Maine General program: Combination of department of education and student/parent (includes home schooled students who meet requirements). Until the 2018-2019 school year, the department will pay 50% of the in-state tuition for the first 6 credit hours taken each semester by a student at an eligible institution and up to 12 credit hours per academic year. The eligible institution may not make any additional tuition charges for the course but may impose fees and charges, other than tuition, that are ordinarily imposed on students not covered by this chapter.

Beginning with the 2018-2019 school year, the department must reimburse each eligible institution the cost of in-state tuition up to the maximum rate, calculated as follows: 50% of the average in-state tuition rate for the highest and lowest in-state tuition rates established by the University of Maine System for eligible institutions within the system for the first 6 credit hours taken each semester by a student at an eligible institution and up to 12 credit hours per academic year. The eligible institution may not make any additional tuition charges for the course but may impose fees and charges, other than tuition, that are ordinarily imposed on traditional students. Funds appropriated to the department to carry out the purposes of this chapter must be in addition to the customary and ongoing amounts appropriated for general purpose aid for local schools.

Dual enrollment career and technical education program: Not specified
General program: ME. Rev. Stat. tit. 20-A, § 4775 and § 4772 (home school provision)
Maryland Combination of district and student/parent. Both credit and non-credit courses are eligible for tuition reductions under dual enrollment provided the non-credit courses are career-related (i.e., youth apprenticeships). A public institution of higher education may not charge tuition to a dually enrolled student.

Tuition Scale: Local Boards of Education pay the lesser of tuition costs for dually enrolled public secondary school students as follows:
  • Category 1: First 4 courses – Public Senior Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) charge 75% of tuition. Community colleges charge 75% of tuition or 5% of per pupil foundation amount
  • Category 2: 5 or more courses – Public Senior IHEs charge 90% of tuition, Community colleges charge 90% of tuition or 5% of per pupil foundation amount
  • Category 3: For Agreements established prior to July 1, 2013: If lesser than categories 1 or 2, the agreement is the basis for tuition.
 Local boards may recoup costs from students as follows:
  •  First 4 courses – Boards may charge students a fee not to exceed 90% of the amount paid for tuition
  • 5 or more courses – Boards may charge students a fee not to exceed 100% of the amount paid for tuition
  • Boards must waive tuition fees for students who are eligible for Free and Reduced Price Meals (FARMS).
Fees: Colleges can charge applicable and reasonable fees for all dually enrolled students, including those who receive Free and Reduced Price Meals. Note: If an agreement exists between a public school and a public IHE whereby the school agrees to pay for more than 4 courses, the school must pay for the number under the agreement. Students are encouraged to contact the college admissions office or their school counselor to seek further information.

The Maryland Higher Education Commission administers an Early College Access Grant for dually enrolled students, as well as a grant program for part-time undergraduate students, including dually enrolled students. Under both programs, grant recipients must demonstrate financial need according to Commission-established criteria. The Commission allocates Early College Access Grant funds to an institution based on the number of dually enrolled students receiving credit for courses completed at the institution. The institution then distributes the grant awards to eligible students.

Funds under the part-time undergraduate grant program are allocated by the Commission to each institution based on the number of undergraduate part-time students who demonstrate financial need. The institution then distributes the grant awards to eligible students. Institutions may use up to 10% of the part-time grant allocation to provide grants to students who are dually enrolled.
MD Code, Education, § 18-14A-04 Non-credit course (apprenticeship): Early College Access Grant: MD Code, Education, § 18-14A-01, 18-1401, MD Code, Education, § 18-14A-02
Massachusetts General program: Not set in state policy

Commonwealth Dual Enrollment Partnership: Students do not pay tuition or fees for courses taken through CDEP. However, some institutions may charge a nominal admission fee (for example, $25), which may be waived. Student who demonstrate financial need may also receive additional assistance for books, supplies, and transportation, depending on the participating postsecondary institution.

In 2015-16, the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education asked campuses to focus on cohort based models through CDEP. The aim is to pay for the faculty salary and waive individual tuition and fees for individual students as a way to keep costs under control.
General   CDEP  Students
Michigan PSEO and Career and Technical Preparation Act: Combination of district and student/parent. For a public school student, the district is required to pay to the higher education institution either the amount of the tuition or the amount of state funding the district receives for that student for the part of the day the student attends the course or career and technical preparation program. For example, if a student is enrolled in PSEO or Career and Technical Preparation Act coursework 20% of the school day and the district receives $10,000 from the state for that student, the district must pay the higher education institution either the cost of tuition or $2,000 (20 x $10,000), whichever is less. A Dual Enrollment Calculation Worksheet can be found here

A district may, but is not required to, pay more to a postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program on a student’s behalf than is required by statute, and may use local school operating revenue for that purpose.

The student must pay any additional tuition costs above and beyond what the district is required to contribute.

For a nonpublic school student, the department of treasury pays the institution or career and technical preparation program. The student is responsible for paying the remainder of the costs that exceed the amount the department of treasury is statutorily required to pay.

A public school or nonpublic school student who does not complete a course must refund the school district or department of treasury any funds not reimbursed the district or department of treasury by the postsecondary institution or career and technical preparation program. If the eligible student does not repay this money, the school district may impose sanctions against the public school student as determined by school district policy.

Districts may be eligible for a supplemental incentive payment to support student participation in PSEO PEOA or the Career and Technical Preparation Act.  Supplemental incentive payments are calculated in two parts:

Part 1:   $10.00 per credit, up to three credits ($30 maximum), for a credit-bearing course in which a pupil enrolls during the current school year

Part 2:   An additional payment of $30.00 per-pupil per course (regardless of the number of credits) if the pupil successfully completes and is awarded both high school and postsecondary credit for the course.

Incentive payments are included in the final (August) State Aid payment each year.

