Civic Education Policies: State standards include civics or citizenship education

Civic Education Policies: State standards include civics or citizenship education

December 2016


Data are collected using publicly available state statute, administrative code and, in some cases, curriculum and standards frameworks. A profile was sent to each state for review and modification, as needed.
 

Alabama The Alabama Social Studies Course of Study (grade-level standards) include a strand of standards for civics and government. The goal of the civics and government strand is to “enable students to become informed, responsible participants in political life and to function as competent citizens committed to the fundamental values and principles of the constitutional democracy that established the republic of the United States of America.” While the civics and government strand is embedded in each grade level, students in Grade 7 concentrate on the area of civics during the instructional year, and Grade 12 students focus on United States government.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying rights and responsibilities of citizens within the family, classroom, school and community (Kindergarten), recognizing functions of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution (grade 3), describing individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States and determining ways to participate in the political process (grade 7), and describing the process of local, state, and national elections, including the organization, role, and constituency of political parties (grade 12).
Alabama Course of Study (2010)

http://alex.state.al.us/staticfiles/2010_AL_Social_Studies_Course_of_Study.pdf
Alaska Alaska’s Government and Citizenship Content Standards (not grade-level standards) are divided into seven central themes, one of which is having “the knowledge and skills necessary to participate effectively as an informed and responsible citizen.” Sample standards/benchmarks include: knowing and understanding how societies define authority, rights, and responsibilities through a governmental process and having the knowledge and skills necessary to participate effectively as an informed and responsible citizen.

Alaska's History Performance Standards (not grade-level standards) are divided into four central themes, one of which is "Individual Citizenship, Governance and Power." Sample standards/benchmarks in this strand include: describing how Alaskans, particularly the Native people and challenge the status quo to gain recognition of their civil rights and identifying the role of Alaska Native individuals and groups in actively proposing and promoting federal legislation and policies.
Alaska Government and Citizenship Standards (2012)

https://education.alaska.gov/akstandards/standards/Government&Citizenship.pdf

Alaska History Performance Standards (2012)

https://education.alaska.gov/akstandards/standards/History_Performance&GLEs.pdf
Arizona Arizona’s Academic Content Standards - Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for civics/government. The goal of the civics strand is for students “to develop the requisite knowledge and skills for informed, responsible participation in public life; to ensure, through instruction, that students understand the essentials, source, and history of the constitutions of the United States and Arizona, American institutions and ideals. Students will understand the foundations, principles, and institutional practices of the United States as a representative democracy and constitutional republic. They will understand the importance of each person as an individual with human and civil rights and our shared heritage in the United States. Students will understand politics, government, and the responsibilities of good citizenship. Citizenship skills include the capacity to influence policies and decisions by clearly communicating interests and the ability to build coalitions through negotiation, compromise, and consensus. In addition, students will learn that the United States influences and is influenced by global interaction.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: practicing examples of democracy in action e.g. voting, making classroom rules (grade 1), describing the importance of citizens being actively involved in the democratic process e.g. voting, student government, etc. (grade 4), demonstrating the skills and knowledge needed to accomplish public purposes (high school).
Arizona’s Academic Content Standards - Social Studies (2005)

https://cms.azed.gov/home/GetDocumentFile?id=550c589faadebe15d072aa26
Arkansas The Arkansas Social Studies Curriculum Framework (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) includes a strand of standards for civics/government for grades K-6. In grades 7 and 8, civics content is “embedded” in social studies content. High school students are required to take a one semester civics course prior to graduation and can enroll in a U.S. government elective. The one semester civics course required in high school has three strands (“Civic and Political Institutions”, “Participation and Deliberation and Processes”, “Rules and Laws”) and focuses on “the application of civic virtues and democratic principles and investigation of problem solving in society.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: describing the roles and responsibilities of individuals in a democracy (2grade 2), comparing ways in which various civilizations foster social responsibility and civic virtues (grade 6), and analyzing the election process in federal, state, and local governments (high school Civics).
Social Studies Curriculum Framework Documents (2015)

http://www.arkansased.gov/divisions/learning-services/curriculum-and-instruction/curriculum-framework-documents/social-studies-new-courses-valid-july-1-2015

Outline of Social Studies Content by Grade and Subject Area

http://www.arkansased.gov/public/userfiles/Learning_Services/Curriculum%20and%20Instruction/Frameworks/Social_Studies/Outline_of_Social_Studies_Content.pdf
California The History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools (grade-level standards) “emphasize historical narrative, highlight the roles of significant individuals throughout history, and convey the rights and obligations of citizenship.” In kindergarten through grade 3, students are introduced to the basic concepts of civics. Beginning in grade 4, the disciplines are woven together within the standards at each grade. “Students in grade twelve pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American government... The [12th grade] standards represent the culmination of civic literacy as students prepare to vote, participate in community activities, and assume the responsibilities of citizenship.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding that being a good citizen involves acting in certain ways (Kindergarten), understanding the foundation of the American political system and the ways in which citizens participate in it (grade 8), evaluate and take and defend positions on the scope and limits of rights and obligations as democratic citizens, the relationships among them, and how they are secured (grade 12).
History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools (1998)

http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/histsocscistnd.pdf
Colorado The Colorado Social Studies Academic Standards (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for civics. The civics standards are meant to teach “students the complexity of the origins, structure, and functions of government; the rights, roles and responsibilities of ethical citizenship; the importance of law; and the skills necessary to participate in all levels of government.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: analyzing and debating multiple perspectives on an issue (grade 4), comparing how various nations define the rights, responsibilities and roles of citizens (grade 7), researching, formulating positions, and engaging in appropriate civic participation to address local, state, or national issues or policies (high school).
Set of Standards: Social Studies
Colorado Social Studies Academic Standards (2009)

https://www.cde.state.co.us/cosocialstudies/cas-socialstudies-p12-pdf
Connecticut The Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for civics. Civics is a “discipline of focus” in grades Kindergarten-4th and again in high-school through a one semester American Government course requirement. Civics is woven into the curriculum, even in grades where it is not a “discipline of focus.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: applying civic virtues when participating in school settings (grades K-4), explaining specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and officeholders) (grades 6 and 7), and evaluating citizens’ and institutions’ effectiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level (high school Civics and Government).
Connecticut Elementary and Secondary Social Studies Frameworks (2015)