Supplemental incentive payments for supporting postsecondary opportunities for students remain available in 2018-19. A maximum of $60 per course can be claimed.  Incentive payments are limited to one course per student, per year, and will be included in districts’ August state school aid payments following claim processing and course verification.
M.C.L.A. 388.514(5) and (6), 388.1904(5) and (6), M.C.L.A. 388.514 (9)(b) and (10)(b), 388.1904(9)(b) and (10)(b) "For a district to be eligible": 2015 H.B. 4115, sec. 64b 
Minnesota Postsecondary Enrollment Options: Local decision. The agreement between a board and the governing body of a public postsecondary system or private postsecondary institution sets forth the payment amounts and arrangements, if any, from the board to the postsecondary institution. For a student earning both high school and postsecondary credit, or just high school credit, the state pays (office of education). The state uses the following formula to reimburse colleges/universities: 88% of the product of the formula allowance minus $425, multiplied by 1.2 and divided by 30 for institutions on a semester calendar, or divided by 45 for institutions on a quarter calendarAn institution may not charge a student enrolled in a course for secondary and postsecondary credit for fees, textbooks, materials, support services, or other necessary costs, except for equipment purchased by the student that becomes the property of the student. The department must not make payments to a postsecondary institution for a course from which a student officially withdraws during the first 14 days of the quarter or semester or who has been absent from the postsecondary institution for the first 15 consecutive school days of the quarter or semester and is not receiving instruction in the home or hospital.

For a student taking a course for postsecondary credit only, or for any postsecondary courses in which a student is enrolled in addition to being enrolled full time in the student’s district: the student or parent is responsible for tuition, fees, textbooks, and materials.

Concurrent Enrollment: The actual costs school districts must pay are determined by local agreements between districts and postsecondary partners. If the course is taught by a secondary instructor, the postsecondary institution may not require payment that exceeds the cost to the postsecondary institution that is directly attributable to providing that course.

Districts must receive from the state up to $150 per student enrolled in a concurrent enrollment course; however, this is based on a fixed annual state appropriation. If the appropriation does not cover the full $150 per student, the district covers the balance.
Minn. Stat. Ann. § 124D.09, subd. 13 and 19 
Mississippi Both programs: Local decision. Tuition and other costs may be paid by the postsecondary institution, the school district, the student/parent, or by grants, foundations or other private or public sources. Tuition and costs for university-level courses must be paid from grants, foundations, or other private sources. Miss. Code Ann. § 37-15-38(5) Miss. Admin. Code 9-1-1:1.0 Miss. Admin. Code 9-1-1:3.0
Missouri Local decision. Local agreement between student’s district and the college or university determines whether tuition is paid by the student’s district or by student/parent. Institutions are prohibited from using fees as a means of enticing school districts or competing with other institutions for dual credit students. Institutions must charge reasonable fees for providing dual credit courses.

For the purpose of payment of dual credit course fees under the Missouri Fee Payment Program, eligible students must be enrolled in an approved course, and have scored either proficient or advanced on the same content area section of the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP) test. The department of elementary and secondary education must establish a systematic process for identifying and reporting the names of students eligible for aid to pay a portion of the cost of dual credit course fees, and an evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the program and the program's impact on participating students.
1: Mo. Ann. Stat. §167.223(4); Section 5.7 of CBHE Dual Credit Policy, June 3, 2015 2: Mo. Code Regs. Ann., tit. 5, 20-100.120
Montana Combination of state and student/parent. In fall 2018, the Montana University System launched One-Two-Free, an initiative under which students who meet dual enrollment eligibility requirements may enroll in two tuition-free dual enrollment courses at a participating Montana University System college. Once a student has completed courses made available at no tuition cost through One-Two-Free, the student/parent pays the course tuition, unless another arrangement is made between the school board, a private foundation, grants, or other sources. Currently, GEAR UP districts provide tuition support (often full) to dual enrollment students. Some TRiO programs in the state have similar support programs in place. All Montana University System Colleges have a common tuition approach for dually enrolled students, established by a Directive from Montana’s Commissioner of Higher Education. After utilizing the free courses available via the One-Two-Free program, students pay 50% of the resident 2-year tuition rate with no mandatory and non-mandatory fees, except for course fees (where applicable). Commissioner's Directive on Early College Student Tuition and Ineligibility for Board Designated Waivers
Nebraska Not set in state policy

The Access College Early Scholarship Program (ACE) provides low-income students with financial assistance for courses taken in high school for postsecondary credit. A "career program of study" is defined as a sequence of at least three high school courses that:
  • may include dual-credit or college credit courses
  • are part of a career pathway program of study aligned with State Department of Education rules and regulations, (ii) a professional certification requirement, or (iii) the requirements for a postsecondary certification or diploma, and
  • have at least one local member of business or industry partnering as an official advisor to the program.
Access College Early Scholarship Program applications must be prioritized for students whose parents meet certain criteria of need or who have experienced extreme hardship. State law permits non-high-need students pursuing a career plan of study to be considered for awards if funds are available after applications have been fulfilled for high-need students. Under these provisions, non-high-need students may request assistance to cover the cost of tuition and fees for a course that is part of a career plan of study, up to $250 per term, and the student's family has an annual household income at or below 200% of the federal poverty level.

In addition, the Nebraska Dual Enrollment Standards, which serve as guidelines but do not have the force of law, provide: "School districts and postsecondary education institutions should work together to ensure broad access to dual enrollment courses for all students, irrespective of the students’ financial resources. Postsecondary education institutions are encouraged to offer tuition remissions or find other means of support for eligible students qualifying for free or reduced lunches or otherwise demonstrating financial need.