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/board/ssframeworks.pdf
Delaware The Delaware Standards for Social Studies (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for civics. According to the standards document, students “need to comprehend that an essential premise of representative democracy is the willingness of citizens to place a high premium on their own personal responsibility for participation in social decision-making. Students develop the skills which citizens must possess in order to discharge those responsibilities while protecting their rights and the rights of others. The study of civics prepares students to translate their beliefs into actions and their ideas into policies.” The standards are built on four anchor standards: 1.) students will examine the structure and purposes of governments with specific emphasis on constitutional democracy, 2.) students will understand the principles and ideals underlying the American political system, 3.) students will understand the responsibilities, rights, and privileges of United States citizens, and 4.) students will develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective, participatory citizenship.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding that respect for others, their opinions, and their property is a foundation of civil society in the United States (grades K-3), applying the fundamental rights and protections of American citizens guaranteed in the Bill of Rights to everyday situations (grades 4-5), and developing and employing the skills necessary to work with government programs and agencies (grades 9-12).
Delaware Standards for Social Studies (1995)

http://www.doe.k12.de.us/Page/2548
District of Columbia The District of Columbia Social Studies Pre-K through Grade 12 Standards (grade-level standards) “integrate the four major disciplines of history, geography, economics, and politics and government. They are not presented in separate strands, although grade 6 focuses on geography and grade 12 focuses on government, including U.S. and Washington, DC, governments.” The standards identify throughout the grade continuum when “politics and government” are a stressed disciplinary content. According to the standards’ guiding philosophies “devotion to human dignity and freedom, equal rights, justice, the rule of law, civility and truth, tolerance of diversity, mutual assistance, personal and civic responsibility, self-restraint, and self-respect must be taught, learned, and practiced.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying and describing the events or people celebrated during U.S. national holidays and why Americans celebrate them (Kindergarten), describing the rights and responsibilities of citizenship (grade 2), evaluating, taking and defending positions on the scope and limits of rights and obligations as democratic citizens, the relationships among them, and how they are secured (grade 12).
District of Columbia Social Studies Pre-K through Grade 12 Standards (2011)

http://osse.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/osse/publication/attachments/DCPS-horiz-soc_studies.pdf
Florida Florida’s Next Generation Sunshine Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government. According to the Sunshine Standards, over the course of their studies, students should meet the following general standards related to civics and government: 1.) demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system, 2.) evaluate the roles, rights, and responsibilities of United States citizens and determine methods of active participation in society, government, and the political system, 3.) demonstrate an understanding of the principles, functions, and organization of government, and 4.) demonstrate an understanding of contemporary issues in world affairs, and evaluate the role and impact of United States foreign policy.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying ways students can participate in the betterment of their school and community (grade 1), evaluating the importance of civic responsibilities in American democracy (grade 5) and analyzing public policy solutions or courses of action to resolve a local, state, or federal issue (high school).
Next Generation Sunshine Standards (2014)

http://www.cpalms.org/Public/search/Standard#0

Georgia The Social Studies Georgia Standards of Excellence (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Government/Civics in Kindergarten through Grade 8. In their high/school American Government/Civics course students are provided with “a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government, examine the philosophical foundations of the United States government and how that philosophy developed, and examine the structure and function of the United States government and its relationship to states and citizens.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: explaining the importance of Americans sharing certain central democratic beliefs and principles, both personal and civic (grade 3), comparing and contrasting different forms of citizen participation in government (grade 7), and analyzing the difference between involuntary and voluntary participation in civic life (high school American Government/Civics).
Social Studies Georgia Standards of Excellence (2016)

https://www.georgiastandards.org/Georgia-Standards/Documents/Social-Studies-K-12-Georgia-Standards.pdf
Hawaii The Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III (grade-level standards) include a strand of standards for Political Science/Civics: Governance, Democracy and Interaction and for Political Science/Civics: Participation and Citizenship.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the roles, rights (personal, economic, political), and responsibilities of American citizens and exercising them in civic action by: demonstrating own roles and responsibilities in caring for others and the environment (grade 2) by explaining the responsibilities of citizens in a representative democracy (grade 8) and demonstrating the role of a citizen in civic action by selecting a problem, gathering information, proposing a solution, creating an action plan, and showing evidence of implementation (grade 9).
The Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III (2005)

http://165.248.72.55/hcpsv3/files/final_hcpsiii_socialstudies_librarydocs_1.pdf
Idaho The Idaho Content Standards (grade-level standards for K-5, course-specific standards for 6-12) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: building an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities by: identifying individuals who are helpful to people in their everyday lives (grade 1), identifying ways people can monitor and influence the decisions and actions of their state and tribal governments (grade 4), and identifying the ways in which citizens can participate in the political process at the local, state, and national level (high school American Government).
Idaho Content Standards (2009)

http://sde.idaho.gov/academic/standards/
Illinois The Illinois Learning Standards for Social Science (grade-level standards for K-5, grade-cluster standards for middle school and high school) include a strand of standards for Civics. Civics standards are organized around three disciplinary concepts: civic and political institutions, participation and deliberation, and processes, rules and laws.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying core civic virtues (such as honesty, mutual respect, cooperation, and attentiveness to multiple perspectives) and democratic principles (such as equality, freedom, liberty, respect for individual rights) that guide the state and nation (grade 4), comparing the means by which individuals and groups change societies, promote the common good, and protect rights (middle school), and evaluating the opportunities and limitations of participation in elections, voting, and the electoral process (high school).
Illinois Learning Standards for Social Science (2016)

http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ils/social_science/pdf/ss-stds-eff012716.pdf
Indiana The Indiana Academic Standards - Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government in grades K-8. Civics content is embedded in the United States Government high school course required for graduation and recommended for students in grades 11 or 12.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: explaining the importance of being a responsible citizen of one’s community, the state and the nation and identifying people in one’s community and the state who exhibit the characteristics of good citizenship (grade 3), and explaining the idea of citizenship in the United States, describing the roles of United States citizens, identifying and explaining the rights and responsibilities of United States citizens, and examining how citizens can participate responsibly and effectively in the civic and political life of the United States (high school United States Government).
Indiana Academic Standards - Social Studies (2014)

http://www.doe.in.gov/standards/social-studies
Iowa The Iowa Core K-12 Social Studies standards (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for Political Science/Civic Literacy. According to the standards, students should become “motivated to participate in civic and community life as active and informed citizens...Engaging students in the pursuit of active informed citizenship will require a broad range of understandings and skills. It will also require an articulated curriculum which connects students to the social world through informed instructional experiences led by teachers who are committed to active civic participation.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the rights and responsibilities of each citizen and demonstrating the value of lifelong civic action by: understanding participation in civic and political life can help bring about the attainment of individual and public goals (by the end of grade 8) and understanding that constitutional democracy requires the participation of an attentive, knowledgeable, and competent citizenry (by the end of grade 12).
Iowa Core K-12 Social Studies (2010)

https://iowacore.gov/sites/default/files/k-12_socialstudies.pdf

https://iowacore.gov/iowa-core/subject/social-studies/k/political-science%E2%80%93civic-literacy
Kansas The Kansas State Standards for History Government and Social Studies provide grade-level standards for K-8 and course-specific standards for high school. The standards include the following five standards for all grades and courses: 1. Choices have consequences, 2. Individuals have rights and responsibilities, 3. Societies are shaped by beliefs, ideas, and diversity, 4. Societies experience continuity and change over time, and 5. Relationships among people, places, ideas, and environments are dynamic. Though each standard is supported by four benchmarks, the benchmarks are not grade-level or course-specific. However, the document provides grade-level and course-specific instructional guides (a “suggested scope and sequence” for curriculum progression). Though civics is embedded throughout, the standards recommend Civics/Government as a unit in Grades K-4, Civic Rights and Social Change as a unit in United States History (high school), and multiple civics units in United States Government (high school). The goal of the standards is to “prepare students to be informed, thoughtful, engaged citizens as they enrich their communities, state, nation, world, and themselves.” Emphasis is “placed on the ‘doing’ of social studies rather than simple acquisition of content knowledge.”

Sample benchmarks include: recognizing and evaluating the rights and responsibilities of people living in societies, investigating specific rights and responsibilities of individuals and connecting those rights and responsibilities with contemporary issues, and using his/her understanding of rights and responsibilities to address contemporary issues.
The Kansas State Standards for History Government and Social Studies (2013)

http://www.ksde.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=zNGRyc6vESw%3d&tabid=472&portalid=0?=1587
Kentucky The Kentucky Academic Standards - Social Studies (grade-cluster standards for K-3 and high school, grade-level standards for 4-8) include a strand of standards (“Big Idea”) for Government and Civics. According to the standards, “the primary purpose of social studies is to help students develop the ability to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.” They promote the belief “that students must develop more than an understanding of social studies content. They must also be able to apply the content perspectives of several academic fields of the social studies to personal and public experiences.” According to the standards, “an understanding of civic ideals and practices of citizenship is critical to full participation in society and is a central purpose of the social studies.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: accurately describing various forms of government and analyze issues that relate to the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a democracy by exploring personal rights and responsibilities (grades K-3), by explaining how democratic governments of the present day function to preserve and protect the rights (e.g., voting), liberty, and property of their citizens by making, enacting and enforcing appropriate rules and laws (grade 6) and by examining ways that democratic governments do or do not preserve and protect the rights and liberties of their constituents (high school).
Kentucky Academic Standards - Social Studies (2013)

http://education.ky.gov/curriculum/standards/kyacadstand/Documents/Kentucky_Academic_Standards_Social_Studies.pdf
Louisiana Louisiana’s Social Studies Grade-Level Expectations (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics in grades K-8. The high school civics course includes the following standards: 1. Foundations of American Government, 2. Structure and Purposes of Government, 3. Functions of Government, 4. Role of the Citizen in American Democracy, among others.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: learning about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, explaining how people must work together to resolve conflict, and understanding the importance of respecting differences (grade 2), examining the role of citizen in government (grade 5), and examining how citizens can participate responsibly and effectively in American civic and political life (high school civics).
Social Studies Grade-Level Expectations (2011)