"School districts that receive state aid related in part to significant numbers of students challenged by poverty or English language limitations should consider using such aid or finding other means of support to fund the tuition expenses of eligible students who would not otherwise be able to enroll in dual enrollment courses." 
Neb. Rev. Stat. § 85-2103; 85–2102(1); 85–2104
Nevada Generally: Student/parent.

Dual credit cooperative agreements must include an explanation of the manner in which the tuition for each dual credit course will be paid. Such agreements must include an explanation of the manner in which the tuition for the dual credit course will be paid, including whether:

(1) The school district or charter school will pay all or a portion of the tuition for the dual credit course;
(2) A pupil is responsible for paying all or a portion of the tuition for the dual credit course;
(3) Grants from the Department are available and will be applied to pay all or a portion of the tuition for the dual credit course; and
(4) Any other funding source, including federal funding sources or sources from private entities, will be applied by the school district or charter school to pay all or a portion of the tuition for the dual credit course;

NSHE institutions may offer programs and courses, including but not limited to distance education and early and/or dual enrollment courses/programs, to high school students at a registration fee appropriate to cover at least the costs of the course or program, including but not limited to the instructor’s salary, supplies and equipment needed, and appropriate overhead costs. The registration fee must be approved by the President. Institutions must report biennially to the Board on the programs offered, the number of high school students served, and the approved registration fees charged.

Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 389.310 Board of Regents Handbook, Title 4, Chapter 16, Section 2(3)
New Hampshire The state pays up to $250 to the CCSNH institution where a high school or career and technical education student successfully completes an approved course and the CCSNH is required to accept such amount as full payment for course tuition.The state pays tuition for up to two STEM or STEM related courses in grade 11 and two STEM or STEM related courses in grade 12. Students are responsible for tuition if they exceed that number of courses per year. N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §188-E:27
New Jersey Not set in state policy. However, a dual enrollment agreement between a school district and public postsecondary institution must include a provision ensuring an eligible student is not excluded from participation because of an inability to pay.

The governor's approved FY 2019 budget includes $1 million to support College Readiness Now (CRN) program grants for low-income students who are not college ready, through participation in Bridge courses; some participating community colleges will also offer the opportunity for CRN students to participate dual enrollment at no cost to the students.
N.J. Stat. § 18A:61C-10(d)(2) FY 2019 Budget Bill
New Mexico State. The higher education institution must waive tuition and general fees for dual credit students (students are responsible for course-specific fees, i.e., lab, computer fees). The funding formula in place to allocate funds to the public institutions of higher education bases the allocation on the number of credit hours completed and reported to the higher education department. There is a lag of a year or more because the funds are allocated during the January-February legislative session.

The tribal college dual credit program fund consists of legislative appropriations; grants, gifts, donations, and bequests for the dual credit program; and earnings on monies in the fund. Funds may be used only by the higher education department to compensate tribal colleges for tuition and fees waived to allow high school students to attend classes on the college campus or electronically. If sufficient appropriations are received, the tribal colleges will be fully reimbursed for all dual credit tuition and fees. If the legislative appropriation is inadequate to fully reimburse each of the tribal colleges for the full amount of the tuition and fees expended to provide dual credit, the department will offer the presidents of the tribal colleges or their designees the opportunity to select another method of reimbursement. In the event of an inadequate appropriation, the department will honor a fair and equitable alternative method of distribution of the reimbursement only if the method is agreed upon by all the tribal colleges pursuant to a memorandum of agreement. If the tribal colleges cannot agree unanimously upon a fair and equitable distribution of an inadequate appropriation for dual credit tuition and fees, the department will develop a formula that fairly distributes the appropriation. The department's formula will be distributed to the colleges for review and comment before any distribution is made. However, in the event of disagreement, the department's determination of a distribution method is the final determination. 
p1: N.M. Stat. Ann. 6.30.7.8 p2: statute, N.M. Admin. Code 5.55.2
New York There is no formal dual enrollment policy, so tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.
North Carolina State. The general assembly reimburses FTE costs to the community college system based on participation reports. All curriculum courses taken by Career and College Promise students at community colleges are tuition-waived except courses offered on a self-supporting basis.

Responsibility for textbook costs is locally determined. Textbook costs are the student's responsibility unless a student's high school, school district, or another organization covers these costs. Student fees (e.g., technology fees, insurance fees) are not waived for Career and College Promise students. However, school districts and community colleges should work together to determine whether and how student fees will be paid for participating students.
Correspondence with NC Community Colleges
North Dakota Student/parent.  Student or parent also responsible for all fees, textbooks, materials, equipment, and other necessary charges related to the course in which the student has enrolled. NDCC, 15.1-25-03
Ohio District

"Standard rate" is defined as the amount per credit hour the college charges an in-state student not participating in College Credit Plus program and enrolled in an undergraduate course, as prescribed by the college's established tuition policy.

For each public or nonpublic school participant enrolled in a public college, if no agreement has been entered into establishing an alternative payment structure for tuition, textbooks, and fees, the department pays the college: 
  • For a participant enrolled in a college course delivered on the college campus, at another location operated by the college, or online, the default ceiling amount
  • For a participant enrolled in a college course delivered at the participant's secondary school but taught by college faculty, 50% of the default ceiling amount
  • For a participant enrolled in a college course delivered at the participant's secondary school and taught by a high school teacher, the default floor amount.
Statute establishes a formula establishing the default ceiling amount for participants enrolling in colleges on a quarter or a semester schedule, and sets the default floor amount as 25% of the default ceiling amount. The participant's secondary school pays for textbooks and course materials, and the college waives payment of all other fees related to program participation.

For a nonpublic secondary school participant or home-instructed participant, the department pays state funds only if that participant is awarded funding according to rules adopted by the chancellor of higher education.