https://www.louisianabelieves.com/docs/default-source/academic-standards/standards---k-12-social-studies.pdf?sfvrsn=18
Maine The Maine Learning Results Parameters for Essential Instruction - Social Studies (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government. The Civics and Government strand includes the following three key performance indicators: 1. Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns of Civics/Government, 2. Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government, and 3. Individual, Cultural, International, and Global Connections in Civics and Government. The goal of the strand is for students to “draw on concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world.” Included in the document’s “Guiding Principles” is the goal for all students to leave school as responsible and involved citizens who “participate positively in the community and design creative solutions to meet human needs and wants; accept responsibility for personal decisions and actions; demonstrate ethical behavior and the moral courage to sustain it; understand and respect diversity; display global awareness and economic and civic literacy; and demonstrate awareness of personal and community health and wellness.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the concepts of rights, duties, responsibilities, and participation by explaining the purpose of school/classroom rules and laws encountered in daily experiences to promote the common good and the peaceful resolution of conflict (grade K-2), and understanding the constitutional and legal rights, the civic duties and responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a constitutional democracy and the role of citizens living under other forms of government in the world by evaluating how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience (high school).
Maine Learning Results Parameters for Essential Instruction - Social Studies (2007)

https://www1.maine.gov/doe/socialstudies/documents/ss102207.pdf
Maryland The Maryland State Curriculum for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8) include a strand of standards for Political Science. The Political Science strand incorporates civics content. Though the State Curriculum is currently being drafted for high school courses, a draft of the standards for the high school Government course also includes a strand of standards for Political Science and incorporates civics content.

Sample standards/benchmarks include:describing the rights and responsibilities of being a participating member of the family, school and neighborhood by identifying the rights, responsibilities and choices that students have in the family, school, and neighborhood (grade 1) and defending the importance of civic participation as a citizen of Maryland by analyzing ways people can participate in the political process including voting, petitioning elected officials, and volunteering (grade 4).
Maryland State Curriculum for Social Studies (2006)

http://mdk12.msde.maryland.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/standard1/allgradesinfo.html

http://mdk12.msde.maryland.gov/assessments/vsc/

http://mdk12.msde.maryland.gov/assessments/standards/9-12.html

http://mdk12.msde.maryland.gov/assessments/hsvsc/government.html
Massachusetts The Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework provides grade-level standards for K-7, and grade-cluster and course-specific standards for 8-12. The Framework provides required “Concepts and Skills” in Civics and Government for grades K-7 separately, and for grades 8-12 as a cluster. Civics standards are integrated throughout the framework and are included in the American Government and U.S. History courses offered to high school students. According to the framework, “devotion to human dignity and freedom, equal rights, justice, the rule of law, civility and truth, tolerance of diversity, mutual assistance, personal and civic responsibility, self-restraint and self-respect–all these must be taught and learned and practiced.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: explaining how American citizens were expected to participate in, monitor, and bring about changes in their government over time, and give examples of how they continue to do so today (grade 5) and explaining the rights and the responsibilities of citizenship and describing how a democracy provides opportunities for citizens to participate in the political process through elections, political parties, and interest groups (high school, U.S. History I).
Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework (2003)

http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/hss/final.pdf
Michigan Michigan’s Grade Level Expectations for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8) and High School Content Expectations for Social Studies (course-specific standards for high school) will soon be replaced by the Michigan K-12 Standards for Social Studies. The new standards are also grade-level standards for K-8 and course-specific for high school. They include a strand of standards for Civics and Government in Grades K-4, and 6-7. Civics is embedded in the content in other grades and courses including high school Civics. According to the draft standards, the goal of social studies is “to prepare young people to become responsible citizens. Responsible citizens display social understanding and civic efficacy... Instruction should provide activities that actively engage students so that they simultaneously learn about civic participation while involved in the civic life of their communities, our state, and our nation. The social studies curriculum prepares students to participate in political activities, to serve their communities, and to regulate themselves responsibly.” The standards provide eight descriptors of what a “responsible citizen” should look like, including: knowing how, when, and where to construct and express reasoned positions on public issues and acting constructively to further the public good.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding values and principles of American constitutional democracy by describing fair ways for groups to make decisions (Kindergarten), explaining important rights and how, when, and where American citizens demonstrate their responsibilities by participating in government (grade 4), and identifying the responsibilities associated with citizenship in the United States and the importance of those responsibilities in a democratic society through the investigation of questions such as: What are the responsibilities associated with citizenship in the United States? Why are those experiences considered important to the preservation of American constitutional government? (high school, Civics)
Michigan’s Grade Level Expectations for Social Studies (2007)

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/SSGLCE_218368_7.pdf

High School Content Expectations for Social Studies (2007)

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/SS_HSCE_210739_7_470248_7.pdf

Michigan K-12 Standards for Social Studies (Draft Revisions, 2015)

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/SS_COMBINED_August_2015_496557_7.pdf
Minnesota The Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Citizenship and Government. The following fours substrands are included in the Citizenship and Government strand: 1. civic skills, 2. civic values and principles of democracy, 3. rights and responsibilities, 4. governmental institutions and political processes, and 5. relationships of the United States to other nations and organizations. Some standards are repeated for multiple grades but the associated benchmarks become increasingly complex.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding that democratic government depends on informed and engaged citizens who exhibit civic skills and values, practice civic discourse, vote and participate in elections, apply inquiry and analysis skills, and take action to solve problems and shape public policy (grades K-12) by: demonstrating civic skills in a classroom that reflect an understanding of civic values (Kindergarten), simulating a historic event to show how civic engagement (voting, civil discourse about controversial issues and civic action) improves and sustains a democratic society, supports the general welfare, and protects the rights of individuals (grade 5), and exhibiting civic skills including participating in civic discussion on issues in the contemporary United States, demonstrating respect for the opinions of people or groups who have different perspectives, and reaching consensus (grade 7).
Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards -
Social Studies (2011)
http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/about/rule/rule/soc/

Minnesota Rules, part 3501.1300-1345
Mississippi The Mississippi Social Studies Framework (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) includes a strand for standards for Civil/Human Rights in grades K-4 and High School U.S. Government. The grade 6 “World Geography and Citizenship” course of study “focuses on the rudiments of civic engagement.” According to the framework, “The overarching goal of the 2011 Mississippi Social Studies Framework is citizenship education in order to foster the development of lifelong, responsible, accountable, global citizens in a democratic society.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the concept of rights and responsibilities of a good citizen by distinguishing between rights and responsibilities of individuals in relation to different social groups including, family, peer group, and classmates (Kindergarten), understanding the roles, rights, and responsibilities of Mississippi citizens by distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable behaviors of a responsible citizen grade 4), and understanding the role that governments play in the protection, expansion, and hindrance of civil/human rights of citizens (high school, U.S. Government).
Mississippi Social Studies Framework (2011)

http://www.mde.k12.ms.us/docs/curriculum-and-instructions-library/2011-mississsippi-social-studies-framework.pdf?sfvrsn=4
Missouri Missouri’s Social Studies Grade Level Expectations for Grades K-5 and 6-12 provide grade-level standards for grades K-5 and course-specific standards for grades 6-12. In grades K-5, civics standards can be found in the several “concept” strands including:1.Purposes and principles of the Bill of Rights, 2. Role of citizens in carrying out constitutional principles, 3. Character traits and civic attitudes of significant individuals, and 4. Methods of resolving conflict. Civics standards are embedded throughout much of the standards in grades 9-12, but are concentrated in the high school Government course.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: giving examples of being an active and informed citizen in the classroom or community (grade 1), analyzing ways by which citizens have effectively voiced opinions, monitored government, and brought about change both past and present (grade 5), and distinguishing the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve problems (high school government).
K-5 Social Studies Grade Level Expectations (2016)

https://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/curr-mls-standards-ss-k-5-sboe-2016.pdf

6-12 Social Studies Grade Level Expectations (2016)

https://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/curr-mls-standards-ss-6-12-sboe-2016.pdf
Montana The Montana Standards for Social Studies (grade-cluster standards) are divided into six central themes one of which is “analyzing how people create and change structures of power and authority, governance to understand the operation of government and to demonstrate civic responsibility (Content Standard 2). The same standards six are repeated for multiple grades but the associated benchmarks become increasingly complex.

Sample benchmarks for Standard 2 include: describing factors that cause conflict and contribute to cooperation among individuals and groups (e.g., playground issues, misunderstandings, listening skills, taking turns) (by the end of grade 4), explaining conditions, actions and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among groups and nations (e.g., discrimination, peer interaction, trade agreements) (by the end of grade 8), and analyzing and evaluating conditions, actions and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among groups and nations (e.g., current events from newspapers, magazines, television) (by the end of grade 12).
Montana Standards for Social Studies (2010)

http://opi.mt.gov/PDF/Standards/ContStds-SocSt.pdf
Nebraska The Nebraska Social Studies Standards (grade-level standards for K-5, grade-cluster standards for middle school and high school) include a strand of standards for Forms and Functions of Government and for Civic Participation. The purpose of the standards “is to teach children to become young patriots who have an intellectual understanding of the genius of our country’s founding principles and who feel an emotional connection to our nation. Achieving this purpose requires teaching Nebraska students to become responsible citizens who are prepared to preserve, protect and defend freedom in our nation and in the world.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying citizenship skills (e.g. responsibility, justice, equality and voting), describing how various individuals and groups influence the way an issue affecting the state is viewed and resolved (e.g., lobbying, petitions, media, social media) (grade 4), and engaging in civic activities (e.g., discussing current issues, advocating for personal rights and the rights of others, influencing governmental actions, participating in civil discourse, registering for selective service, participating in community improvement activities, service learning) (high school).
Nebraska Social Studies Standards (2012)

https://www.education.ne.gov/SS/Documents/2012December7VerticalNE_SocialStudiesStandardsApproved.pdf
Nevada The Revised Nevada State Social Studies Standards (grade-level standards for grades K-5, grade-cluster standards for middle school and high school) include a strand of standards for Citizenship and the Law. According to the standards, “democracy requires active participation. The framers of the U.S. Constitution envisioned a government strong enough to rule the nation with power derived from the people. To ensure the continuation of our complex and dynamic system of government, our increasingly diverse society must rely on the knowledge and skills of our citizens and elected public officials. Students study our political system including the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of governments at the local, state, tribal, and national levels, as well as the rights and responsibilities of a citizen.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: discussing that democracy involved voting, majority rule, and setting rules (grade 3), identifying and explaining the rights, privileges, and responsibilities associated with Nevada and U.S. citizenship, including voting, holding office, jury duty, and military service, community service, and public service (grades 6-8), and analyzing and evaluating the role of citizen participation in civic life (grade 9-12).
The Revised Nevada State Social Studies Standards (2008)

http://www.doe.nv.gov/Standards_Instructional_Support/Nevada_Academic_Standards/SocialStudies/
New Hampshire The New Hampshire K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Framework (grade-cluster standards) includes a strand of standards for Civics and Government. The Framework is broken up into ten themes, one of which is “Civics Ideals, Practices and Engagement.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: discussing ways individuals can be involved in their community, e.g., food drive or cleaning school grounds (Grades K-2), describing and analyzing ways Americans can effectively participate in civic and political life at the local, state, and federal levels, e.g., problem solving, public engagement, or voting (grades 7-8), and demonstrating responsible practices within the political process, e.g., registering to vote or taking civic action (grades 9-12).
New Hampshire K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Framework (2006)