Alternative payment structure for public or nonpublic school participant enrolled in a public college: The governing entity of a participant's secondary school and the college may enter into an agreement to establish an alternative payment structure for tuition, textbooks, and fees. Under such an agreement, payments for each participant made by the department must be not less than the default floor amount, unless approved by the chancellor, and not more than the default ceiling amount. The chancellor must approve an agreement that includes a payment below the default floor amount, as long as the provisions of the agreement comply with all other requirements of this chapter to ensure program quality.

No participant enrolled in a public college may be charged for any tuition, textbooks, or other fees related to program participation. No school district may charge a student an additional fee or tuition for participation in any advanced standing program, including College Credit Plus, although students may be required to pay the costs associated with taking an AP or IB exam.

For each public school participant enrolled in a private college: If no agreement has been entered into, the department pays the college the applicable amount calculated in the same manner as described above for each public or nonpublic secondary school participant enrolled in a public college. 

Alternative payment structure for public school participant enrolled in a private college: The governing entity of a participant's secondary school and the college may enter into an agreement to establish an alternative payment structure for tuition, textbooks, and fees. Under such an agreement, payments may be not less than the default floor amount, unless approved by the chancellor, and not more than the default ceiling amount. If an agreement is entered into, the department must make a payment to the college for each participant that is equal to the default floor amount, unless approved by the chancellor to pay an amount below the default floor amount. The chancellor must approve an agreement that includes a payment below the default floor amount, as long as the provisions of the agreement comply with all other requirements of this chapter to ensure program quality. Payment for costs for the participant that exceed the amount paid by the department must be negotiated by the school and the college. The agreement may include a stipulation permitting the charging of a participant who is not economically disadvantaged. However, under no circumstances may payments made exceed the default ceiling amount, nor may the amount charged a participant exceed the difference between the maximum per participant charge amount and the default floor amount, nor the sum of the payments made by the department for a participant and the amount charged to that participant exceed the maximum per participant charge amount for a course delivered by postsecondary faculty on the college campus, or exceed $125 for a course delivered by college faculty at the student’s secondary school, or exceed $100 for a course taught by a high school teacher. 

Under no circumstances may a participant identified as economically disadvantaged be charged for any tuition, textbooks, or other fees related to program participation.

For each nonpublic school participant enrolled in a private or eligible out-of-state college: The department pays the college the applicable amount calculated in the same manner as described above for each public or nonpublic secondary school participant enrolled in a public college Payment for costs for the participant that exceed the amount paid by the department must be negotiated by the governing body of the nonpublic secondary school and the college. . However, under no circumstances may payments made exceed the default ceiling amount, nor may any nonpublic secondary school participant who has a scholarship awarded under the educational choice scholarship pilot program, or the pilot project scholarship program, and who qualifies as a low-income student under either of those programs, be charged for any tuition, textbooks, or other fees related to program participation. 

For each nonchartererd nonpublic school participant and each home-instructed participant enrolled in a public, private, or eligible out-of-state college: The department pays the college the default ceiling amount, if that participant is enrolled in a college course delivered on the college campus, at another location operated by the college, or online. 

For all enrollment scenarios: Not later than 30 days after the end of each term, each college expecting to receive payment for participant costs must notify the department of the number of enrolled credit hours for each participant. Each January and July, or as soon as possible thereafter, the department makes the applicable payments to each college that provided proper notification to the department for participants’ enrolled credit hours. The department may not make any payments to a college if a participant withdrew from a course prior to the date on which a withdrawal from the course would have negatively affected the participant's transcripted grade, as prescribed by the college's established withdrawal policy. 

For nonpublic and homeschooled students: Payments made for nonpublic secondary school participants, nonchartered nonpublic secondary school participants, and home-instructed participants must be deducted from moneys appropriated by the general assembly for such purpose. Payments must be allocated and distributed in accordance with rules adopted by the chancellor of higher education. The rules must include that payments made for nonchartered nonpublic secondary school participants be made in the same manner as payments for home-instructed participants. 

However, if a public school student earns a non-passing grade, the district superintendent or equivalent may seek reimbursement from the participant or the participant's parent for the amount of state funds paid to the college on the participant’s behalf for that college course. A public school’s governing entity may withhold grades and credits received by the participant for high school courses taken by the participant until the participant or the participant's parent provides reimbursement. A nonpublic school administrator may likewise seek reimbursement of state funds from a student or parent of a student who earns a non-passing grade. Upon collecting any funds from a nonpublic school participant or participant's parent, the chief administrator must send an amount equal to the funds collected to the superintendent of public instruction, who must credit that amount to the general revenue fund. A superintendent or chief administrator must not seek reimbursement from a participant or a participant's parent if the participant is economically disadvantaged, unless the student was expelled by the school.
Oklahoma Student/parent, unless the district does not offer enough course selections to allow the student to receive the courses needed to meet the graduation requirements, in which case the district pays tuition, fees, and books for the concurrent enrollment course, and provides transportation.

High school seniors who meet the eligibility requirements for concurrent enrollment are entitled to receive a tuition waiver for a maximum of 18 credit hours per semester. Students receiving a waiver are responsible for fees, books, and supplies. Scholarships are  available to high school students who are concurrently enrolled. Tuition waiver scholarships may also be awarded to students enrolled in on-line courses and other special students.

Statute expresses legislative intent that, for concurrent enrollment courses the district is paying for, the institution charge only the supplementary and special service fees that are directly related to the concurrent enrollment course and enrollment procedures for that student, and that fees for student activities and student service facilities, including the student health care and cultural and recreational service fees, not be charged to such students.
Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 70, §628.13(D)(1) and (2); OK Regents for Higher Education Policy Manual, Section 4.18.5.A.3.k 
Oregon Tuition and/or fee payment varies based upon the program and courses offered. 

Dual Credit: State. The legislature appropriates funds to reimburse FTE costs to institutions based on participation reports; these funds are distributed by the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development. Local decision as to whether students are charged registration/transcription fees.