http://education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/documents/frameworks.pdf
New Jersey The New Jersey Learning Standards for Social Studies (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for Civics, Government, and Human Rights. Civics content is also embedded in other strands and is organized under the “Active Citizen in the 21st Century” standard, which states that “all students will acquire the skills needed to be active, informed citizens who value diversity and promote cultural understanding by working collaboratively to address the challenges that are inherent in living in an interconnected world.” The vision of the standards is to provide “learners with knowledge, skills, and perspectives needed to become active, informed citizens and contributing members of local, state, national and global communities in the digital age.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding that the United States democratic system requires active participation if its citizens and explaining the process of creating change at the local, state or national level (by the end of grade 4), deliberating on a public issue affecting an upcoming election, considering opposing arguments, and developing a reasoned conclusion (by the end of grade 8), and developing a plan for public accountability and transparency in government related to a particular issue(s) and sharing the plan with appropriate government officials (by the end of grade 12).
New Jersey Learning Standards for Social Studies (2014)

http://www.state.nj.us/education/cccs/2014/ss/standards.pdf
New Mexico The New Mexico Social Studies Standards (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government. In all grades, students are expected to “understand the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship and understand the content and history of the founding documents of the United States with particular emphasis on the United States and New Mexico constitutions and how governments function at local, state, tribal, and national levels.” Common benchmarks and increasingly complex performance standards are provided to support this key objective.

Sample performance standards include: explaining the difference between rights and responsibilities, why we have rules and laws, and the role of citizenship in promoting them (grade 4), explaining the roles of citizens in political decision-making (e.g., voting, petitioning public officials, analyzing issues) (grade 7), and demonstrating the skills needed to participate in government at all levels, including: analyze public issues and the political system; evaluate candidates and their positions; debate current issues (high school).

Set of Standards: Social Studies
Strand: Civics and Government
New Mexico Social Studies Standards (2009)

http://www.ped.state.nm.us/standards/
New York The New York State Social Studies Framework provides grade-level and a curriculum framework. The framework provides a strand of standards for Civic Participation.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: demonstrating respect for the rights of others in discussion and classroom debates, regardless of whether one agrees with the other viewpoint and considering alternate views in discussion, with teacher support (grade 5), identifying describing, and contrasting the role of the individual in for social and political participation as an agent of historical change in different societies and communities, as well as at different times, in the United States (grade 8), and fulfilling social and political responsibilities associated with citizenship in a democratic society and interdependent global community by developing awareness of and/or engaging in the political process (high school).
New York State K-12 Social Studies Framework (2016)

https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-k-12-social-studies-framework
North Carolina The North Carolina Essential Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government. The standards have two primary purposes. “The first is to develop young people who are knowledgeable, critical, and capable of making informed decisions about the world and their place in it. The second purpose is to prepare young people to participate actively and responsibly in a culturally diverse, democratic, and increasingly interdependent world.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the importance of rules by summarizing ways in which conflict could be resolved in homes, schools, classrooms and communities (grade 1), understanding the role that civic participation plays in societal change by analyzing issues pursued through active citizen campaigns for change (grade 8), and explaining ways laws have been influenced by political parties, constituents, interest groups, lobbyists, the media and public opinion (high school, American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics).
North Carolina Essential Standards for Social Studies (2010)

http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/socialstudies/scos/#social
North Dakota The North Dakota Content and Achievement Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Government and Citizenship. The goal of the strand is for students to “understand the development, functions, and forms of various political institutions and the role of the citizen in government and society.”  Use of the standards is not mandated but assessments may be organized around the standards.

Sample benchmarks include: identifying the roles, rights, and responsibilities of a citizen in a community (e.g., obedience to laws, the right to vote, service to the common good) (grade 3), explaining the connections between the rights and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., voting and staying informed on issues; being tried by a jury and serving on juries; having rights and respecting the rights of others) (grade 8), and evaluating the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic participation (e.g., election system and process; naturalization; political activism) (high school).
North Dakota Content and Achievement Standards: Social Studies (2007)

https://www.nd.gov/dpi/uploads/87/Soc_studies.pdf
Ohio Ohio’s New Learning Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards/course syllabi for high school) include a strand of standards for Government, and a substrand (i.e. “Topic”) for Civic Participation and Skills. The standards “incorporate history, geography, government and economics in order to prepare students to be participating citizens. Specifically, social studies helps students develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for themselves and for the common good and prepares students for their role as citizens and decision makers in a diverse, democratic society”, among other things.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding that collaboration requires group members to respect the rights and opinions of others (grade 1), understanding that civic participation requires individuals to make informed and reasoned decisions by accessing and using information effectively (grade 4), and that the processes of persuasion, compromise, consensus building and negotiation contribute to the resolution of conflicts and differences (high school, American Government).
Ohio’s New Learning Standards: Social Studies Standards (2010)

http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Topics/Ohio-s-New-Learning-Standards/Social-Studies/SS-Standards.pdf.aspx
Oklahoma The Oklahoma Academic Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for PreK-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Citizenship Literacy in PreK-3. Civics is embedded in the content in other grades and courses.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: exhibiting traits of good citizenship by recognizing the importance of rules and responsibilities as a member of a family, class and school (grade 1), analyzing the traits of good citizens by recognizing the sacrifices and contributions to American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence (grade 3), and evaluating the significance of civic participation in order to insure the preservation of constitutional government (high school, United States Government).
Oklahoma Academic Standards - Social Studies (2012)

http://sde.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/Social%20Studies%20OK%20Academic%20Standards.rev815pdf.pdf
Oregon The Oregon Social Sciences Academic Content Standards (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government. The document also provides “Core Standards” (the knowledge and skills expected of a prepared Oregon high school graduate) for Civics and Government. According to the standards, “studying the Social Sciences helps students develop as rational, humane and productive citizens in a democratic society.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: demonstrating the ability to be both a leader and a team member (grade 1), describing the responsibilities of citizens in their community and state (grade 3), and explaining the responsibilities of citizens (e.g., vote, pay taxes) (high school).
The Oregon Social Sciences Academic Content Standards (2011)

http://www.ode.state.or.us/teachlearn/subjects/socialscience/standards/adoptedsocialsciencesstandards8-2011.pdf
Pennsylvania The Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Civics and Government (grade-level standards for PreK-8, 9 and 12 and course-specific for high school) include a strand of standards for “Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship.” The standards are “based on the Public School Code of 1949 which directs ‘teaching and presentation of the principles and ideals of the American republican representative form of government as portrayed and experienced by the acts and policies of the framers of the Declaration of Independence and framers of the Constitution of the United States and Bill of Rights’. The intent of the Code is that such instruction ‘shall have for its purpose also instilling into every boy and girl who comes out of public, private and parochial schools their solemn duty and obligation to exercise intelligently their voting privilege and to understand the advantages of the American republican representative form of government as compared with various other forms of governments.’”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying personal rights and responsibilities (grade 3), describing how citizens resolve conflicts in society and government (grade 8), and evaluating an individual's civil rights, responsibilities and obligations in various contemporary governments (grade 12).
Academic Standards for Civics and Government Grades PreK-3 (2012)

http://static.pdesas.org/content/documents/PreK-2_Civics_and_Government_Standards.pdf

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Grades 3-8 (2012)


http://static.pdesas.org/content/documents/Academic_Standards_for_Civics_and_Government_(Elementary).pdf

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Grades 9, 12

http://static.pdesas.org/content/documents/Academic_Standards_for_Civics_and_Government_(Secondary).pdf
Rhode Island The Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for Civics and Government.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: comparing similarities between a rule and a law (grades 3-4), exhibiting and explaining what it means to be a responsible citizen in the state and nation (grades 7-8), and interacting with political institutions and/or political parties in order to evaluate how they shape the public agenda (high school).
Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations for Social Studies (2012)

http://www.ride.ri.gov/portals/0/uploads/documents/instruction-and-assessment-world-class-standards/social-studies/ri-ss-gses-k-12-final-version.pdf

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations for Social Studies Civics and Government Strand (2012)

http://www.ride.ri.gov/Portals/0/Uploads/Documents/Instruction-and-Assessment-World-Class-Standards/Social-Studies/RI-SS-GSEs-K-12-C-G-Strand.pdf
South Carolina The theme of the South Carolina Social Studies Academic Standards (grade-cluster standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) is civic education. Though the standards are not organized in strands, civics content is embedded throughout and can also be found in the grade-level and course-specific “Social Studies Literacy Skills for the 21st Century” (overarching skills required for content understanding). If the standards are met, students should exhibit certain civics skills such as: practicing responsible citizenship within their schools, community and state (by the end of grade 3), demonstrating responsible citizenship within local, state and national communities (by the end of grade 5), understanding responsible citizenship in relation to the state, national, and international communities (by the end of grade 8), and, modeling informed participatory citizenship (by the end of grade 12).

Sample standards/benchmarks supporting these civics skills include: demonstrating an understanding of the values that American democracy represents and upholds (Kindergarten), and demonstrating an understanding of foundational American political principles and the historical events and philosophical ideas that shaped the development and application of these principles (high school, United States Government).
South Carolina Social Studies Academic Standards (2011)

http://ed.sc.gov/scdoe/assets/file/agency/ccr/Standards-Learning/documents/FINALAPPROVEDSSStandardsAugust182011.pdf
South Dakota The South Dakota Social Studies Content Standards (grade-level standards for K-8, grade-cluster standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Civics/Government. The goal of the standards is “to ensure graduates of South Dakota’s public schools have the knowledge, skills, and competencies essential to leading productive, fulfilling, and successful lives as they continue their education, enter the workforce, and assume their civic responsibilities.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the ways in which a citizen can use their basic rights to influence decisions of the republic by explaining how democracy relies upon citizens’ responsible participation, and drawing implications for how individuals should participate (grade 5), analyzing ways that citizens can affect or influence the U.S. society and government (grade 8), and assessing options for action to address local, regional, and global problems by volunteer engagement (high school).
South Dakota Social Studies Content Standards (2015)

http://doe.sd.gov/ContentStandards/documents/SDSocialS.pdf
Tennessee The Tennessee State Academic Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Government and Civics in grades K-2. Civics content is embedded in the social studies content in later primary grades and is also embedded in the “Contemporary Issues” and “United States Government and Civics” high school courses. The goal of the high school Government and Civics course is for students “to study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the Constitution. Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state, and national government. Students will learn the structure and processes of the government of the state of Tennessee and various local governments.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens of the United States (grade 2), and analyzing how the Bill of Rights limits the powers of the federal government and state governments (high school, United States Government and Civics course).
Tennessee Academic Standards for Social Studies (2013)

https://www.tn.gov/education/article/social-studies-standards
Texas The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies (grade-specific standards for K-8, course-specific standards for high school) include a strand of standards for Government and Citizenship for K-8 and in some high school social studies courses.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a constitutional republic (grade 3), understanding the importance of the expression of different points of view in a democratic society (grade 7), and understanding the importance of voluntary individual participation in the U.S. constitutional republic (high school, United States Government course).
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies (2011)