Expanded Options: Local decision.  Expanded Options programs were developed to ensure “at-risk” student participation in Accelerated College Credit Programs are provided at no cost to the student. Tuition and fees are negotiated between the school district and the postsecondary institution to pay required instructional costs of the student. A student may apply to the resident district for reimbursement for any textbooks, fees, equipment or materials required for a postsecondary course. A postsecondary institution that receives payment through the negotiated financial agreement may not charge a student for tuition, fees and other required instructional costs associated with the student’s enrollment in a course. 

A charter school that elects to participate in the Expanded Options Program must negotiate and pay actual instructional costs associated with student participation directly to the postsecondary institution. 
 
Accelerated College Credit Program Grant: Based on appropriations, Accelerated College Credit Program Grants are awarded on a competitive basis to applicant school districts, educational service districts (as a pass-through to districts), regional consortia, and public postsecondary institutions to support teacher training, instructional materials, and student expenses (other than test fees) related to accelerated learning options (i.e., dual credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and other partnership programs). The Request for Applications (RFA) provides that preference will be given to regions with high poverty rates, large underserved student populations, and that did not already receive funds from a Regional Promise grant.

The department of education must administer a grant program that provides grants to assist students in paying for books, materials and other costs, other than test fees, related to accelerated college credit programs. These grants are available to any Accelerated College Credit program as administered by the local educational agency (school district or postsecondary institution).
Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.045; Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.050 Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.055; Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.073 Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.010(4) Accelerated College Credit Program grant: Or. Rev. Stat. § 340.320
Pennsylvania Combination of student’s district and student/parent. A school entity (district or an area vocational-technical school) pays the portion of total approved costs for which it is provided grants by the department of education, and students/parents pay the remainder. To defray—but not eliminate—district costs for concurrent enrollment students, the department provides grants to applicant school districts with an approved concurrent enrollment program, as well as a supplemental grant amount for an applicant district with a low-income concurrent enrollment student. The supplemental grant amount is equal the cost of tuition, books and fees for which a low-income concurrent student is responsible for a course.

A school entity is not responsible for paying any portion of the total approved costs for any concurrent student enrolled in a charter school, nonpublic or private school, or home education program in excess of the grants provided by the department of education.

*Program currently inactive due to inadequate state funds.*
(24 P.S. § 16-1603-B(c) and (d), 24 P.S. § 16-1611-B(e)
Rhode Island Dual enrollment and concurrent enrollment course costs vary by course and delivery method. Concurrent enrollment course offerings and course costs are to be annually established by postsecondary institutions and approved by the Board of Education.

The 4th year of the Governor's Prepare RI Dual Enrollment Fund (for the 2018-19 school year)  was included in the the FY19 State budget. The Prepare RI Dual Enrollment Fund provides funding for qualified public high school students to take college courses from the state's public higher education institutions as part of their high school requirements at no cost to the student or family. The cost of books and associated course materials is covered by the school or district if the student is taking the course for high school credit.

Districts/LEAs are required to pay for full-time students enrolled in community college. These payments are capped at 50% of core instructional per pupil rates. Board regulations also outline the parameters for allocation of funds in instances where there is a dedicated funding stream for dual enrollment courses. If program participation outpaces dedicated funding, the postsecondary commissioner determines how to allocate available funding to postsecondary institutions. Funding limitations may change institutional policies as to the courses offered but access will not otherwise be limited. 

 
200-RICR-10-00-1 (as revised May 30, 2018)
South Carolina Local decision. Student/parent, unless otherwise specified in local school district policy. S.C. Code Ann. Regs. 43-234(III)(C)
South Dakota Generally: Local decision. Students in grades 9-12 are allowed to take general education college courses as high school credit with students in the 11-12 grades earning college credit through the program. HB 1099 (2018) deleted provisions specifying that the district or the state may cover all or a portion of tuition and fees (district has that ability should it choose to do so, but is no longer codified); and deleted that the student is responsible for paying any tuition/fees not paid by the district or the state, and any other costs. HB 1099 also added a new section (described below) that adds tuition subsidies for 11th-12th graders.

State subsidized high school dual credit (for 11th-12th graders): Student pays subsidized rate of tuition. HB 1099 (2018) added a new section specifying that the Board of Regents is to set the tuition rate equivalent in 43% of the undergraduate off-campus tuition rate. It also added that the student taking the course is to pay an amount equal to 33.3% of the total high school dual credit tuition rate and a school district may pay any portion of the student's share. HB1099 also requires the state to pay an amount equal to 66.7% of the total high school dual credit tuition rate and prohibited any public institution of higher education or postsecondary technical institution offering the credit from requiring additional fees. The student, however, is responsible for any other costs involved with attending a postsecondary institution. (Undergraduate off-campus tuition is defined as the per-credit rate, as set by the Board of Regents, that was in effect on January first of the previous fiscal year. 

The South Dakota Department of Education will reimburse Board of Regents institutions at two times the rate established in the BOR Tuition and Fee Schedule. This rate is prorated per Board of Regents policy for courses resulting in "W" grades prior to the 60% date established in the academic calendar.

Concurrent Enrollment: $40 per credit hour (starting fall 2016, $48.33 per credit hour), if course is offered through the Externally Supported tuition rate (requires approval by the System Vice President for Academic Affairs). Students are expected to cover all instructional costs, including course materials, texts, and related instructional supplies. Student textbooks may be provided by the high school per local school/district policy. No additional course level fees (i.e., lab fees, program fees, discipline fees, laptop fees, delivery fees, etc.) may be assessed to students enrolled in concurrent enrollment coursework.

Campus Enrollment: High school juniors or seniors may enroll in regularly scheduled courses on campus, state sponsored centers, approved off-campus locations, or online on a space available basis. Students pay full-tuition rate and applicable fees.
Generally and state subsidized: South Dakota Codified Laws § 13-28-37 Concurrent Enrollment, Campus Enrollment: Dual/Concurrent Credit Administration Guidelines, (last rev. 12/2017)
Tennessee If a program is funded through local, state or federal funds appropriated to an LEA, then no fee may be charged by the LEA or a public postsecondary institution to any student participating in the program.

A "dual enrollment grant" is defined as a grant for study at an eligible postsecondary institution that is funded from net proceeds of the state lottery and awarded to students who are attending high school and who are also enrolled in college courses at eligible postsecondary institutions for which they will receive college credit.

A dual enrollment grant, funded from net proceeds of the state lottery, is available to an 11th or 12th grader who is not ineligible for a state lottery-funded grant, has been a Tennessee resident for at least one year, before the grant application date, is admitted to an eligible postsecondary institution as a dual enrollment student, and completes the Dual Enrollment Grant Application. The student must submit the Dual Enrollment Grant application each academic year.

A student receiving a dual enrollment grant may enroll for 1 course per semester at an eligible postsecondary institution. Courses attempted as a dual enrollment student do not count toward the limitation on the receipt of a HOPE scholarship. To be eligible for a dual enrollment grant for a semester beyond the first semester of receipt, the student must continue to meet all eligibility requirements for the grant and achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 for all postsecondary courses attempted under a dual enrollment grant. However, if a student is a junior or senior, is receiving a dual enrollment grant, and has either (1) qualified academically for a Tennessee HOPE scholarship by earning the required composite ACT score or the equivalent SAT score, or (2) achieved an overall weighted GPA of 3.0 for all high school work completed before the semester of enrollment as a dual enrollment student, the student may enroll in two additional courses per semester  at an eligible postsecondary institution as a dual enrollment student. Financial assistance received for this additional course per semester must reduce the amount of any subsequent award of the Tennessee HOPE scholarship on a dollar-per-dollar basis. 

Funding for Tennessee HOPE scholarships, Tennessee HOPE access grants and Wilder-Naifeh technical skills grants take priority over funding for dual enrollment grants.  Subject to the amounts appropriated by the general assembly and any law relating to a shortfall in funds available for postsecondary financial assistance from the net proceeds of the state lottery, the award for a credit hour taken under a dual enrollment grant shall be determined by TSAC and must not exceed the cost per credit hour of courses taken at community colleges in the state university and community college system. 
4-902(9), -930 Tenn. Code Ann. § 49-4-930; TN Public Act 2017, Ch.471, Comp. R. & Regs. 1640-01-19-.11(4), (5) Tenn. Comp. R. & Regs. 1640-01-19-.14(7) 
Texas Local decision. Higher education institutions and junior colleges with which a district has entered into an agreement may waive all or a portion of tuition and fees. If the institution does not provide a waiver, tuition is the responsibility of the student/parent.

To meet the requirement that districts offer the equivalent of at least 12 credit hours of college credit in high school, a district may provide the opportunity to earn credit for a course or activity, including an apprenticeship or training hours, that is approved by the higher education coordinating board, satisfies a requirement for earning an industry-recognized credential or certificate or an associate degree, and for which a student may earn credit toward both the student's high school diploma and postsecondary academic requirements. A district is not required to pay a student’s tuition or other associated costs for taking a course under these provisions. 

Tuition and fees must be waived for a dual credit student under the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services, or for a student who exits the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services and is returned to his/her parent. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board must develop outreach programs to ensure that eligible students in grades 9-12 are aware of the availability of this exemption from tuition and fees.
Tex. Educ. Code Ann. § 54.216, 130.008(b) Tex. Educ. Code Ann. § 28.009(a-1), (a-2) Tex. Educ. Code Ann. § 54.366
Utah The State Board of Regents or an institution of higher education may not charge a student tuition for a concurrent enrollment course. However, they may charge a one-time admission application fee and/or partial tuition (no more than $30 per credit hour for a course for which a student earns college credit).
An institution of higher education may not charge more than:
  • $5 per credit hour for an eligible student who qualifies for free or reduced price school lunch;
  • $10 per credit hour for a concurrent enrollment course that is taught at an LEA by an eligible instructor;
  • $15 per credit hour for a concurrent enrollment course that is taught through video conferencing.
The State Board of Education is required to allocate money appropriated for concurrent enrollment in proportion to the number of credit hours earned for courses taken where:
  • an LEA primarily bears the cost of instruction (60% of the money allocated goes to LEAs; 40% of the money goes to the State Board of Regents); and
  • an institution of higher education primarily bears the cost of instruction (in this case, 40% of the money goes to LEAs; 60% of the money goes to the State Board of Regents).
Subject to budget constraints, the Legislature must annually increase the money appropriated for concurrent enrollment in proportion to the percentage increase over the previous school year in kindergarten through grade 12 student enrollment; and the value of the weighted pupil unit.

Utah Navajo Trust Fund (UNTF): UNTF higher education scholarship funding is available to eligible San Juan County, Utah, Navajo students for studies at institutions of their choice. Concurrent Enrollment Program students must meet the eligibility criteria regarding all requirements for the UNTF Higher Education Scholarship & Financial Assistance Program with the following modifications:
  • Applicants must provide a letter of recommendation from his/her high school counselor or school officials for concurrent enrollment program participation. The letter should address the student's ability to meet the demands of concurrent enrollment.
  • Students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA in their high school studies to be eligible for this program.
  • The maximum amount of UNTF assistance available annually is determined by the UNTF Board. The UNTF assistance can be increased by the UNTF Board of Directors based on the Utah colleges cost data that is maintained by the State of Utah Department of Education.
Utah Code Ann. § 53E-10-305 Utah Code Ann. § 53F-2-409 UNTF: Utah Admin. Code R. 661-6-101(2), 661-6-301(5)
Vermont An eligible student may enroll in up to 2 dual enrollment courses for which the student/parent are not required to pay tuition. The state pays tuition, and the tuition rate is equal to 20% or 90% of Community College of Vermont rate depending on whether course is taught by a secondary or postsecondary instructor. The state pays 50% of tuition from the Next Generation Initiative Fund and 50% for the Education Fund. A school district may enter into a contract to offer dual enrollment through a public or private postsecondary institution that is not affiliated with Vermont State Colleges or the University of Vermont; the institution may be in or out of state. A district may negotiate terms different from those set forth in statute, including the amount of tuition to be paid.
 