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/index.html

19 TAC 113
Utah Utah’s Core Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards for K-6, course-specific standards for 7-12) includes a strand of standards for Citizenship in grades K-2. Civics content is embedded in the social studies content in later primary grades and is also embedded in the “United States Government and Citizenship” high school course. The goal of the United States Government and Citizenship course is to “foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system. This course is recommended for seniors due to their proximity to voting age.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: recognizing the roles and responsibilities of being a good citizen by investigating and explaining how symbols and songs unite families and classmates(kindergarten), understanding the roles of civic life, politics, and government in the lives of Utah citizens by describing the responsibilities and rights of individuals in a representative government as well as in the school and community (fourth grade), and understanding the significance and impact of the Constitution on everyday life (high school, United States Government and Citizenship course).
Utah Core Standards for Social Studies (2010)

http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/socialstudies/Core.aspx
Vermont Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities in History and Social Sciences (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for Civics, Government and Society. The goal of the standards is to encourage “learning that involves students' active participation in projects that address global issues of a social, political, economic, or environmental nature; and is oriented to human rights, social justice, and environmentalism at the local, regional, and global level.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a school and local community (by the end of grade 4),describing and defining the rights, principles, and responsibilities of citizenship in the U.S. (e.g., the right to vote and the responsibility to obey the law) (by the end of grade 6), and analyzing and evaluating changes in the interpretation of rights and responsibilities of citizenship over time (e.g., changes in voting age, changes in voting rights for women and African Americans) (by the end of high school).
The Grade Expectations for Vermont’s Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities - History and Social Sciences (2004)

http://education.vermont.gov/student-learning/content-areas/global-citizenship
Virginia Virginia’s History and Social Science Standards of Learning (grade-level standards for K-3 only) include a strand of standards for Civics (grades K-3) and standards for “Civics and Economics” (not grade-specific), and “Virginia and United States Government” (not grade-specific) courses. According to the standards, “the goal of civics instruction is to develop in all students the requisite knowledge and skills for informed, responsible participation in public life. Civics instruction should provide regular opportunities at each grade level for students to develop a basic understanding of politics and government and to practice the skills of good citizenship. It should instill relevant skills so that students can assess political resources, deal intelligently with controversy, and understand the consequences of policy decisions.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: recognizing the symbols and traditional practices that honor the Commonwealth of Virginia (grade 1), recognizing the importance of government in the community, Virginia and the USA (grade 3), taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues (civics and economics), and applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions (Virginia and United States Government).

History and Social Science Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools (2015)

http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/sol/standards_docs/history_socialscience/2015/stds_history_social_science.pdf
Washington The Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards (grade-level standards) include a strand of standards for Civics. The goal of this strand is to ensure “the student understands and applies knowledge of government, law, politics, and the nation's fundamental documents to make decisions about local, national, and international issues and to demonstrate thoughtful, participatory citizenship.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: understanding the key ideals of justice and fairness within the context of the classroom community (Kindergarten), understanding the key ideals of unity and diversity (grade 3), and analyzing and evaluating the ways in which the U.S. Constitution and other fundamental documents promote key ideals and principles (grade 11).
Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards (2013)

http://www.k12.wa.us/SocialStudies/pubdocs/SocialStudiesStandards.pdf
West Virginia West Virginia’s College- and Career-Readiness Standards for Social Studies (grade-level standards) include a strand of standards for Civics. The goal of the strand is to prepare “students to be informed, active and effective citizens who accept their responsibilities, understand their privileges and rights and participate actively in society and government. Civics addresses both citizenship and political systems. Citizenship education prepares students to be informed, active and effective citizens who accept their responsibilities, understand their privileges and rights and participate actively in society and government.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: modeling patriotism, cooperation, tolerance and respect for others within school and community (grade 1), illustrating the rights, responsibilities, duties, and privileges of a patriotic citizen within authentic situations (e.g., election, food drive, jury duty, etc.) and defending these actions as examples or non-examples of good citizenship (grade 5), and comparing and contrast various citizens’ responses to controversial government actions and debate decisions (grade 11).
West Virginia Standards for College and Career Readiness in Social Studies (2016)

http://apps.sos.wv.gov/adlaw/csr/readfile.aspx?DocId=29936&Format=PDF

http://wveis.k12.wv.us/Teach21/public/ng_cso/NG_CSO.cfm?tsele1=3&tsele2=50
Wisconsin Wisconsin’s Model Academic Standards for Social Studies (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for “Political Science and Citizenship.” The goal of the strand is for students to “acquire the knowledge of political systems necessary for developing individual civic responsibility.”

Sample standards/benchmarks include: identifying and explaining the individual's responsibilities to family, peers, and the community, including the need for civility and respect for diversity (by the end of grade 4), Locating, organizing, and using relevant information to understand an issue of public concern, take a position, and advocate the position in a debate (by the end of grade 8), and identifying ways people may participate effectively in community affairs and the political process (by the end of grade 12).
Wisconsin’s Model Academic Standards for Social Studies (1997)

http://dpi.wi.gov/sites/default/files/imce/standards/New%20pdfs/WMAS%20for%20Social%20Studies.pdf
Wyoming The Wyoming Social Studies Content and Performance Standards (grade-cluster standards) include a strand of standards for “Citizenship, Government, and Democracy.” The goal of the strand is for students “to analyze how people create and change structures of power, authority, and governance to understand the continuing evolution of governments and to demonstrate civic responsibility.” In order to receive a high school diploma, instruction in civics/government must be given for at least three years in kindergarten through grade 8 and one year in the secondary grades.

Sample standards/benchmarks include: describing the basic rights and responsibilities of citizenship (by the end of grade 5), explaining how to participate in the political process (by the end of grade 8), and explaining and/or demonstrating how to participate in the political process and form personal opinions (by the end of grade 12).
Wyoming Social Studies Content and Performance Standards (2014)


https://edu.wyoming.gov/downloads/standards/2015/2014-SS-WyCPS-FINAL.pdf

The "standards/benchmarks" descriptor used throughout this database is meant to describe required competencies, though the terminology used varies by state.

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