Once a district has paid for two courses, the student/parent is responsible for tuition. A school district may choose to pay for more than two courses per eligible student, but the state will not pay 100% of tuition for those additional courses.
 
2015 H.B. 490 provides for $72,000 to be transferred to the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) to fund a flat-rate, need-based stipend or voucher program for financially needy students enrolled in a dual enrollment course or in early college to be used for the purchase of books, cost of transportation, and payment of fees.
Provision directs the VSAC to establish program eligibility criteria, and to report on the program to House and Senate Committees on Education and Appropriations by January 15, 2016.
16 V.S.A. § 944(b)(2), 16 V.S.A. § 944(f), 16 V.S.A. § 944(g), (16 V.S.A. § 944(h)) Sec. E. 605.1 of the FY 2019 Appropriations Act.
Virginia Local decision. However, under the Governing Principles for Dual Enrollment Between Virginia's Public Schools and the Virginia Community College System, approved summer 2015, full tuition and fees must be paid the community college, but when the course is taught at the high school by a qualified high school faculty member, the minimum amount the community college must reimburse the school division is 60% of tuition charged. Dual enrollment reimbursement rates may be increased up to 100% based on specified options negotiated by the community college and public school division.  Total reimbursement may not exceed 100% of the tuition charged. School divisions may not charge dual enrollment students or their families more than the actual cost of the tuition and fees charged. Reimbursement rates and justifications must be documented in the annual dual enrollment contract between the community college and the school division. 

When courses are not taught by high school faculty members, the community college may, in order to reduce the net cost to students, reimburse the school division a portion of tuition in recognition of agreed-to contributions of resources provided by the school division.

Any high school student not otherwise qualified for in-state tuition who is enrolled in community college courses for high school and community college credit pursuant to a dual enrollment agreement between the high school and community college must be charged at the Virginia in-state rate.
p1-3: Governing Principles for Dual Enrollment Between Virginia's Public Schools and the Virginia Community College System, 2015
Washington Running Start: Combination of state and student/parent, although funds paid by the state through districts are not deemed tuition or operating fees. The superintendent of public instruction allocates funds appropriated for basic education to school districts for purposes of making payments to postsecondary institutions, and for granting school districts 7% thereof to offset program related costs. Each participating district transmits to the institution of higher education an amount per each full-time equivalent college student at statewide uniform rates for vocational and nonvocational students. The superintendent of public instruction, participating institutions of higher education, and the state board for community and technical colleges must consult on the calculation and distribution of the funds.

At community or technical colleges, in lieu of tuition and fees, students pay all other mandatory fees. The state board for community and technical colleges may authorize a fee of up to 10% of tuition and fees. All other institutions of higher education may charge students a fee of up to 10% of tuition and fees, in addition to technology fees, in lieu of tuition and fees. In both instances, fees must be prorated based on credit load.

Students may pay fees with advanced college tuition payment program tuition units at a rate set by the advanced college tuition payment program governing body.

Institutions must make fee waivers available to low-income students, and establish written policies to determine low-income students before offering the fee waiver. Institutions must make every effort to communicate to students and their families the benefits of the waivers and provide assistance to students and their families on how to apply. Information about waivers must, to the greatest extent possible, be incorporated into financial aid counseling, admission information, and individual billing statements. Institutions also must, to the greatest extent possible, use all means of communication, including websites, online catalogues, admission and registration forms, mass e-mail messaging, social media, and outside marketing to ensure that information about waivers is visible, compelling, and reaches the maximum number of eligible students and families.

In 2018, the joint legislative audit and review committee must complete a systematic performance audit of the tuition-setting authority granted to the governing boards of four-year public institutions of higher education, in order to evaluate the impact of institutional tuition-setting authority on student access, affordability, and institutional quality. The audit must include an evaluation of the various outcomes for each four-year institution of higher education, including changes in enrollments in the Running Start and other dual enrollment programs. The audit must also include recommendations on whether to continue tuition-setting authority beyond the 2018-19 academic year. In conducting the audit, the auditor must solicit input from key higher education stakeholders, including students and their families.

College in the High School: Local decision. The institution of higher education may charge tuition to participating students. However, legislation permits, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this purpose, funding to be allocated at an amount per college credit for 11th and 12th grade students. The maximum annual number of allocated credits per participating student must be specified in the omnibus appropriations act, up to 10 credits. Funding must be prioritized first for high schools offering a Running Start in the High School program in the 2014-2015 school year (such schools receive prioritized funding in the 2015-2016 school year); then students whose residence or high school is ? 20 driving miles from the nearest eligible postsecondary institution offering a Running Start program; then high schools eligible for the small school funding enhancement in the omnibus appropriations act. After such programs are funded, a subsidy may be provided 11th and 12th graders eligible for free or reduced-price lunch who are enrolled in College in the High School courses. The maximum annual number of subsidized credits per participating student must be specified in the omnibus appropriations act, and may not exceed five credits. Districts wishing to participate in the subsidy program must annually apply to the office of the superintendent of public instruction and report the preliminary estimate of eligible students to receive the subsidy and the total number of projected credit hours. If more districts apply than funding is available, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must prioritize the district applications, and the superintendent must develop factors to determine priority including the number of dual credit opportunities available for low-income students in the districts.
1: RCW 28A.600.310(4) 2: RCW 28A.600.310 (2)(a)(i),(ii) and (b) 3: RCW 28A.600.310(2)(c) 4: 28A.600.310(3) 5: 44.28.816(1), (2)(e), (3), (4) 6: RCW 28A.600.290
West Virginia All programs: Student/parent, district or 3rd party

Dual Credit: In practice, varies from county to county – some counties pay the tuition; in other counties the student pays the tuition; however the tuition is at a reduced cost.

West Virginia EDGE: Postsecondary institution

Early Enrollment: Student/parent. However, to increase access, an institution may use a special tuition structure for high school students, which must be set at at least $25.00 per credit hour. All high school students must be charged the special tuition or the regular tuition/fees approved for the institution granting the credit. The credit-granting institution may use tuition/fee waivers or third party sponsors to support the student's cost of the course.
Early enrollment: W. Va. Code R. § 135-19-7, 133-19-7 Other responses from WV to WV profile
Wisconsin Start College Now: For a course taken for high school credit   and deemed not comparable to courses offered in the school district: District. The school board pays the technical college board resident tuition, course fees and books. A pupil taking a course at a technical college for high school credit is not responsible for any portion of the tuition and fees for the course if the school board is required to pay the technical college.

For a course taken for postsecondary credit only, or courses taken for high school credit and deemed comparable to courses offered in the school district: Student/parent

If the participating student is a child with a disability, as defined in s. 115.76(5), the payment must be adjusted to reflect the cost of any special services required for the pupil.

Early College Credit Program: Tuition amounts and responsible parties vary depending on the institution offering the course, whether the course is being taken for high school (or high school and postsecondary) credit or postsecondary credit only, and whether the course is deemed comparable to a course offered in the school district or private school.

For a course taken for high school credit and deemed not comparable to a course offered in the school district or private school, regardless of whether the course is also taken for postsecondary credit: District or private school pays 75% of the actual cost of tuition (see “Actual cost of tuition” below).  Districts and private schools are reimbursed 25% of tuition paid, through an appropriation that is prorated for all recipients if inadequate to cover all costs.

If a course taken for high school credit is offered at the high school or private school, the district or private school governing body is responsible for the costs of books and other necessary materials for the course.

For a course taken for postsecondary credit only and deemed not comparable to courses offered in the school district or private school: District or private school pays 25% of the actual cost of tuition for the course and student pays 25% of the actual cost of tuition (see “Actual cost of tuition” below). 

Districts and private school governing boards must establish written policies governing the timing and method for recovering from the pupil or the pupil's parent or guardian the pupil's share of tuition. The school board or private school governing body must waive the student’s responsibility for costs if the pupil is eligible for free or reduced price lunch.

Districts and private schools are reimbursed 50% of tuition paid, through an appropriation that is prorated for all recipients if inadequate to cover all costs.

“Actual cost of tuition”: The tuition charged for each credit assigned to the course may not exceed, for:
  • A 4-year institution within the University of Wisconsin system or a tribally controlled college: One-third of the undergraduate resident tuition that would otherwise be charged for the course.
  • A University of Wisconsin 2-year college campus: One-half of the undergraduate resident tuition that would otherwise be charged for the course.
  • Private, nonprofit institution: One-third of the amount that would be charged a Wisconsin resident undergraduate for a similar course offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 
If in any fiscal year the appropriation under 20.445(1)(d) is insufficient to reimburse all districts and governing bodies eligible for a reimbursement, the amount of the reimbursement must be prorated for all eligible districts and governing boards.

If the district is required to pay tuition for a course taken for high school or postsecondary credit that is not comparable to a course offered in the district, neither the institution/campus nor the school board may charge a pupil any additional costs or fees to attend a course. (The private school governing board may not charge a pupil any additional costs or fees to attend a course offered by a 4-year University of Wisconsin institution or a tribal college.)

In addition, a pupil taking a course at an institution of higher education for high school credit is not responsible for any portion of the tuition and fees for the course if local or state authorities determine that the course is not comparable to a course offered in the school district or at the participating private school.

For a course taken for high school credit and deemed comparable to courses offered in the school district or private school: Student is responsible for tuition and fees.

Early College Credit Program: If a pupil receives a failing grade in a course, or fails to complete a course, at an institution of higher education or technical college for which the school board or the governing body of a participating private school has made payment, the pupil's parent or guardian, or the pupil if he or she is an adult, shall reimburse the school board or the governing body the amount paid on the pupil's behalf upon the request of the school board or governing body. If a school board or governing body that requests reimbursement of a payment made under this section is not reimbursed as requested, the pupil on whose behalf the payment was made is ineligible for any further participation in the program under this section. For the purposes of this paragraph, a grade that constitutes a failing grade for a course offered in the school district or at the participating private school constitutes a failing grade for a course taken at an institution of higher education or technical college under this section.

Other dual enrollment at University of Wisconsin System institutions: The school board of a common or union high school district must pay the tuition of any pupil enrolled in the school district and attending an institution within the University of Wisconsin System if the pupil is not participating in the Early College Credit Program, the course the pupil is attending at the university is not offered in the school district and the pupil will receive high school credit for the course.
Start College Now: W.S.A. 38.12(14)(d), (dm), (f)
 
Early College Credit Program: W.S.A. 118.55(5), (6); Wis. Adm. Code § PI 40.04
 
Both programs: W.S.A. 118.55(7t)(c)
 
Other dual enrollment at University of Wisconsin System institutions: W.S.A. 120.12(17)
Wyoming Student's district. A postsecondary institution may not assess any fee from the participating student for textbooks, materials, student services or any other fees otherwise assessed and collected from students attending the institution. W.S.1977 § 21-20-201(d)

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